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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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TAKE MY CHANCES:
Down Here with Us: CD
These guys just come slamming out of the gate with the first song and don’t quit. It’s some competent hardcore stuff with a vocalist that, when he’s not screaming himself bloody, sounds like he’s belting out forgotten tunes from a Hello, Bastards-era recording session. Actually, when I’m doing something else and not really focusing on Down Here With Us, not actively listening to it, the whole thing really starts to take on the definite flavor and punch of a Lifetime record. When the focus returns, I start to note differences between the two—Take My Chances are melodic, yeah, but the melody’s buried. They’re more focused on getting in there, playing the song and getting the fuck out. So I guess I’d say it sounds a lot like Lifetime filtered through a standard hardcore colander, with a touch of thrash thrown in the mix. The layout for this thing’s absolutely gorgeous (though I’ve got a sinking feeling it’s not being offered on vinyl) and there’s a few hidden tracks that consist of Misfits and Black Flag covers. Definitely a decent outing. –keith (One Day Savior)


T.S.R.:
As One Voice: CD
These young kids play a variation on the Anti-Flag / A-F Records sound. If they keep it up...they might eventually sign to A-F: who knows. Speaking of the A-F Connection...This band’s acronym stands for The Socially Retarded, right? Well, when Intro5pect, who is signed to A-F, switched bassists, the old bassist wanted to start a project with me called T.R.B.: The Retarded Buttholes. Hahaha!!! That’s just too uncanny!! –mrz (Mental)


SUPER BLACK MARKET:
Will Sell Anything: CD
This one was hard to pin down at first—I mean, I was into it from first listen but couldn’t quite define why I dug it; there’s a slickness and complexity to it that would immediately turn a lot of purists off. Super Black Market’s drawing heavily from bands like Refused (in the moments where they go from stop on a dime hardcore shit, with strained, blood-gargling vocals, to quiet, verging-on-pretty musical interludes and actual, like, singing) and Jets Vs. Sharks (they’re writing songs that are managing to come across catchy as all get out, mercilessly catchy, but also filled with totally fucked time signatures and weird, discordant parts, without sounding like they’re reading the Cliff Notes to the Discordant Emo Band Handbook) and totally coming up with their own definitive sound. There’s such a danger in music like this, especially in the vocals, that are clear and discernable almost all of the time, of sounding a tad bit too radio-friendly. Will Sell Anything avoids that ugly pitfall with the fact that, despite its inherent toe-tapability, there’s something that’s just a touch creepy and dark about it, possibly in spite of the band’s intentions. Nearly every song has one or more of those moments where you just go, “Shit, that part rips”, and there’s an earnestness to the vocals, genuineness, that bands rarely seem to pull off. And they’re tackling some heavy stuff lyrically, with a certain amount of grace and guardedness, without coming across like you’re reading a text collage-poem or some kid’s acid-addled journal entry. Overall, it’s a complex and innately modern sounding punk record, one that thankfully comes just a touch short of being too slick and polished for its own good. Instead, it winds up being a record with the occasional honest-to-shit guitar solo that I can not only stand, but actually really, really like. –keith (Minnow)


SUNNYBOYS:
This Is Real: Singles/Live/Rare: 2 x CD
The longer I live, the more certain i am that anything recorded in the ‘80s that was really worth listening to i had heard by around 1995. BEST SONG: “To The Bone” BEST SONG TITLE: “Tomorrow Will Be Fine” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Sounds a bit like an overly scrubbed up, early ‘80s version of that French band, The Dogs, possibly the Chains. Also, their first album was originally released on yellow vinyl. Just like the Dickies. Goodness! –norb (Feel Presents)


SUGARFIST:
Media Date Rape: CDEP
The guitarist loves metal. The bassist and the horns love swing and ska. The male singers love Sublime, and the female singer loves No Doubt. Pure speculation on my part, of course. They all hate Bush and the American Media Fuck Fest. More than just speculation. They get a brownie for effort, but don’t quite float this man’s boat. If I’m in the mood for some politics on the backdrop of horns and quick tempos, I’d much rather go listen to Xray Spex or Streetlight Manifesto. Hands down. –mrz (Sling Slang)


SUBHUMANS:
New Dark Age Parade: CD
Before all you anglophiles and hippie-punks get all hot ’n’ bothered, this isn’t the latest from Dick, Trotsky and the boys, but rather the new release by the legendary, recently reformed Canadian Subhumans, a late ‘70s/early ‘80s punk group that hailed from the same town as fellow-legends DOA, and even shared at least a couple of members with that group. Three-fourths of the original lineup—Wimpy Roy, Mike Graham and Gerry Useless (the latter once a punk rock poster boy as one of the “Vancouver 5,” who were convicted for a number of activist-oriented bombings in the ‘80s)—make the scene here, cranking out fourteen tracks of politically astute punk rock that wantonly skewers all the relevant topics of the day: macho shitheads, American foreign policy, religion, the cult of celebrity, class disparity, capitalism and public’s acquiescence of all of it. The tempos may have slowed a bit, there isn’t an immediate anthem like “Fuck You,” “Big Picture” or “Slave to My Dick” and there’s a bit of “rock” around the edges of a couple of songs, but on the whole this stands up quite nicely against their previous albums No Wishes, No Prayers and Incorrect Thoughts, and at worst is consistently above-average, which is more than DOA has been able to say in at least twenty years (mind you, I say this as a huge DOA fan who remains optimistic that Joey will soon find enough inspiration in the current global dysfunction to write and record a full album’s worth of visceral, mind-bogglingly good music that’ll reinvigorate my faith and whop me upside the head for ever doubting him). As someone who loved this band way back when, it’s not only nice to see them out and about again, it’s fuggin’ faboo to have ‘em making a racket that actually adds to, rather than detracts from, their lofty status as one of the greatest North American punk bands ever to grace a stage. –jimmy (Alternative Tentacles)


SUBB:
The Motions: CD
Between the ages of sixteen and eighteen, a day didn’t go by that I didn’t listen to ska of some wave or another. My record collection ran the gamut of it’s thirty-plus year history. This was also the brief time when I enjoyed dancing and actually had a ferocious skank. And I don’t mean some monkey mosh dance done by punk kids. I fancied myself an extra in the movie Dance Craze or something. At any rate, during the mid-‘90s there was actually some really good new ska being made. The Moon Records logo was a guaranteed seal of quality. At some point things started to rapidly decline. Moon started signing any and every band who remotely played anything resembling ska. Most of those bands were made up of people my age and a little older playing ska-punk at speeds my chubby little legs couldn’t dance to and everything started to sound as derivative as people had been saying it was the whole time. Jesus is this my autobiography or a review? I guess the point is, I realize now that bands like Subb and the ones who turned me off to new ska are what happens when the copier is running out of toner and you make a copy of a copy of a copy and the copy you just made has no connection to the roots of the music. Because I love bringing this up, I’ll also say it’s like those hoodie/flannel combos that were in Mervyns in the early ‘90s because “grunge” was popular. It looks basically like the original but it’s a complete misunderstanding of the original intent and aesthetic. The only upshot here is the political leanings that from time to time break up the trite songs about girls and “dancing ‘til the break of day.” –Steveo (Stomp)


STRIKE ANYWHERE:
Dead FM: CD
Wow! Has it really been three years since they released Exit English? Time really flies. I was thinking a year and a half tops. The brain is becoming jello faster than I thought it would. So I really like Exit English and the previous release Change is a Sound. I listen to them often. I also got a copy of To Live in Discontent. I didn’t get into it right away, and it got filed away. But this new release is a bit different. They still have the energy I cherished before, but the songs have an added melody and softness to them. It’s more about the song than trying to knock the wind out of you with the first note. Many of the songs are poppy and melodic with less emphasis on having to sound hardcore—like a lot of built up angst has been lifted. The lyrics are still in the same vein. So, what is different? I looked at the previous releases to see if they had recorded in a new studio. That was not the case. So I chalk this one up to maturity and growth. The songs don’t instantly jump at your face as in the past with the exception of the song “Iron Trees.” They come along at a controlled pace and carry you at a pace that is not frenetic. The guitars are more layered and it seems like a lot of writing and re-writing had gone on in preparation for this recording session. They are also less distorted than usual. The power comes more from the drums and bass guitar. Solid and warm. Thomas still remains to be the most phonetic singer out there today. Singing, yelling or screaming, I can understand what is being said without the assistance of a lyric sheet. It didn’t grab me on the first listen as they have in the past, but it is one of those releases that need multiple listens to really appreciate it. I appreciate it. –don (Fat)


STRIKE ANYWHERE:
Dead FM: CD
There’s a deep poetics, undeniable humanity, and romance-distilled rebellion that rages through Strike Anywhere like a river breaking its banks. At the heart of the matter aren’t empty words (fuck me, fuck you, fuck the world, fuck pigs), but compassion, frustration, and personal fight. The music itself follows suit—meticulous aural oaths—that are played with such twining force to the vocals that you can almost imagine buildings rattling and politicians flinching when the record’s cranked. The fuel that sets them apart? Thomas pulls in his own heritage—family (his grandfather was a welder in the Manhattan Project), hometown (Richmond, VA), history (slave docks and Civil War)—and makes grand statements that are tempered in the highly personal. And not to speak ill of Anti-Flag, but unlike them, Strike Anywhere doesn’t target their songs to thirteen-year-olds and aren’t smart guys dumbing the politics down to the lowest common denominator. (I couldn’t help wince when watching Anti-Flag and, during the crowd participation part of the set, applauded that raising a fist during their song was “unity.”) On the contrary, Strike Anywhere has taken the upside-down banner of the disenfranchised, the stark courage to not merely repeat previous records, sing smartly about it, and—I’m having a hard time saying this for a punk band—wrap it all up with an amazing ballad. –todd (Fat)


STRESSFACE:
Oh…You’re Welcome: CD
Yeah, there’s totally a lot of hype around this band, and you can thank Stressface for that. But the fundamental problem with blaming them for all that hype is the fact that this album is actually really fucking good. I guess if you’ve been in enough bands and released enough albums you gain a substantial amount of knowledge for what sounds good and what people want to listen to. So put this mag down and cut the sleeves off your t-shirt, buy this album, and prepare yourself for some heavy duty backing vocals. Oh yeah, and wouldn’t an Armalite/Stressface split be cool? –Daryl Gussin (Plan-It-X)


STRESSFACE:
Oh, You’re Welcome: CD
This is a project band comprised of almost the entire staff of No Idea Records, which is funny because the CD isn’t on No Idea. Judging from the lyrics, you’d think running a record label is nothing but dealing with UPS. I mean, I’m sure they deal with UPS a lot, but damn, how about some songs about something else? Where are the songs about paying royalties to bands? Sending promo posters out on the road for tours? Stuffing records in plastic sleeves? I know these dudes do more than joke around with the UPS guy. Musically, it’s pretty decent hardcore; they really play up the sleeveless shirt and bullet belt thing, but they actually sound a bit tamer than most other bands that imagery brings to mind. Still, this is a fun album well worth the listen. –ben (Plan-It-X)


STREETSIDE PROPHETS:
Talking to Walls: CD
These high school kids have got to stop being influenced by emo sooner or later. –mrz (Formula Thirteen)


STRANGULATED BEATOFFS:
Jacking off with Jacko b/w Beat It: 7”
Ah, borderline weird masturbation jokes: so many people insist on trying them, yet so few can pull them off. Then again, I’m not sure if this is a joke, or just what it is. Overall, there’s not much info, just some weird artwork, no real liner notes, and just two tracks that leave this reminding me of some weird noise band from a far corner of the Alternative Tentacles catalog (like Pachinko or Ultra Bidé). I’m not completely won over just yet, but I will admit to being intrigued. –joe (Apop)


STRAIGHT TO HELL:
‘02-‘04 Discography: CD
Goddamn, one shudders to imagine the plethora of slayed dragons and razed villages that must’ve fallen prey to this band in their short two-year existence. I’m getting that from the cover, which features an army of soldiers coming out of a large dragon-headed ship, being led by a guy with a He-Manesque breastplate and a dog’s head. It’s really no big shocker that Gloom released this: Straight To Hell’s playing straight-up thrash, with throat-rending vocals and the occasional screeching metal solo thrown in. The bad: I guess I really shouldn’t review thrash shit anymore; all of these bands just start to blend together after awhile. The good: Smart, scene-critical lyrics in a genre that almost always goes for the dumbass A-B-A-B rhyme scheme. –keith (Gloom)


STITCHES, THE:
8 X 12: CD
I feel like I run into a lot of Stitches records in the $5 sale bins of record stores. Fast, catchy stuff with kind of dumb lyrics, beer bottles breaking, and songs that are under two minutes. So, you know, fun. The Pogues song “This Womans Got Me Drinking” is probably the highlight. –bree (Vinyl Dog)


STEINWAYS, THE:
Missed the Boat: CD
East coast pop-punk group who befriends the likes of the Ergs and the Unloveables (in fact one of the songs has a bridge that is a nod and a wink to the Unloveables’ “Feelin all Emo Since I Broke Up With You” song. Only the lyrics here go: Feelin all emo since I ran out of weed! Hahahahaha....uhm, okay, maybe you had to be there). Think Wiggle-era Screeching Weasel. Oh they also have a super duper cute gal on bass and a Middle Eastern lookin’ gent on guitar. –mrz (Cold Feet)


STATE RUN:
Paralysis: 7”
All too often in punkland (or at least the dark and sordid world of punk reviews), words like “gritty” and “raw” are just synonyms for “Man, this recording sounds like shit.” State Run actually makes that grittiness work for them—the dirty recording serves them perfectly. Jagged, bright guitar riffs serve as the launching pad, drums that sound like someone’s pissed off and punching through cardboard keep everything tethered to the ground, and the result is something that’s wholly tense and nerve-wracking. And I mean that as a compliment. It’s like a mixture of Yage or some other long-lost ‘90s Ebullition band and groups like Science Of Yabra’s heavy, weird, wall-like riffs that carry the whole song along. I admire bands that don’t go for the easy plays, the obvious chord progressions or song structures. Bands that delve a little bit deeper and come up with something, like State Run has, that’s serrated and mean and smart, that keeps the listener stuck in this place that’s somewhere between wanting to tap your foot and wanting to just geek out to its anxiousness and this sense of creeping apprehension. So, yeah, Paralysis is gritty and raw as all get out, utilizing the terms “edgy” and “nervous” to the fullest. A fine record. –keith (Rat Patrol)


SONNY VINCENT:
P.I.N.S.: 2 x CD
If this album was a Ramone, it would be Daniel Rey. BEST SONG: “Bad Attitude” BEST SONG TITLE: “Drug Binge” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: 3-D cover art (including boobies!) by the late Mad Marc Rude! –norb (NDN)


SOCCER TEAM:
“Volunteered” Civility & Professionalism: CD
A current Dischord employee teamed up with a former Dischord employee to record some tunes on four- and eight-track machines. The feeling is that of a four-track demo for a band who is still finding itself. It’s slightly amusing but quite often veers off into artsy yawn land. –mrz (Dischord)


SOBRIETY STARTS TOMORROW:
In the Key of Whiskey: CD-R
They’ve aptly written the review for me. In “This Song Is Definitely Not About Vampires,” they have the lyric, “my songs are poor excuses for all the music I adore.” Against Me! is a pretty safe guess for one of the bands they adore. Although SST is a lot faster, there’s a definite resemblance to their statemates there (This is also recorded by Rob McGregor, who has recorded AM!). There’s nothing bad about this in and of itself, but it leaves me wondering what they’ll be like once they develop their own sound that isn’t derivative of those who they admire. I’ll look for it. –megan (self-released)


SNITCHES GET STITCHES:
Even a Butchered Carcass Can Shine: CD
Angry, angular metal with lots of speed, precision and complicated time changes. The first couple songs remind me of Poland’s Antigama, brutal, fast, and thrashing about. Things slow down a bit for “Mom and Me at the Zoo,” but it’s no less punishing than the faster numbers. Sounds like Helmet and Satan might be influences. I’m only halfway through the disc and already I’m exhausted. Aspiring serial killers, you’ve found your soundtrack. –benke (Empty)


SNEAKY PINKS:
I Can’t Wait: 7” EP

…these guys sent me their first 45 a while ago, and, while i distinctly remember that it had a picture of Little Richard on the sleeve and came wrapped in tinfoil, i could not, after significant toil, account for the whereabouts of the item when questioned. Following a live performance that was, by my recollection, both vaguely amusing and mercifully brief (about ten minutes of a nude guy shoving a White Flag reject lookin’ dude if memory holds), i wound up with a copy of the second 45, under strict orders from a formerly nude gentleman not to lose it without listening to it as with the first one. I can say with some assurance that i was not expecting much from the record. I was in ERROR! In ERROR I SAY!!! The a-side, “I Can’t Wait,” is a THING of SHEEREST GENIUS!!! A low-fi—hell, no-fi—ode to underage ugly-bumpin’ that reminds the listener what the fuck the big deal was about those Radio X/Super

Teem era Brentwoods/Donnas/Bobbyteens 45s, anyway, melding that whole mid-‘90s SuperCatchy Darin Ravioli aesthetic with that “sensitive but horny” Buddy Holly via the Ramones crunch of M.O.T.O. “Everybody says that you’re too young/Everybody says that I’m too dumb/Come on little girl let’s have some fun/Oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah!” Well RIGHT THE FUCK ON, formerly naked dude! “Eighteen years is a long long time” indeed! B-side is three more bursts of jeenyus, including the immortal couplet “I wanna blowjob/I wanna hot dog.” Strange as this may sound, this might be the best 7” 45 with one song on the A-side and three songs on the B-side since “Nervous Breakdown,” unless i forgot about something. Oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah oh yeah! BEST SONG: “I Can’t Wait” BEST SONG TITLE: “Life Stupid I Stupid” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: The plain pink labels are not actually plain pink paper; they are a tint screen of magenta on white stock. Also, i still don’t know the name of that Goner Records font. –norb (Rubber Vomit)


SNACK TRUCK:
Terrier Demo: 7”
If Rah Bras made love to The Locust the ensuing noises would sound like this Richmond, VA band. The music will most likely be an unbelievably fun carnival ride for some and ungodly noise for others. –mrz (Drash, no address)


SLEEPERS, THE:
Push It Nationwide: CD
It says “Produced by Jim Diamond and The Sleepers” on the back of the jewel case, which I’m sure the band was hoping would attract fans of Mr. Diamond’s work with the White Stripes and Ponys. The production is great, very clean sounding, but no amount of studio producing would make these generic rock songs into hits, underground or mainstream. I’m sure these guys have fun playing, and they probably sleep with lots of sorority chicks after their shows, but this kind of music doesn’t really belong in the pages of this mag. –benke (www.rocksaucerecords.com)


SLAVE ZERO:
The Pain Remits: CD
As always, big ups to any band that puts out their own CD. Slave Zero plays good old fashioned pissed off metal. Like Pantera. There’s some tech metal parts and some blastbeats, but for the most part this sounds like Pantera, and I mean that in a good way. These guys play exactly what the fuck they want to play and they don’t give a flying shit if you like it or not. That alone deserves my respect. Fucking horrible album cover though. –ben (www.slavezero.net)


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