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KNIGHTS OF THE NEW CRUSADE:
My God Is Alive! Sorry About Yours!: CD
This has GOT to be a joke. Thirteen tracks here whose alleged sole purpose is to sing the praises of Jesus Christ and condemn the sinful state in which this world finds itself, all done up in neo-'60s garage rock. If this is, in fact, a joke, then songs like "Ain't No Monkeys in My Family Tree," "Dangers of Dating" and "'E' is for Evil" rank up there with the best works of bands like Crucial Youth and Fearless Iranians from Hell in pointed parody. If this isn't a joke, and their music is, indeed, "the weapon in our crusade for Christ Almighty," then Jesus's army is in sorry shape, 'cause it's staggeringly hard to take seriously four guys wearing modified buckets on their heads. –jimmy (www.crusadenow.com)


KNIGHTS OF THE NEW CRUSADE:
A Challenge to the Cowards of Christendom: CD
By now most of the underground knows this band is a piss-take on so-called Christian rock, and it is indeed a funny one. From the Chick Comics-inspired cover to songs like “Father Bingo,” “‘E’ Is Still Evil,” and “What Part of ‘Thou Shall Not Kill’ Don’t You Understand?” to the little Jesus fish included for the car bumper, these guys have their bases covered. Musically, it’s Bay Area garage rock, which means it’s loud and trashy. Can’t wait to see if they manage to get themselves a live spot on KTBN. –jimmy (Alternative Tentacles)


KNIGHTS OF THE NEW CRUSADE:
My God Is Alive! Sorry About Yours!: CD
This has GOT to be a joke. Thirteen tracks here whose alleged sole purpose is to sing the praises of Jesus Christ and condemn the sinful state in which this world finds itself, all done up in neo-’60s garage rock. If this is, in fact, a joke, then songs like “Ain’t No Monkeys in My Family Tree,” “Dangers of Dating” and “‘E’ is for Evil” rank up there with the best works of bands like Crucial Youth and Fearless Iranians from Hell in pointed parody. If this isn’t a joke, and their music is, indeed, “the weapon in our crusade for Christ Almighty,” then Jesus’s army is in sorry shape, ‘cause it’s staggeringly hard to take seriously four guys wearing modified buckets on their heads. –jimmy (www.crusadenow.com)


KNIVES:
Demo: CD
Five songs of circle-pit-ready, four-chord hardcore punk. Nice in-your-face recording. I could see these folks fitting into the suburban D.C. scene of the mid-’90s or suburban L.A. in the early ‘80s. Honestly, while Knives rock, they aren’t terribly original, and could fit in anywhere. Sometimes, the best way to judge a demo is to ask yourself, “Would this make for a good 7”?” In this case, the answer is “Yes.” So bring it on, y’all. –CT Terry (Flat Black)


KNOCK KNOCK:
We Will Raise Your Child: LP
Perhaps not the best line to start off a record review with: I know very little about the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Apples In Stereo, or Neutral Milk Hotel. With the old stuff, it’s not from lack of exposure. It’s just that I truly don’t care. The last time Revolver was played for me, I just wanted it to end. It’s not for me. To me, Bob Dylan is a Yoda-sounding dude who wrote a song that helped sell women’s bras and panties to pad his social security check. No venom, just a pass. But, with a band like Knock Knock, I’ve got that sneaking suspicion that they’re familiar with and like many or all of the aforementioned bands. Funny thing is that I really like Knock Knock while I couldn’t care less—musically—about what I’m supposing are their influences. This is a very pleasant, lush, singer-songwritten “I have a kid, here’s a concept record” album. There are touches of psyche-pop, of the Hair soundtrack, an occasional glockenspiel. It’s less for fans of the new Total Chaos and more for fans of Go Metric. Almost an alternate universe “child appropriate,” PG-rated, de-iced, I’ll-pre-peel-that-Banana-for-you FM Knives? Maybe that’s just the Sacramento steeping into the tea. If you were a fan of the recently re-released Bright Ideas 12”, may I recommend Knock Knock? Another example of punks aging gracefully and making unexpected music instead of embarrassing everyone by pretending to be perpetual teenagers. –todd (Sacramento, sacramaniacs.com / Phono Select)


KNOCKOUT:
Searching for Solid Ground: CD
This pop-punk release from Fearless, a label which is apparently trying to lay claim to being the ancestral home of nearly all music that sucks, made me consider playing Russian Roulette with a Glock 21. I want to hunt this band down and demand an explanation from each and every one of these tattooed, pierced, plugged, spiky-haired pop-punk fuckheads. And as I brandish the crowbar at them, I will demand that they simply answer this – do they really think that mainstream Hot Topic punk doesn’t suck enough already and that they single-handedly need to provide us with conclusive proof of how much worse it can get? Hate isn’t a strong enough word to describe my complete and utter revulsion and antipathy for this album. –scott (Fearless)


KNOCKOUT PILLS:
1 + 1= Ate: CD
The first time I heard the Knockout Pills—an unreleased pre-mastered version—I was kinda doubtful. See, I love, love, loved the Weird Lovemakers and when they split up, the lead singer and one of the main song writers went to different corners (a bookstore and SF, to be exact.) Jason “Part of the Problem” Willis, the guitarist, and Gerrard (otherwise known as “Wallaby, Wallaby Dingo”) of the Weird Lovemakers joined up with Travis “the Archie Bunker of Punk Rock” Spillers of Los Federales, and Matt (“the secret brain” of the Resonars). The demo was so-so. I craved the type of musical punishment and reward that the Weird Lovemakers heaped high on my plate. Melodic mania. Rough knuckled, oddly voiced dork rock that kicked ass over throwback, cutout punk. Then out came the first Knockout Pills self-titled record. Through some magic of mastering or re-recording, songs like “Reject Button” leg swept me. I’d stare at the ceiling and sing along in praise that the magical sand and grit of Tucson punk rock was once again on the ascension. With each successive spin of that record, it became apparent that I wasn’t dealing with a band with just a chop or two or a band with a couple of good songs in a cat box of turds. The whole record was chops layered on top of one another, rhythms hidden in the cupboard, melodies in the gutter, choruses flying from the heavens like Lawn Darts to right between my eyes. I’d just have to sit and listen to that album, and it never failed to drop another veil. “Oh, la, la, what a voluptuous motherfucker of sound,” I said. Then 1+1=Ate comes out. Take all of the “you’ve got to listen for ‘em” stealth chops and, somehow, polish ‘em so they’re right there—luminescent gems on first listen, yet deep and dazzling enough to warrant compulsive playing—like you’re listening to something that makes you feel musically richer. They added more power. They added more confidence, and what you’ve got is one of the unabashedly best records to come out of 2004 that won’t be toppled from my top ten list. I don’t even want compare them to other bands. I’ll just say if you like what Razorcake covers as a whole, trust me on this.  –todd (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS:
Demo: CD
The Knockout Pills are comprised of former or current members of the Weird Lovemakers and Los Federales. They’re every bit as energetic and fun as the Weird Lovemakers or Los Federales (or any of those great Tucson bands like the Fells or the Okmoniks), but the Knockout Pills also have a dose of clean rock’n’roll that sets them apart. There’s four songs on this demo. All total, it’s about eight minutes long, and, as far as I’m concerned, that’s about an hour too short. Damn, I hope they record a full-length and someone puts it out. They’re fucking awesome live, too. –sean (Knockout Pills)


KNOCKOUT PILLS:
1 + 1= Ate: CD
The first time I heard the Knockout Pills—an unreleased pre-mastered version—I was kinda doubtful. See, I love, love, loved the Weird Lovemakers and when they split up, the lead singer and one of the main song writers went to different corners (a bookstore and SF, to be exact.) Jason “Part of the Problem” Willis, the guitarist, and Gerrard (otherwise known as “Wallaby, Wallaby Dingo”) of the Weird Lovemakers joined up with Travis “the Archie Bunker of Punk Rock” Spillers of Los Federales, and Matt (“the secret brain” of the Resonars). The demo was so-so. I craved the type of musical punishment and reward that the Weird Lovemakers heaped high on my plate. Melodic mania. Rough knuckled, oddly voiced dork rock that kicked ass over throwback, cutout punk. Then out came the first Knockout Pills self-titled record. Through some magic of mastering or re-recording, songs like “Reject Button” leg swept me. I’d stare at the ceiling and sing along in praise that the magical sand and grit of Tucson punk rock was once again on the ascension. With each successive spin of that record, it became apparent that I wasn’t dealing with a band with just a chop or two or a band with a couple of good songs in a cat box of turds. The whole record was chops layered on top of one another, rhythms hidden in the cupboard, melodies in the gutter, choruses flying from the heavens like Lawn Darts to right between my eyes. I’d just have to sit and listen to that album, and it never failed to drop another veil. “Oh, la, la, what a voluptuous motherfucker of sound,” I said. Then 1+1=Ate comes out. Take all of the “you’ve got to listen for ‘em” stealth chops and, somehow, polish ‘em so they’re right there—luminescent gems on first listen, yet deep and dazzling enough to warrant compulsive playing—like you’re listening to something that makes you feel musically richer. They added more power. They added more confidence, and what you’ve got is one of the unabashedly best records to come out of 2004 that won’t be toppled from my top ten list. I don’t even want compare them to other bands. I’ll just say if you like what Razorcake covers as a whole, trust me on this. –todd (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1+1=Ate: CD
Sweet, solid punk rock from a band mining the same territory as the Marked Men, but with their own indelible stamp. Sometimes I hear snatches of early Beatles buried somewhere in the structure of their back up vocals, which is just a tad unnerving every time I detect it. On the whole, I'd have to say that this was some pretty rockin’ stuff here. –jimmy (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1 + 1 = Ate: CD
For a long time we Tucson folk were making the KO Pills live up to earlier local superstar bands they are former members of. The Pills must be tired of that, so they made an amazing album to make us forget the oldies. Catchy, jumpy, rad songs you can pogo to or cry in your bedroom over. Lots of snot dripping on the song writing, lots of melody in the rawkness, this is not a young band trying to figure it out but four guys with a lot of music under their belts. The teacher made an album the students can love. –mike (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1+1=Ate: CD
In the Hinterlands—and possibly in other areas of the world as well, though i cannot say with any certainty—there is a certain state of mind one can settle into on the weekend, in the time period after Daylight Savings Time has been revoked, but before Spring (or Daylight Savings Time, whichever comes first—i kinda forget), when there is really no impetus to leave the house (although you will, occasionally, exit the home for some manner of brief walk or something, just to see what it’s like out there), and one has been sitting around the house all afternoon, playing records, and, for want of a better term, “rocking out” all day. I mean, for a while there, you’re the King Of The World (Or At Least The Living Room)—you’re cranking records at maximum volume, chugging caffeinated beverages—i mean, why not? It’s Winter so there’s nothin’ else to do today!—basically living like a pig in shit, simply because there’s no reason to go outside, so, strangely, you’re “free” from having to do anything but sit inside and crank tunes. Anyway, maybe you’ve been drinking all day—perhaps you’ve had a tussle with the halflings’ leaf—perhaps you’re just messed up on Diet Coke™ with Lime—but, sooner or later, the sun is gonna start going down, and you’re gonna need to eat supper—so, you realize that your more or less uninterrupted state of sitting on the couch ROCKING THE FUCK OUT is going to be broken up by the physical necessity of you having to get up, turn lights on, make some supper, get ready to do whatever it is that you have to do that night (that by that time you don’t really feel like doing), etc.—so, basically, the last album you play before the light fails, and nature forces you to take a break from the state in which you have found such joy—rocking out on the couch in the daylight—has got to be a certain, special kind of album; an album that is conducive to listening to it during the last failing minutes of daylight; an album that will somewhat quietly announce that Phase One of the day is over, and the listener must now get dressed, make supper, and solidify his plans for The Night; and, most importantly, an album that enhances the experience of looking at the little green and red lights on the stereo, because that’s what ya do when the sun goes down: Start noticing what the little lights on the stereo look like in the gloom. It is my opinion that 1+1=Ate is such an album (i cannot say with any certainty as Daylight Savings Time will extend for four more weeks as of the time of this writing). On the one hand, this is a good thing, as a Last-Song-Before-The-Light-Fails album has a certain specific masterfulness to it that stimulates the listener, yet allows them to sort of thoughtfully muse on the Great Deeper Meaning of the lights on the stereo as well. On the other hand, to have the album sit in abeyance until the waning moments of sunlight also betrays a certain non-immediacy, because, i mean, if the album grabbed us by the nards and socked us in the forehead, wouldn’t we have played it more around 1 PM than waiting ‘til the sun was almost down to spin it? Be that as it may, i am virtually certain that this album will be a virtual colossus in the “fading-daylight” genre, and it sounds like the spring-wound blast of early Heart Attack (hold the Jesse Malin germs), with the Dickies on the far left of their spectrum and the Armitage Shanks on the right. In light of current recording techniques that yield loud, “good” sounding records with no personality whatsoever, i’m down with the 4-track production—however, if Lou Reed was right when he said that “cymbals eat guitars,” there are likely a whole buncha Zildjians sitting around the Knockout Pills’ practice space belching, picking their teeth, and scratching their necks whenever a new, inexplicably emptied guitar case makes itself manifest. All in all, a Fading Daylight album is likely the most difficult type of album to successfully mastermind—thus do i consider myself officially knocked out. At this time i suggest you hold a mirror beneath my nose and check for condensation. BEST SONG: “Summertime Rundown” BEST SONG TITLE: “Stab Wound Baby” or “Wait for the Apex” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT; Throwing out the low score (“Target H,” first song, 2:00) and the high score (“Wait for the Apex,” last song, 4:39), the other ten songs are all between 2:15 and 2:36 in length. –norb (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1+1=Ate: CD
Sweet, solid punk rock from a band mining the same territory as the Marked Men, but with their own indelible stamp. Sometimes I hear snatches of early Beatles buried somewhere in the structure of their back up vocals, which is just a tad unnerving every time I detect it. On the whole, I’d have to say that this was some pretty rockin’ stuff here. –jimmy (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1+1=Ate: CD
Oh yes, this does rock! Totally amazing punk rock from Tucson, Arizona! Take classic pop and rock melodies and add garage punk frenzy! This CD even made me dance around in my room like a fool—at eight in the morning! If you don’t like this, then you don’t like rock and roll! If this were a cereal, it’d be Rice Krispie Treats. (Yes, it does exist as a cereal!) You’d think, “This is gonna be generic garage rock/Rice Krispies,” but then you realize, it’s so much better than that because… it’s congealed with marshmallows! Yum! –Maddy (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1+1=Ate: CD
If you saw the interview of this band in issue fifteen, you know that this band is well liked at HQ. That doesn’t mean everybody thinks alike and has the same taste. That would mean that we are robots who only like what we are programmed to like. I admit that a lot of bands the other writers like do not suit my tastes and vice versa, but there is overlapping. Here is another case of it. I did not go out of my way to check out this band after seeing them profiled in the mag. Eight issues later, I get a CD to review. Cool stuff here. Garage punk that goes straight to the gonads with tinges of psychedelia and a surf beat. As soon as the music came pouring out of the speakers, I wanted to start shaking violently. Whoo! What fun! The song “Summertime Rundown” is my fave here. Catchy with the tongue-in-cheek female background vocals make for a song that stays on the mind for a long time. With so many bands recording on ProTools these days (mine included), it’s refreshing to hear someone record on a four-track and get great results. –don (Estrus)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
Self-titled: LP
Sometimes, it’s hard for me to let go. I know, I know, The Weird Lovemakers are done. They’ve fractured: one guy actually getting a girlfriend, the Radio Reelers, and The Knockout Pills. Whereas the Weird Lovemakers were, gloriously, all over the map, the Knockout Pills have their feet steadfastly planted in harmony-rich ‘60s rock, like The Zombies and The Animals. While these guys have a healthy dose of respect to give the songs a true charge, they aren’t so respectful that it seems like a merely coloring in of existing musical shapes. Nuts get kicked. Instruments get whacked. So, yeah, there’s some understandable similarity to the New Bomb Turks, but not too much to think these guys don't have brains and extensive record collections of their own. Ultimately, what’s pleasant about this LP is how listenable it is. When it gets mellow and a harmonica gets broken out in “Confused,” it burns slowly without getting sleepy. When they pick it up, your ear gets humped. Not to sound like Leonard Nimoy narrating In Search Of…, but as a dawn that casts long shadows slowly gives away to mid day, when a band has to stand up by themselves regardless of their predecessors, The Knockout Pills pull out their own revolvers, and prove themselves. Although the album didn’t stun me right off the bat, with each successive listen, it gets deeper and stronger. Enthusiastic thumbs up. –todd (Dead Beat)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
Self-titled: LP
This righteous debut album from Tucson’s now defunct Knockout Pills is a must have. Every member of this band was at the top of their game for this one. High energy rock’n’roll at its finest. It’s hard to believe Matt recorded this on a 4-track. Solid. –Matthew Hart (Dead Beat)


KNOTS:
Heartbreaker: 7”
Yet another obscure band gets the reissue treatment, but in this case it’s more than warranted and welcomed. Title track is a driving, fan-fucking-tastic bit of punk/rock with a bit of synth dropped in at strategic points. The flip, “Action,” has cleaner channel guitars and is maybe a hair slower than the other tune, but the delivery is just as tight. –jimmy (Last Laugh)


KNOW MASSIVE:
Mood Swing Set: CD
With their mellow, trip-hop vibe, they’re a tad reminiscent of Portishead (who they sample on at least one song), and the MC flowing across the top has a smooth delivery that compliments the backing track nicely. While this doesn’t immediately set the barn a-burnin’, I know it’s gonna grow on me pretty darn quick. –jimmy (www.moodswingrecords.com)


KNOW SECRETS:
Self-titled: 12” EP
Know Secrets is a melodic punk trio from San Francisco. There is a lot of sound going on here for only three people. Maybe one of them has an extra arm or foot? Freaks! The male-female harmonies are tight. The rhythm section does not let up for a second. The guitar work is wonderfully simple and complex at the same time; it gets the job done while allowing for little surprises here and there. You can add Know Secrets to the long list of reasons why San Francisco is the coolest fucking city in the world.  –John Mule (301 Collective)


KNOWLTON BOURNE:
Songs from Motel 43: CD
I know nothing about this motel. I do know that this solo artist hails from Mississippi and is in his early twenties. I can also take a wild guess that he has never read an issue of this magazine. But maybe his press agent mailed this release to HQ. The songwriting is definitely capable. Fans of Steve Earle and Wilco may find some music here that excites them. I doubt that most readers of this magazine will feel the same. –Sean Koepenick (Misra, misrarecords.com)


KNOXVILLE GIRLS:
In A Paper Suit: CD
No, not literally a paper suit like Issey Miyake circa 1983. Knoxville Girls are the oily, shitcan-kicked cowbluesrock trifecta of a crazy little art form called "music." Do you ever feel like this whole stupid fuckin' thing called life is finally alright as you speed down the highway in the middle of the California desert with all your friends passed out, 5 o'clock in the morning? You're cranked up on a week's paycheck's worth of good blow, reminiscing about the people who fucked you and left you behind while chain smoking Saratoga cigarettes and taking liberal sips of some cheap beer in a can. What's the band you wanna hear on that car stereo of yours that has auto-reverse but doesn't play the other side on the right speed? This scenario would not be complete without a truck stop meal and Knoxville Girls blaring out of the car with the windows completely down. This is a five man powerhouse collective of veterans who need no introduction in this game; Jerry Teel, Bob Bert, Jack Martin, Kid Congo Powers and Barry London - some of the projects that these gentlemen have been involved with at one point or another include Sonic Youth, Honeymoon Killers, The Cramps, Gun Club, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, Chrome Cranks, and Pussy Galore. This album is the must-have release of 2001. Excellent Hank Williams, Hasil Adkins and The Shangri-La's covers. –nam (In The Red)


KNUCKLEHEAD:
Little Boots: CD
About five or six years ago, I got a Knucklehead 7" to review for Flipside. I loved that 7". I taped it and some other new seven-inchers that I'd gotten at the time (Dillinger Four's More Songs about Girlfriends and Bubblegum, the Chubbies, and Boris the Sprinkler). I listened to that tape all the time, and never heard about Knucklehead again after it. I knew they were from Canada and on Far Out Records, which went belly-up shortly after that. I just figured that Knucklehead had vanished. Then, I saw this in the recent review pile and snatched it up. On my first listen, I was surprised to hear two of the four songs from that long ago 7". I looked closer and saw that this was a re-release of their first album (which had originally been released by Far Out). Man, I wish I'd found this album five years ago. A lot of the territory Knucklehead cover here has been covered and overdone since this album was originally released. I'm kinda tired of anthemic street punk and anything that shows a Rancid influence, and that's pretty much what this Knucklehead album is, but damn it, these guys still do it well. It's fun to sing along with. There's a lot of hooks. And, really, they've gone beyond being about their influences and forged their own sound. It's good stuff. If I'd reviewed it when it originally came out, though, I'd've been going nuts. –sean (Longshot)


KNUCKLEHEAD:
Cosmetic Youth: 7”
This slab o’ vinyl is GREAT, GREAT, GREAT! Side A sounds a bit like the Business, minus the oi and add some more rockin’. Side B reminds me of something the 101’ers could have done. Not only is the music amazing, but the band gets an A+ on lyrics. If you love 7”s as much as I do, please, please go pick this up. You will thank me for it. I’ve cast my vote for the BEST 7” OF 2004, for sure! –mrz (Longshot Music)


KNUCKLEHEAD:
Little Boots: CD
About five or six years ago, I got a Knucklehead 7” to review for Flipside. I loved that 7”. I taped it and some other new seven-inchers that I’d gotten at the time (Dillinger Four’s More Songs about Girlfriends and Bubblegum, the Chubbies, and Boris the Sprinkler). I listened to that tape all the time, and never heard about Knucklehead again after it. I knew they were from Canada and on Far Out Records, which went belly-up shortly after that. I just figured that Knucklehead had vanished. Then, I saw this in the recent review pile and snatched it up. On my first listen, I was surprised to hear two of the four songs from that long ago 7”. I looked closer and saw that this was a re-release of their first album (which had originally been released by Far Out). Man, I wish I’d found this album five years ago. A lot of the territory Knucklehead cover here has been covered and overdone since this album was originally released. I’m kinda tired of anthemic street punk and anything that shows a Rancid influence, and that’s pretty much what this Knucklehead album is, but damn it, these guys still do it well. It’s fun to sing along with. There’s a lot of hooks. And, really, they’ve gone beyond being about their influences and forged their own sound. It’s good stuff. If I’d reviewed it when it originally came out, though, I’d’ve been going nuts. –sean (Longshot)


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