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K, THE:
Burning Pattern Etiquette: CD
The ten songs and thirty-nine minutes of music on this album is what happens if the Blood Brothers and Pissed Jeans had a baby and raised it in Belgium. The lyrics are all in English, but the vocalist’s accent helps the sound to stand out amongst a crowd of bands that might otherwise be too similar. There’s a darker bass sound that creates dissonance, but not in a way that is distracting. Instead, it makes me curious and wanting to get a closer listen. There’s an anger and frustration just below the surface that doesn’t emerge much but is instead diverged into a brooding angst. I can dig it.  –Kurt Morris (JauneOrange, jauneorange.be)


K-9 CHAOS:
For the Good of the Nation: CD
Swedish, punk, and political? This has served me well in the past, really well. And something tells me that K-9 Chaos dig the same bands that I do, namely Randy and their classic You Can’t Keep a Good Band Down. The standard melodic pop punk is there, along with the overtly political lyrics. But the best part of this album is the sweet comic book cover, which shows the band backed up against a wall about to fight a mean lookin’ group of robots and monsters. The packaging and production of this album is extremely high quality, considering these guys released it themselves. I have the feeling that a fifteen year old would get a kick out of this album. –Guest Contributor (Dog Fight, www.k-9chaos.com)


K-HOLES:
Self-titled: LP
Sounds like this would be the perfect soundtrack for a David Lynch film, where everything goes horribly weird and wrong, existing just this side of hell. Think of a microwaved Birthday Party and Scratch Acid, with some garage rock thrown in. Plodding and lurching, pianos for atmosphere, and is that a clarinet I hear? This music doesn’t beat you over the head to get your attention. Instead, it requires a longer attention span and pulls you in with its seductive dark side. Allowing yourself to do so pays off. “Step N Fetch” is nearly poppy, contrasted with the song “Native Tongues” like “Swamp Fire,” which oozes and plods all at once. This is racking up miles on the turntable in these later summer days. –Matt Average (Hozac, hozacrecords.com)


K-JELL:
Refreshing K-Jell Power: CD
Norway’s K-Jell on the “East meets West” Norwegian/Chinese label October Party are a mind numbingly catchy, poppy punk band that is one of the best kept secrets of our time. It’s downright alarming that an instant classic like Refreshing K-Jell Power can be relatively unknown, at least stateside. K-Jell is sort of what D4 would sound like if they had some streetpunk influences. Brilliant. Just plain fucking brilliant. –Art Ettinger (October Party)


K-JELL:
People Like Us in a Pretty Pink World: CD
If you like fairly crappy punk rock, you should get this CD. If you don’t, then you shouldn’t. Nothing really stands out among the ten songs here. It is noted that this CD was recorded in Norway. So I’m assuming these guys are European, unless the Norway thing is merely coincidental. –Nighthawk (October Party, October_Party_Records@hotmail.com)


K-JELL:
You Can’t Kill Rock ‘N’ Roll: CD
K-Jell puts the title statement to the test on this disc. Thankfully, it takes more than drooling ballads about how “this is the real me” or how “this is what it’s all about” to kill rock’n’roll. The addition of butt loads of too clean, grade school guitar solos almost did it, but not quite. Nice try though, guys. –mp (October Party)


K-LINE:
Lessons Learned But Ignored: CD-EP
Judging by the cover photo depicting the drummer wearing a DS-13 shirt, I thought this would be some blistering thrash band, but it turned out to be a totally decent melodic hardcore band. Not a great melodic hardcore band, but decent. These ears hear neato guitar lines and no horse gallop drums, but also epic song lengths (all five songs are over 2:30) and an entire band that really wants to put the pedal to the floor and explode all over the place but holds back for some reason. If these guys shaved off the fat and picked up the pace a ton, they would be really good, but as it stands they just aren't doing anything for me. -Not Josh –Staff (Does Everyone Stare?)


K-LINE:
Lessons Learned But Ignored: CDEP
Judging by the cover photo depicting the drummer wearing a DS-13 shirt, I thought this would be some blistering thrash band, but it turned out to be a totally decent melodic hardcore band. Not a great melodic hardcore band, but decent. These ears hear neato guitar lines and no horse gallop drums, but also epic song lengths (all five songs are over 2:30) and an entire band that really wants to put the pedal to the floor and explode all over the place but holds back for some reason. If these guys shaved off the fat and picked up the pace a ton, they would be really good, but as it stands they just aren’t doing anything for me. –Not Josh –Guest Contributor (Does Everyone Stare?)


K., THE:
My Flesh Reveals Millions of Souls: CD
Noisy, wiry, and ready to split up into a million pieces. Looping bass lines, manic drums fills and vocals that go from a whisper to a howl at the drop of a hat. Guitars that could cause puncture wounds. “Dawn Riser” and “Maneater” are my favorites on this record. It’s heavy, sure, but there are dynamics here too. This trio from Brussels channels McLusky, Big Black, and Drive Like Jehu into a potent cocktail. Take a swig.  –koepenick (Juane Orange)


KA-KNIVES, THE:
“Weasel” b/w “Dear Dad”: 7"
In the spirit of Supercharger and the Oblivians, the equation’s as predictable as it is effective. Take low-fi, kick some dirt on it, record it through a boom box (or whatever sounds like one), and kick it in the nads a couple more times, so you don’t know if it’s limping or staggering. If you did it right, it’s the audio equivalent to duct-taped instruments, fractured cymbals, and microphones with cracked cords. Here are two covers: one by Joe and the Furies, and one by Chuck Berry. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t like it. On drums and vocals is Matt of the dearly missed Jewws (of which the Ka-Knives are a reasonable outreach from) and Junior Varsity (which this is pretty far afield from). –todd (Lance Rock)


KA-NIVES, THE:
Get Duped: LP
Me like oog music. Me no like think rock. Me no like Volvo commercial rock. Me like Fred Flinstone’s car. Me like furry underwear on go go dancers and ribs so big they tip over the car at the drive-in. Me like Supercharger, Gories, King Kahn and BBQ. Me like music that when it’s swiped with something sharp, it bleeds instead of asks for a credit card number. Me like music that’s raw and booger-eatin’ and has an exhaust leak that gives me a carbon monoxide high. (Me too dumb to die.) Do The Mummies have boogers? If they did, the Ka-Nives would eat those Mummie boogers from all of their noses and steal the Mummies songs in the process, using the uneaten boogers as sheet music. This album’s all covers, and I won’t lie; if they would have said, “All originals, chump,” I’d of believed ‘em, except for “Nervous Breakdown”—no, not that Rise Against song from Lords of Dogtown… or Black Flag… before that—which is great oog music, too. LP limited to 300. Comes with booklet with nice pictures, so no have to read much. –todd (Lance Rock)


KAAOS:
Ristiinnaulittu Kaaos: LP
I don’t know if it’s all that snow or what, but the Scandinavians have got the market cornered in the western hemisphere when it comes to consistently amazing hardcore releases. Twenty-plus years and, as evidenced by bands like Krigshot and Rajoitus, most countries still can’t come close to matching the chaotic bliss that comes outta the frostbitten European north. Don’t believe me? Pop this puppy, a reissue of a classic from 1984, onto the turntable, crank up the volume and prepare to have your ears gouged by some of the best noise ever associated with the word “punk.” This record is rife with fjordcore fury, as punishing as it was two decades ago and, as if the original tracks weren’t enough, three additional tracks have been tacked on to up the ante. Give this bad boy a place of reverence in your collection, sandwiched between tattered Terveet Kadet, Rattus, and Riisteyt releases, and just wish you were in a band that friggin’ good. –jimmy (Havoc)


KABUKI THUNDER:
Go to Hell: 7"
In a club that still allows smoking, sawdust on the floor, and down in a basement in some metropolitan city, you walk in to a smell of stale beer and dried vomit. This band will come on and play MC5-meets-the-Stooges style Detroit rock that can also be described as sounding a little like the Antiseen. –don (Self-released)


KABUKI THUNDER:
Go to Hell: 7"
In a club that still allows smoking, sawdust on the floor, and down in a basement in some metropolitan city, you walk in to a smell of stale beer and dried vomit. This band will come on and play MC5-meets-the-Stooges style Detroit rock that can also be described as sounding a little like the Antiseen. –don (Kabuki Thunder)


KADDISFLY:
Buy Our Intention; We’ll Buy You a Unicorn: CD
My husband put this CD in and our conversation went along the lines of… Me: What are you listening to? Hubby: The new release off Hopeless. Me: Ugh, I should have figured. Hubby: Maybe your little brother would like this. Me: Yeah, probably. (As a side note, my youngest brother is fourteen and in the eighth grade. We normally don’t give him crap music to listen to, as he is still easily influenced, but we thought we’d humor his current taste in emo/indie rock à la MTV. Really, he’s a good kid. Just a bit musically confused, as many of us were at that age.) –Staff (Hopeless)


KADDISFLY:
Buy Our Intention; We’ll Buy You a Unicorn: CD
Christian rock without the distraction of a deity, which is surprising due to their God-awfulness. –megan (Hopeless)


KADDISH:
Thick Letters to Friends: LP
Haven’t come across anything quite like this before. I can best describe the Scottish band Kaddish as post-pop hardcore punk (still with me?) with frenetic melodic guitar and the echoes of traditional Scottish music (with a possible tinge of Mission Of Burma influence throughout). Lax, melodious guitar quickly finds itself into hardcore throw downs, then back again. The change-ups really had me guessing what’s next. At times, they had me wandering aimlessly. Emo-screamo, torn vocals drenched in desperation added uneasiness to their overall sound—as well as the vocals never quite synching with the melodies. It all seemed a bit off kilter, but after a few listens it became more cohesive (as I find this the case when listening to more complex and unusual music).  –Camylle Reynolds (Make-That-A-Take, makethatatakerecords.bandcamp / Black Lake/ The Ghost Is Clear / Boslevan)


KAITO:
You've Seen Us...: CD
Art damaged pop. Enough noise is pumped into it to make it abrasive, yet it still retains enough pop sensibility to make it hummable. Should go over well with the more adventurous KROQ crowd. –jimmy (Devil in the Woods, PO Box 579168, Modesto, CA 95357)


KAITO:
You: CD
Art damaged pop. Enough noise is pumped into it to make it abrasive, yet it still retains enough pop sensibility to make it hummable. Should go over well with the more adventurous KROQ crowd. –jimmy (Devil in the Woods)


KAJUN SS:
$40 Quartet: 7”
My expectations were too high coming from members of The Persuaders, but this deepsouthernpunkrock gives you what you need in guitar and demolished tin-shed vocals. If it was playing from the window of a passing ¾ ton pickup, I would turn and look for sure. –mike (Shattered, www.geocities.com/shatteredrecs)


KAKISTOCRACY:
Self-titled: LP
It has been a while since I heard something from this band. The last thing was the And So You Spill Your Children’s Blood... 7” that was released on Ponk 111 and a couple of other labels. I believe it was released late 2000 or 2001. The band seems to have grown greatly. The musicianship and writing are much more complicated and they have gained a conscious control of their aggression. With the integration of more guitar harmonies, they have added texture and layers to their music. The songs are intricate enough to keep this listener attentive and not in a state of monotony. They continue on with their brand of anarcho/crust that is fierce and dark. The metallic riffing is what makes the music come out screaming. Loud guitars and precise drumming makes this all come together with lyrics that are intelligent, yet poetic in their delivery. I enjoyed this one from start to finish and have listened to it more than a few times. –don (Profane Existence)


KAKISTOCRACY:
Self-Titled: LP
It has been a while since I heard something from this band. The last thing was the And So You Spill Your Children’s Blood... 7” that was released on Ponk 111 and a couple of other labels. I believe it was released late 2000 or 2001. The band seems to have grown greatly. The musicianship and writing are much more complicated and they have gained a conscious control of their aggression. With the integration of more guitar harmonies, they have added texture and layers to their music. The songs are intricate enough to keep this listener attentive and not in a state of monotony. They continue on with their brand of anarcho/crust that is fierce and dark. The metallic riffing is what makes the music come out screaming. Loud guitars and precise drumming makes this all come together with lyrics that are intelligent, yet poetic in their delivery. I enjoyed this one from start to finish and have listened to it more than a few times. –don (Profane Existence)


KAKISTOCRACY:
An Apology: 7"
It’s been a while since I listened to this band on their early EP And So You Spilled Your Children’s Blood on Ponk 111 and the full length that was released a couple of years ago on Profane Existence. An easy and a common reference for this band is that they fall into the anarcho crust camp. But they also seem to have an underlying infusion of melody that makes the music operatic and epic while maintaining the energy of their metallic punk sound. Taking the standard and adding a bit of themselves into the music sets it above the generic. Three songs seem to be a tease but, in reality, is enough to get the dose without being overbearing. Listening to this release, I’m glad to hear that they continue to progress and get better from release to release. If you are looking around, it’s also co-released by Rust and Machine and Halo Of Flies.  –don (Humdinger)


KAKISTOCRACY / NUX VOMICA:
Split: 7"
Two of the best names in state-side melodic crust come together for one epic battle of a split 7”. I’d like to think that this 7” was so crushing on both sides that there could be no survivors because in typical crust fashion everyone would be annihilated, but I’m going to have to go with Nux Vomica as the victors. Both bands definitely put their all into it, but the charging tempo changes and fierce back up vocals throughout their side of the 7” assured them a small, yet influential, lead to triumph.  –Daryl Gussin (Humdinger/To Live A Lie)


KAKKA-HÄTÄ 77:
Totaalinen Kakkahätä: CD
I almost refuse to use this term when it comes to reviewing bands, mainly because it’s almost meaningless but also because it’s used so poorly sometimes, but I think it’s a pretty dead on statement to make that Finland’s Kakka-hätä 77 is KBD material, and I may be one more asshole using that in a review, but whatever. This CD contains the music from the two 7”s this band has released. Angelic Upstarts and early Clash played much pubbier, with lots of hooky backing vocals and a healthy helping of punky goodness. The artwork on the front is a black and white illustration of a gutter punk cross country skiing through a moonlit forest and the back is even funnier. I read on the internet that this CD debuted at #15 on the Finnish charts and the label is totally baffled that people like it so much. Fucking cool. –Daryl Gussin (Combat Rock)


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