Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

FEELERS, THE/BLANK ITS:
Split: 7”
Rad split featuring two bands that have generated quite a bit of a buzz in a very short amount of time. The Feelers have me kicking myself for not picking up their earlier 7”. Fast, hard-hitting, guitar-driven punk that sounds like a lost early-‘80s Midwest hardcore band. More evidence that Ohio is an often-overlooked hotbed of rock and roll. Folks who dig the first Baseball Furies album will find much to like here. Vocally, the Blank Its remind me of the guy from Servotron singing underwater. Musically, they play really twisted lo-fi stuff that’s not exactly easy to categorize but would fit in between your A Frames and Spits records. Addictive hooks, too. Pick up a copy quick because these might not be around too long. –Josh (Contaminated)


FAILURES UNION, THE:
You Know Who: CD

Let me be straight with all of you. When I saw a CD from a three-piece from Buffalo, I was praying to God there was no Supertramp cover on it. Luckily my prayers were answered. This trio’s debut was a wide smile surprise. Tight arrangements, nice harmonies and lyrics that may make you pause for a few moments of reflection. Remember when songs from Bob Mould, Evan Dando (at least before he started hittin’ the pipe), or even Buffalo Tom made you stop and think? This is what You Know Who brings to mind. “I Feel the Same Songs about Her” sings about those dark nights we’ve probably all had—“that’s all right/I can see your breath/’cuz we don’t spring for heat.” “You’re the Coyote” chugs along with a chorus of “persistence is futile/I’ve learned that from you/the sheep run for shelter when you make the room,” before kicking into a revved-up guitar solo. Out of nowhere, a stellar debut that doesn’t sound like Interpol. Hooray!

–koepenick (Art of the Underground)


EXPLOITED, THE:
Horror Epics: CD
Oh, to be getting so old. The reissues keep coming out of the woodwork. My crusty friend Jim, who used to sing for the band Blown to Bits, loved this band. When he lived with me and my brother back in the mid-‘80s, all he would play was the Exploited, UK Subs, or Chaos UK. In retaliation I would play Fuzzbox, Strawberry Switchblade, or Madonna all the time. Fuzzbox on a hangover can be quite annoying. I never did buy this record since Jim owned it and played it all too often. I believe it was released domestically on the metal label Combat. I thought I had no recollection of what this record sounded like. That was wrong. It was ingrained in the back of my brain. As soon as the opening chords of the title track came out of the speakers, I remembered every note of this experimental, tribal number. As songs played, I remembered words and phrases of the songs throughout. I’m appreciative that this came my way. It brings back memories of time long past that will always be cherished. This is also a reminder that the Exploited put out good records in the past, compared to their latest output titled Fuck the System. That was a joke. –don (S.O.S.)


EVENS, THE:
Self-titled: CD
I’m not quite sure how it works, but Ian MacKaye is one of the few musicians I’m willing to follow virtually anywhere—this time, into a subdued duet with Amy Farina (the drummer for the Warmers)—and be pleased by what I’d wouldn’t traditionally give a second listen. Perhaps it’s the warmth of the songs. Perhaps there are more times in my life now where I’m looking for a little less chaos and a little more steeping time. Perhaps it’s the chemistry of having not being steered wrong under Ian’s musical auspices. Perhaps I’m a little more accepting of the idea that rage, although informative, can be less powerful than a whisper at the right time. It’s a quiet, steady, giving album that would be hard pressed to be further way from the blast of the Teen Idles and Minor Threat… yet I’m grateful and happy that both exist. –todd (Dischord)


ENEMY YOU:
Stories Never Told: CD
I had been waiting for this album since I caught wind that they had recorded it in 2002. Yet years and years passed and Panic Button never released it, as was the original plan. As rumors have it, Lookout (who runs Panic Button) had made some shady deal or another involving an Enemy You song being licensed to Disney for promotion on their Boy in the Bubble movie, and the band not only did not see any of that money, but that same money was never put into releasing their album, as one would assume it would. I don’t know the whole story, and like I said, it’s all rumors and hearsay, but in the end the band decided to take matters into their own hands and brought the album to see the light of day via a brand new label, Redscare Records. And I couldn’t be happier. There is not one song on here I would fast forward through and it’s all what I’ve come to expect from the band: amazing personal/political pop punk greatness. Highly recommended. –mrz (Redscare)


EMOK:
Shove Your Head into the Ground and Feed It to the Earth: CD
I’m not sure what I think about this one, but I think that’s good. It seems like it’s bridging a no-longer-distant gap between between arty-leaning hardcore and a Korn-wannabe band, so upon first listen I immediately reached for my can of anti-art pesticide spray and a cudgel. But I think the blurring of lines is a good and healthy thing and should be encouraged. Categorization is something that should be pounded into the dirt like a bag full of wriggling maggots. Plus, there’s actually something on this disc that sounds musical to my ears and that’s rare for self-aware crossbreeds of this sort. A bit studied for my thick-skulled tastes, but all in all not bad. I hope this doesn’t mean I’m getting soft. –aphid (Wrong)


DRUNKEN BOAT/ BENT OUTTA SHAPE:
Split: 7”
Drunken Boat: wide-eyed DIY punk in the vein of Allergic to Bullshit and This Is My Fist, where the lady vocalist rasps like she’s got carpet burns on her larynx and sounds like all the instruments were bought at the same garage sale. Nothing wrong with that. That said, they’re a little standard, but their enthusiasm’s infectious. Bent Outta Shape: Feels like the tip of a deep iceburg, like listening to just three early Replacements songs off of Stink. You absolutely know that there’s some deep, fun, drunk shit going on and this is just a great start. Includes an acoustic ditty that’s neck and neck with the material on The Tim Version’s country 10”. Man, oh man. –todd (Drunk Tank)


DRAGOS, LOS:
Self-titled: CD
I’m a sucker for trashy, reverb-drenched garage rock. Growing up on Mudhoney and finding bands like the Mummies, the Black Lips, the Sonics, New Bomb Turks, and a slew of others only reinforces the scummy pride this shit exudes. Wanky guitar solos are ruling on this fifteen-song sludge fest. Good to drink or drop acid to. These Italians probably admire the 13th Floor Elevators and Mark Arm. Makes you feel raunchy. I dig it! –Buttertooth (Nicotine)


DOG ASSASSIN:
Self-titled: 7”
Uppity activist rock that comes in a nice hand-sewn cloth cover that I’ll be able to use as a hot pad whenever I make my White Castle and Hot Dog casserole. Ah, just kidding. I’m sure these dumpster diving vegan kids are well meaning as all get up, but sometimes this ossified über-earnestness makes me want to shove a flute up my ass and fart out a Clay Aiken tune while I walk on my hands. Don’t get me wrong; these are serious subjects, to be sure, but I don’t necessarily want a hot coffee colonic each time I drop the needle down on a record. Bands like the Dead Kennedys and MDC proved long ago that it’s possible for a chippy punk band to tackle serious social issues without all that damn gravity. I was hoping that, with a name like “Dog Assassin” that this would be a lot funnier. Sorry, I guess I’m just not feeling all that serious this month. –aphid (Spacement)


DIE ROTZZ:
Tugboat 45: 7”
Decent enough thud-punk here. Doesn’t set the barn a-burnin’ or anything, but it’ll do the trick in a pinch. –jimmy (Die Slaughterhaus)


DEXATEENS, THE:
Red Dust Rising: CD
I can't believe i got assigned an Eagles album to review and it's not even the one with "Life in the Fast Lane" on it. What a rip. BEST SONG: Duh, "Life in the Fast Lane." I guess i also liked that song about having to eat your lunch all by yourself a little bit, too. BEST SONG TITLE: "Red Dust Rising," because it might be some sort of veiled reference to Kryptonite vapors. FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: "Dexateens" can be made into many interesting anagrams, such as "Sex Ed Ante," "See Ax Dent," and "Texas Eden" –norb (Estrus)


DETONATIONS:
Spy You in a Magazine: 7”
I like a lot of stuff that Big Neck puts out, so I was kind of disappointed by this record. The music is fine; they seem to be pretty talented and they come up with catchy hooks, but the songs go on long enough to turn the catchy hooks into annoying reminders that the song is still going on. And I’m not too psyched about the guys voice, either. If you want to sing like a robot, sing like a robot. Robots don’t try to hit different notes with every word. The B-side is a Chrome cover. I don’t know the original but it sounds like the A Frames but with the same guy that sang the A-side. Buy a Sweet JAP, Lost Sounds, Baseball Furies, Tyrades, or Trailer Park Tornadoes record from this label instead. –Josh (Big Neck)


DENTS, THE:
Time for Biting: CD
Female-fronted pop punk is a touchy subject for a lot of people. How do you get around that one of the most obvious parts of their music is a female voice? It smacks of being a ghetto until bands like the Dents, the Soviettes, and Beautys come along and smash that shit to bits. The voices are just the starting point, not the finish line. I posit this: The Dents have recorded the album that the Eyeliners have been shooting for for the better part of a decade. This album’s filled with super-catchy songs that don’t all blend into one another. It’s sexy without relying on being cutesy, rockin’ without being bitchy or man-hating. Everything—from the recording, to the delivery, to the song structures—is clear, raucous, sonorous, and exciting. It’s one of those records where my favorite song has changed four times until I came to the conclusion of, “Why split hairs?” This record’s an amazing debut. –todd (Abbey Lounge)


DEMON’S CLAWS:
Self-titled: CD
From Montreal comes flying an irresistible bone for the mushmouth-and-rootsfuzz camp of the Billy Childish/Dan Melchior axis (though a little more country than Childish and less Zeppelin than Melchior), with a good bit of Soledad Brothers and Bassholes chucked in for North American flavor. Best thirty-nine minutes yet this year. –Cuss Baxter (Dead Canary)


DEL PSYCHOS:
The Fajita Monologues: CD
While it would be easy (and unfair) to dismiss these guys as a pop band with more than their share of ‘60s influence, one can hear a cornucopia of different bands and sounds in there, from the early work of the Who and the Byrds to later power pop darlings like the Quick, as well as a twinge of ‘80s paisley underground, and maybe even a little bit of the Dickies thrown into them multi-part harmonies as well. A tough dance it is these days to do this stuff effectively, but they manage to do so quite well. A glance at the songwriting credits indicates these guys (or at least their guitarist/vocalist J.R. Jones) have been slogging it out for at least twenty years, and it shows. Good stuff. –jimmy (Lightning Bug)


DEL PSYCHOS:
The Fajita Monologues: CD
First thing that came to mind was this band sounds like the Monkees. The melodies are the key and they give me the same feeling I had when I first heard the Redd Kross record Third Eye. Bubblegum pop with multi-layered harmonies and a production that is super clean. Perfect soundtrack to a ‘70s romantic comedy for television. –don (Lightning Bug)


DEL CIELO:
Us Vs. Them: CD
Sleater-Kinney wannabees trying desperately to capture the sweet angst of the Corin/Carrie vocal play. And unlike the important relevance of S-K, this just sounds average and dated. –kat (Lovitt)


DEADONES U.S.A.:
There Is No Vacation: CD
Although not deplorable, the Deadones U.S.A. rely on the Bar Rock 101 handbook a bit too heavily for my tastes, from the standardized riffs, the too-often-repeated choruses, to the flat lyrics, to the “didn’t I hear this song already?” reaches to the CD player. There are ways to get around it—ways that the Loud Pipes, The Candy Snatchers, and the B-Movie Rats busted open—but this album sounds pretty much like the hundreds of bands I sit through, wishing beer prices weren’t so high, waiting for the band I came to see to take the stage. –todd (No Front Teeth)


DEAD MEADOW:
Feathers: CD
Drug rock of the 100 percent bummer variety: limp vocals echo over tepid rivers of wah and flange with very few and far between actual pieces of rock poking through. Ideally, you’d have quite a number of rocks sticking up, to improve the recreational quality of those bodies of water. –Cuss Baxter (Matador)


DARREN “DEICIDE” KRAMER:
Rockin Til the Apocalypse: CD
One man blues with whine where there should be grit. I did learn almost all possible rhymes (or close rhymes) for dumb: one, begun, everyone, overcome, cranium, become, succumb, pendulum, drum, tedium, hum, scum, done, slums, kingdom, ones. Dude, every line doesn’t have to rhyme. –megan (Ever Reviled)


DAREDIABLO:
Twenty Paces: CD
Prog rock is not normally my cup o’ tea, but this record works for me at an instinctive level, even if it does get a bit repetitive. The combo is made up of drums, keyboard, and guitar, and they can do a helluva lot with that set up. There are no vocals, so instead it’s up to the music to evoke feelings, emotions, and gut reactions, making interpretation and appreciation that much more murky and personal for the listener. Robert Frost once said that a poem changes with every reader of it, and I suspect that the same would be true of this record, but once I knew what the record said to me, I lost interest quickly. –The Lord Kveldulfr (Southern)


CRIPPLED PILGRIMS:
Down Here: Collected Recordings (1983-1985): CD

The smart folks at Reaction Recordings have given us a great gift by putting this DC outfit’s music on CD for the first time. This features both their Fountain of Youth records on one disc. Quirky polished pop with winding guitar solos that seem to jet off into the stratosphere. Stand-out tracks on the Head Down Hand Out EP include “People Going Nowhere” and “Dissolving.” “Pretend Not to Care” and “Oblivious and Numb” from the Under Water full-length are also fantastic. Scott Wingo’s guitar offers many different shades and textures on each track while Jay Mogila’s mysterious vocals portray intriguing puzzles that can’t easily be deciphered. The songs are held together by the inventive bass riffs of Mitch Parker (ex-Government Issue) and Dan Joseph rumbles away on the big kit. If you liked bands like Dumptruck or Love Tractor, Crippled Pilgrims should blow you away with these undiscovered gems.

–koepenick (Parasol)


COUP, THE:
Party Music: CD
The best hip hop gives me the same rush that hearing Black Flag for the first time did—that giddy feeling that this might be the first time anything has ever sounded this cool, the uncontrollable urge to tear a hole in the status quo. Every album I’ve heard from the Coup thus far has elicited that response. They deal in a species of rhyme that is an amalgamation of grooves deep from the Zapp vaults of funk, Public Enemy’s fearless political savvy, and punk’s incendiary assault on the power structure. Like Chuck D, rapper Boots walks the walk, never back-pedaling and always willing to say what he means. To wit, when this album was originally released in September 2001, the original cover, featuring Boots and DJ Pam the Funkstress with the twin towers of the World Trade Center exploding behind them (ostensibly through the force of their music), it was obviously one of those really unfortunate coincidences when reality decides to imitate art. Nonetheless, the album cover vaulted the group into the media spotlight, and for the next few months Boots was forced to defend both the album and his position that, given the long history of US atrocities meted out on other countries in the name of foreign policy, he was not surprised in the least that someone had decided that a little payback was in order, a sentiment that strikes at the core of the nation’s cognitive dissonance with regards to the effect of what is done in its name. Eventually the cover was changed to a less provocative cover featuring a hand holding a martini glass filled with gasoline (a Molotov cocktail, get it?), but the songs, savage attacks on the system, remained intact. Lyrically, this isn’t more fodder to further fuel the “Black man is violent and oversexed/Black woman is a whore” stereotypes that permeate mainstream, corporate hip hop, but rather yet another clarion call to the powers that be that the many at the bottom are getting plenty tired of being pissed on by the arrogant, wealthy few on top and that the time is at hand when the chickens will, indeed, come home to roost. Herein the listener will find subjects covering “5 Million Ways to Kill a CEO,” turning the system upside down, battling the rich (“This whole system works for you to kick it in Paris/or roll through Hong Kong in a Rickshaw carriage/so when you spend a dollar that’s ten seconds of my time/and when you spend a billion/that’s my life and that’s a crime/cuz for me life is hard like the track I’m reppin’ on/callin’ for the freedom of the backs that you steppin’ on”), battling the police, and being down with the underdog. Musically, this bounces hard with the best of ’em, as the Coup make music of substance that is simultaneously angry and fun, an approach that leans more towards prankster agitators like Abbie Hoffman and Crass than dour rebels who have forgotten that insurrection can be cause for celebration. Even if you haven’t a passing interest in hip hop, consider this mandatory for the collection, ’cause rebel jams this fearless are hard to come by. –jimmy (Epitaph)


COULIER:
Cool, Cooler, Coulier: CD
Three piece instrumentalists which consists of two guitarists and a drummer. A mixture of early Butthole Surfers meets Rollins Band kind of metal or grindcore twistedness. You have to have a taste for the abstract to like this one. –don (Stickfigure)


CONFORMISTS, THE:
Two Hundred: CD
Decidedly not conformists, the Conformists come on like the Shaggs confusing their Unsane and Don Caballero covers, all wacked rhythms and dissonance and weird chords. It’s like watching a goddamn Rain Man recite the first three hundred prime numbers: there’s order there, but damned if you or I would ever see it. One loopy nugget of fuggetty fugget. –Cuss Baxter (Collective)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937 938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 947 948 949 950 951 952 953 954 955 956 957 958 959 960 961 962 963 964 965 966 967 968 969 970 971 972 973 974

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player


·INSTANGD
·Junk Science #5
·VARIOUS ARTISTS
·K., THE
·VARIOUS ARTISTS
·SMOGTOWN
·UNHOLY TWO
·Southport, HDQ, Stay Clean Jolene, Holiday, John (Doublecross) by Andy Higgins
·Fight to the End


If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2015 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.