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U. UTAH PHILLIPS:
I've Got to Know: CD
Utah Phillips is a pretty good storyteller. He's like that old guy who gives you a little weed at a party and tells you all kinds of fascinating shit that you wish you could remember in the morning. His stories on this CD all have to do with being against war, and it's interesting stuff, even if you have heard most of it before in one way or another. He also does some folk songs on acoustic guitar. Skip over those. –sean (AK Press)


U. UTAH PHILLIPS:
Starlight on the Rails: A Songbook: AK Press
This is a small sample of the huge collection AK Press is putting together. When fully released, it’s going to be four CDs and a booklet. And almost forty bucks. I like Utah Phillips, and it’s interesting to hear the explanations before each song, but for repeated listening, the format of explanation followed by song gets tedious and would work better separated onto separate disks so you can enjoy the music alone. –megan (CD)


U. UTAH PHILLIPS:
I’ve Got to Know: CD
Utah Phillips is a pretty good storyteller. He’s like that old guy who gives you a little weed at a party and tells you all kinds of fascinating shit that you wish you could remember in the morning. His stories on this CD all have to do with being against war, and it’s interesting stuff, even if you have heard most of it before in one way or another. He also does some folk songs on acoustic guitar. Skip over those.  –sean (AK Press)


U.D.I.:
Unidentified Drunken Injury: LP
Thrashcore with vocals that sound like when Beavis goes into Cornholio mode. Includes a couple sweet skull drawings and song titles such as, “Wake Up and Drink” and “Go Kill Yourself.” The guitar is low in the mix and the riffs are generic, but there’s still plenty of fun to be had here. –CT Terry (Spider Cuddler)


U.K. SUBS:
XXIV: LP
It’s no secret that I am a big U.K. Subs fan. Another Kind of Blues was the first British punk album I heard after getting Never Mind the Bollocks… Here’s the Sex Pistols around the age of twelve. That album spoke to me to the point that when it came time to name my radio show decades later I ended up going with Stranglehold (obviously a name that continues to follow me around). Well, here we are in 2013 and Charlie Harper and the boys are still at it. With XXIV they are within two albums of completing their mission of releasing a record beginning with each letter of the alphabet. Sure, it’s going to take almost forty years, but Harper is a stubborn punk. I have no doubt he will get it done. This record sounds amazing, almost to the point where it doesn’t sound like the Subs at times. Don’t get me wrong, there are lots of songs that exude that bluesy punk swagger, but, overall, this is a harder sounding, slickly produced Subs. The more I listen to it, the more I like it, so you have to give it a chance. Overall, it just makes me happy that U.K. Subs are still a band and Charlie Harper is not only playing and writing music, but out there kicking ass at it. It gives me hope that many of us will still be able to be punks when we are in our seventies. Cheers to you Charlie! –ty (Captain Oi!)


U.K. Subs:
Ziezo: LP
The last letter in the alphabet means this is the last studio album from this band. Although I do think they will continue on as a live act, even though lead guitarist Jet split after this was released. It is on black and orange swirl wax, too, which is super-neat! This record sounds killer, due to Pat Collier (The Vibrators) manning the board. The songs live up to the hype. “Maid of Orleans” and “Polarisation” stayed lodged in my frontal lobe, but with sixteen songs to choose from, you will have time to get your own party favorites. –Sean Koepenick (Self-released, uksubs.co.uk)


U.S. BOMBS:
Tora Tora Tora: 7"
This seven inch convinced me to go get the new U.S. Bombs album ("Back at the Laundromat"). "Tora Tora Tora" is a true punk anthem. The Bombs opened their show with it the last time I saw them, and everyone went nuts. It's the first real evidence that our combined hatred of George W. is leading to some great punk rock. The cover has a funny picture of George W. with a Hitler mustache, and, though the song is on "Back to the Laundromat," this version has different little cool aspects in the mix. The b-side, "Yer Country," is the second piece of evidence that bad president = good punk rock. It's a hell of a seven inch. A very powerful single. Both of these songs are on the "Back to the Laundromat," but if you're unsure whether or not you want that album, this is a good way to test the waters. –sean (TKO, 4104 24th Street #103, SF, CA 94114; www.tkorecords.com)


U.S. BOMBS:
Put Strength In The Final Blow: CD
Even though this particular barrage of U.S. Bombs audial hostility is a couple of years old, it assuredly still warrants the undivided attention of anyone seeking the ultimate in punkrock unruliness. The vocals are caustic, cutting, and aggressively confrontational... the mayhem-inspiring musicianship is frenzied, fever-pitched, and wildly flailing all over the fuckin’ place... the socio-political lyrics are sarcastic, articulate, and grab-ya-by-the-throat thought-provoking. Yeh, pure blood-curdling punkrock chaos! I’ve deliriously listened to these ballsy blistering tunes for several hours now while feverishly slamdancin’ with my towerin’-and-boomin’ stereo speakers... sure I’m a bloody, sweaty, mangled mess, but I’m more than ready for another unrelenting round of the U.S. Bombs and their ferocious sonic sedition. When I drunkenly stumble off this miserable mortal coil, I want the insurgent sounds of Put Strength In The Final Blow to be loudly played at my funeral... it’ll surely raise me from the dead! –Roger Moser Jr. (Alive)


U.S. BOMBS:
“Art Kills” b/w “Framed”: 7”
I like and respect TKO Records, but my main complaint about them is that they will often release a seven inch or EP with stuff that’s all previously released. Here we have two singles off of the new US Bombs album. They’re both good songs, but, for a few dollars more, you could buy the album and get eleven more songs. And, if you really want to support TKO, pick up the new album by The Boils. They’re fucking awesome. –sean (TKO)


U.S. BOMBS:
Lost in America/Live 2001: CD
Wooo-hooo, it’s the U.S. Bombs in all of their loud, obnoxious glory – live, uncontrollable, and in your motherfuckin’ face! This is a chaotic collection of some of the most pissed-off sounds that’s ever been insolently tossed into a frenzied, slam-dancing crowd of unruly spiky-haired punk hooligans. Recorded during various balls-out performances on their “Back at the Laundromat” tour in 2001, this hard-hittin’ disc vividly captures the U.S. Bombs at their most fierce, tumultuous, explosive, and clamorous. Such high-velocity and volatile sonic eruptions as “Tora! Tora! Tora!," “Die Alone," “Isolated Ones," “Rubber Room," “War Birth," “The World," “Goin’ Out," “Yanks," “Ballad of Sid," and a bulgin’ barrel full more feverishly scream their way outta this flesh-carvin’ display of all-out auditory attitude. Lost in America is proof positive that the boisterously bad-ass Bomb boys are the most true-hearted and wildly animated bunch of insurrectionist louts proudly keepin’ the spit-stained spirit of punkrock alive and snarling today. –Guest Contributor (Disaster)


U.S. BOMBS:
Art Kills b/w Framed: 7"
I like and respect TKO Records, but my main complaint about them is that they will often release a seven inch or EP with stuff that’s all previously released. Here we have two singles off of the new US Bombs album. They’re both good songs, but, for a few dollars more, you could buy the album and get eleven more songs. And, if you really want to support TKO, pick up the new album by The Boils. They’re fucking awesome. –sean (TKO)


U.S. BOMBS:
Covert Action: CD
Not too long ago, I saw Duane Peters and the US Bombs play a show, and I fell in love with Duane even more. That man knows how to dance. And the Bombs know how to rock. The Bombs were in fine form with Back at the Laundromat, and their follow-up tracks in Covert Action are tight. The Bombs have their sound down, but they’re still trying new stuff. I especially enjoyed Kerry Martinez’s contribution, “Faith of Marie,” an instrumental that really showcased Martinez’s often-overlooked talent. Man, I hope I see these guys live again soon. I wanna dance with Duane. Preferably to “Faith of Marie.” –felizon (Hellcat)


U.S. BOMBS:
Put Strength In The Final Blow: CD
Even though this particular barrage of U.S. Bombs audial hostility is a couple of years old, it assuredly still warrants the undivided attention of anyone seeking the ultimate in punkrock unruliness. The vocals are caustic, cutting, and aggressively confrontational... the mayhem-inspiring musicianship is frenzied, fever-pitched, and wildly flailing all over the fuckin’ place... the socio-political lyrics are sarcastic, articulate, and grab-ya-by-the-throat thought-provoking. Yeh, pure blood-curdling punkrock chaos! I’ve deliriously listened to these ballsy blistering tunes for several hours now while feverishly slamdancin’ with my towerin’-and-boomin’ stereo speakers... sure I’m a bloody, sweaty, mangled mess, but I’m more than ready for another unrelenting round of the U.S. Bombs and their ferocious sonic sedition. When I drunkenly stumble off this miserable mortal coil, I want the insurgent sounds of Put Strength In The Final Blow to be loudly played at my funeral... it’ll surely raise me from the dead! –Guest Contributor (Alive)


U.S. BOMBS:
Back at the Laundromat: CD
I couldn't imagine this would be a good album. Duane Peters had just put out two really cool albums with the Hunns in less than a year, and I couldn't imagine him being prolific enough to be able to put anything into a new Bombs album. I was dead wrong. I forgot about the rest of the band. I forgot that the U.S. Bombs aren't a one man show. Kerry Martinez is one of the best guitarists in punk rock. He's like the old, crusty guy you see at the skate park who drops into the bowl and pulls off mind-blowing tricks with seemingly less effort than he puts into tying his shoes. But it's not about the tricks. Kerry is all style. He's not showing off. He's looking at the bowl and figuring out how to carve it. He's guitar equivalent to Duane's skating, I guess. Then, you back these two up with Chip on drums and Wade on bass, driving the song into a swirling pit, and "Back to the Laudromat" is every bit as good as "Garibaldi Guard" and the rest of the albums. The best compliment I can pay this album, though, is this: I saw these guys about a month ago. They played mostly their newer stuff. The whole crowd seemed to scream along with every song, and even though I went in hoping to hear a bunch of old songs, I wasn't disappointed. I left thinking, shit, I'd already seen them play the old songs years ago. I'm stoked I could see them play new ones. –sean (Hellcat)


U.S. BOMBS:
Tora Tora Tora: 7"
This seven inch convinced me to go get the new U.S. Bombs album (see above review). "Tora Tora Tora" is a true punk anthem. The Bombs opened their show with it the last time I saw them, and everyone went nuts. It's the first real evidence that our combined hatred of George W. is leading to some great punk rock. The cover has a funny picture of George W. with a Hitler mustache, and, though the song is on "Back to the Laundromat," this version has different little cool aspects in the mix. The b-side, "Yer Country," is the second piece of evidence that bad president = good punk rock. It's a hell of a seven inch. A very powerful single. Both of these songs are on the "Back to the Laundromat," but if you're unsure whether or not you want that album, this is a good way to test the waters. –sean (TKO)


U.S. BOMBS:
Put Strength in the Final Blow: CD
More mid-tempo, vaguely Sex Pistols-without-the-wall-of-guitar-sound punk from the U.S. Bombs. To this day, I sorta expect USB to be more manic and am always temporarily thrown off by their slightly laid-back approach. It’s just that the mystique of Duane Peters looms so large and dementedly over the band. He’s like the skatepunk’s version of GG Allin, a man who – as legend has it – has never hesitated to serve up his keloid-scarred body to further injury and manglement. So, because of Mr. Peters’ infamous exploits in the many styles of self-abuse, I continually find U.S. Bombs to be not as reckless as I think they would be with a maniac like that at the wheel. U.S. Bombs is like the cafeteria meatloaf of punk rock; sometimes tasty, sometimes full of stuff you don’t ever want to know about, nothing I’d ever want to make a strict diet of. –aphid (Disaster)


U.S. CHAOS / STATCH AND THE RAPES:
We Are Your Enemy: Split 7”
US Chaos: “Blame It on Sam” was recorded in ‘83, lost, refound almost twenty years later, and finally pressed. It stands up as catchy as, say, The Vibrators in a very bad, very cynical mood. It’s poppy in a mid-tempo, swaggering way, and the song’s basically about fucking shit up, not taking personal responsibility, and blaming the powers that be. Oddly soothing. Statch and the Rapes win the “Most Offensive Band Name Title” for the year and I wish the band was as aurally off-putting to back it up. They’re pretty tame and in a strange way remind me of a PG version of the Anti-Heros, where the songs are half spoken, half yelled, the lyrics are real easy to follow, and the instrumentation ain’t bad, but unlike the Anti-Heros, they don’t seem to have a lot of teeth and snarl to back up the barking. Not poo, but my pants aren’t on fire, either. –todd (Punkrockrecords)


U.S. CHAOS/STATCH AND THE RAPES:
We Are Your Enemy: Split 7"
US Chaos: “Blame It on Sam” was recorded in ‘83, lost, refound almost twenty years later, and finally pressed. It stands up as catchy as, say, The Vibrators in a very bad, very cynical mood. It’s poppy in a mid-tempo, swaggering way, and the song’s basically about fucking shit up, not taking personal responsibility, and blaming the powers that be. Oddly soothing. Statch and the Rapes win the “Most Offensive Band Name Title” for the year and I wish the band was as aurally off-putting to back it up. They’re pretty tame and in a strange way remind me of a PG version of the Anti-Heros, where the songs are half spoken, half yelled, the lyrics are real easy to follow, and the instrumentation ain’t bad, but unlike the Anti-Heros, they don’t seem to have a lot of teeth and snarl to back up the barking. Not poo, but my pants aren’t on fire, either. –todd (Punkrockrecords)


U.S. ROUGHNECKS:
Twenty Bucks and Two Black Eyes: CD
I’ll admit that when I saw this was on Hellcat, my underwear bunched up on me a little bit. But when I looked at the back cover and saw all the skeletons, I got my hopes up. I thought maybe it would end up being some decent, Misfits-y schlock punk; something obviously derivative, but certainly listenable—like Bobby Steele’s Undead. Was I off! The skeletons on the back cover are the only thing Misfits-y about these guys. No one’s hairdo in this band is anything close to a devilock. These are loud ‘n’ proud skinheads who play weightlifting street punk with a singer who sounds like a pro wrassler in a cranky mood. They prefer to call themselves “short haired rock-n-roll.” I’m sure these guys would probably beat me into jelly with baseball bats if they ever saw those old pictures of me with Robert Plant hair, but I like them anyway. Like so many bands from this particular subgenre, this is meaty and menacing and just plain hard not to like, in spite of it’s cartoony, pitbull-like earnestness. –aphid (Hellcat)


U.S.S. HORSEWHIP:
Wants You Dead: CD
This is very “intelligent”-sounding postpunk that lies somewhere between the Hot Snakes and the 400 Blows, with a little late-period Fugazi thrown in, especially on the vocals. It’s pretty damn good. In fact, the only negative thing I can think to say about this is that they were trying too hard to come up with clever song titles, and it comes across like the class clown in middle school that was a nice enough kid, but was just always trying too hard to get attention. Still, I guess I’d rather listen to a song called “1 800 PUPPIES” than one called “Let’s Go, Baby” or some shit like that. Other than the song titles, though, this album rocks pretty hard and I think you should buy one. –ben (New Regard Media)


U.X. VILEHEADS:
First: EP
Sounds like this was done by a bunch of fourteen-year-old kids living in the middle of nowhere circa 1982. However, U.X. Vileheads consists of ex-members of the Vicious, DS-13, and Regulations. Seems this crew has it wired when it comes to nailing the sound and feel of early hardcore. What’s the secret? Do you guys only listen to the old stuff and nothing else? A pact with Satan? Seriously, many out there try to capture the sound and fall short. These fuckers never fail to deliver, no matter what band they’re in. It’s pure hardcore that’s equally tuneful and thrashy. Imagine if the Offenders had relocated from Texas to DC in the early ‘80s. It would sound something like this. “Shut Down” reminds me of “I Hate Myself” in tone and delivery. In fact, lyrically, these guys are definitely not all smiles and looking to the brighter side of life. Instead, it’s all a world of self-destruction and embracing the inevitable ugly ending. Being their debut, you get four quick blasts of nihilism in the form of three chords, crashing percussion, and a slightly belligerent vocalist. Throw yourself into the gaping maw of hell and get this on the way down. –Matt Average (Deranged)


U.X. VILEHEADS:
Catch 22: EP
The title track has nothing to do with Joseph Heller’s 1961 novel of the same name. Nor is the song “Kill for Christ” a FU’s cover. However, this is the second EP from these guys, and though it’s a little less blatantly urgent than the first EP, they’ve added more tension by slightly slowing some of the songs down and getting a little more musical. The title track is a burner with its fast attack and vocal delivery that’s convincingly desperate. “Kill for Peace” is pretty good, slightly longer, and reminds me of the Regulations and ETA. I like how they build up “No Salvation” with the vocals shouting, “Do what they say, Obey your god, Do what they say...” over and over with the drums underneath before they bring in the rest of instruments in one quick wave. “Down Again” ends sort of like the record began: a mix of fast and slow with urgency throughout. Yes, this is hardcore, and everything is laid out without pretension, but if you listen a little closer than usual, there’s more power here than just a burst of “1-2-3-Go!” Tempos change and guitars go quiet while the drums momentarily take over. A tried and true formula, but played with conviction, for sure. –Matt Average (Sorry State, sorrystaterecords.com)


UBANGI STOMP:
Self-titled: CD
Another trashy punk’n’roll band. This one didn’t do a damn thing for me. –jimmy (Brain Drain, PO Box 39441, Greensboro, NC 27438)


UBU ROI: Demo: Cassette:
Demo: Cassette
Screamy, noisy old school punk rock. Reminds me a little of those Scared Of Chaka songs where they took away the pretense of melody and just started belting out the songs. This is great keep-me-awake music for those long road trips. If I were a better English major, I would write a very long explanation comparing the band to the proto-absurdist play of their namesake. Instead, I’ll just say “Yeah, this is pretty good. Another!” –Bryan Static (Self-released)


UCHAZIM:
Marnostroj: CD
Out of flames rises the sound of lead pipes crashing against skulls. It’s chaotic at first, but soon falls into a rhythm. Then the howling begins, the chanting, the pleading. Everything crashes in around one voice. Hands grab the collar of your shirt and you’re not sure if they want to pull you into the fire or if they are hoping you will pull them out. This long-running, indescribably intense Czech hardcore band needs to be heard. –mp (bandzone.cz/uchazim)


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