Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

LOSIN STREAKS, TH’:
Sounds of Violence: CD
Note apostrophe placement. Another fuzzed-out four piece in button downs, ties and sunglasses. Like the Makers and the Fells, but from Sacramento. Very Bellingham, very Estrus, very done. –thiringer (Th’ Losin Streaks)


LORDS:
The House That Lords Built: CD
Roaring out of the gates with nine songs which wouldn’t sound out of place on a Black Cross record, Lords play a similar sort of muscular, punishing, brutal, blistering, chaotic, guitar-driven rock which usually verges on hardcore. The tenth track on this disc is about ten minutes of tape manipulation and silence. While it’s enjoyable enough, it’s fairly short, even counting the semi-hidden track. Of course, I’m not sure that extending these songs would make them any better—perhaps it’s the case that their brevity enhances their power; frankly, hearing any one of these songs reach the three-minute mark would probably make them far less immediate, musically engaging, and interesting. –scott (Initial)


LOCOMOTIONS, THE:
Teacher: 7"
I’m already a big fan of their full-length and of Martin Savage’s previous band the Blacks (from Sweden) so I felt pretty safe grabbing this new 7”. No disappointment, straight ahead rock and roll with eager lyrics that make me think of kids in the ‘50s and ‘60s jumping up and down on the bed with the turntable on. –mike (Big Neck)


LOCAL DIVISION:
Pure Electric Light: CDEP
They sound like some loud English alterna rock band, with a “Bowie records with the Psychedelic Furs for Creation Records” kinda new wavy feel, but the band’s contact address is in L.A. Strange. Guess the only thing that matters is that they do what they do well, even if the Limey accent may be an affectation. –jimmy (Intravenous)


LITTLE BRAZIL:
You and Me: CD
Yes, i’d like a Mega-Whiny™ value meal, a side order of fried Whinies™, a large Diet Whiny™ to drink, and one Hot Apple Whiny™ for dessert. And it better be whiny™, you... you MAN, you! (munch, smack) Oh yeah! That’s gooooood whiny™. BEST SONG: I like “You and Me” because it sounds the most like Bobby Sherman. BEST SONG TITLE: “The Way You Listen” is not necessarily a good song title, but it is a good concept. FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: The outer packaging depicts two ownerless ping pong paddles in a presumably pitched ping pong match, but the diameter of the two holes punched in the UPC code is exactly that of the ping pong ball in use—which, taking into account the white disc tray showing thru the holes, makes it appear as though there are three different ping pong balls in the field of play! Surely this match cannot be sanctioned by any reputable governing body! –norb (Mt. Fuji)


LIDS, THE:
Too Late: 7"
Got this based on Contaminated Records’ good review, which never seems to fail. Tinny treble, but with girls in the band it all comes together. Although they are cute and dress nice, this is not a case of a label signing a band based on a photo. The Lids’ tear it up Rip Off style, short and fast and very-nicely-catchy, with three songs I feel good walking around the house humming. –mike (www.dieslaughterhausrecords.com)


LET’S GROW:
Neverending Story: 7" EP
These guys are plenty pissed off, and they play really fast ‘n’ mean to let you know it. If this had been released in, say 1985, old L.A. DJ Adam Bomb would’ve been giving it massive airplay on his “Final Countdown” show, sandwiched in between Septic Death and Beyond Possession. –jimmy (Know)


LEFTOVER CRACK:
Rock the 40 oz.: CD
I wonder if the kids in Operation Ivy ever cuss themselves out over their direct influence on the inundation of sub-par skacore that has come in their wake. If not, they really should. –jimmy (www.bankshotrecords.com)


LEFTOVER CRACK:
Rock the 40 oz.: CD
I read on the internet that this band is punk rock. Young people all over the nation are proclaiming this band as true punk rock, this band being the shite! Fucking punk rock, dude! So here I am, getting ready to hear what is the godhead of all punk bands. Now let’s hear the opinion of an old fart who has clothes older than some who made these proclamations. First off, the title of this release already makes this seem moronic without even opening it. Inside the cover is an illustration boldly stating Got Crack? Okay, we get the humor. This is going to be in the mold of Guttermouth or NOFX. Hey! I see that these recordings are from back in ‘da day, 1999. Let’s pop this puppy in and what comes out. Melodicore! Hallelujah! Ska parts! I’m weak in the knees and ready to lose it in my shorts! Boy, were those kids right! Actually, I wish this was picked up by Jimmy Alvarado for review. –don (Bankshot)


LEE MARVIN COMPUTER ARM:
Self-Titled: CD
Arty spazz rock a la the Piranhas, or maybe even the Cows if they were suffering from meth psychosis or something. The perfect soundtrack for the always-fun next morning hangover or hitting yourself square in the forehead with a brick. –jimmy (Conspirators In Sound)


LEAVING TRAINS:
Amplified Pillows: CD
Three different lineups present, in all their sloppy glory, twenty-two tracks from two different live shows and a live session from KXLU, circa 1987-2002. I was gonna wax poetic and extol the virtues of the Leaving Trains ‘n’ shit, but fuck it. Suffice it to say that if you dig ‘em this’ll more than satisfy, and if you don’t, well then maybe the new Whitney Houston album will be more your speed. –jimmy (Steel Cage)


LATIN DOGS:
Warning: 7" EP
A bootleg of an EP from a ‘80s Michigan hardcore band made famous by their inclusion on a couple of now-famous bootleg punk comps, apparently done up all nice and purty like it came out way back when, right down to the lyric sheet. Sounding like a cross between American Wino-era Lewd and the Zero Boys, these guys definitely had it goin’ on. Dunno how many of ‘em are out there, but I suggest you collector whores start looking. –jimmy (Kazaaamo, no address)


LATEST, THE:
Self-Titled: LP
Definitely wasn’t expecting this. Actually, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I know it wasn’t country music. To be honest, it’s not bad country music, but it’s not straightforward Hank Williams-style country, either. It reminds me of the slower, weirder parts of bands like Masters of the Obvious (especially in the lyrics), Guided by Voices (vocally sometimes), and the Kent 3 (mostly just the guitars), and I get the feeling that these guys have listened to quite a bit of the Country Teasers as well. This record’s growing on me, except for the third song on the second side (I don’t know the names of the songs because the artwork, although really cool, is confusing), which I instantly liked. And how do you not like a record label called Peer Pressure Zombie? A recommended curveball. –Josh (Peer Pressure Zombie)


LAST TARGET:
What Caused the Problem?: 7"
In 2000, TKO released an album by Thug Murder, three Japanese girls who could play streetpunk better than just about every blue-collar British pub crawler who tried their hand at the genre. I saw Thug Murder open up for the Swingin’ Utters and Dropkick Murphys in 2001, and they were great. All energy. Punk as fuck. Then, they seemed to disappear. I have no idea what happened to them, but Ryoko, Thug Murder’s singer, is obviously singing on this Last Target record. It’s not as catchy as that Thug Murder album, but these two songs are everything you want in a streetpunk album. It’s good stuff. –sean (TKO)


LADYKILLERS:
Welcome to Rock’n’Roll Kid: CD
Where do these bands come up with these god damn stupid band names, anyway? What, was “Heartbreakers” taken or something? Oh... uh... never mind. I guess it was. Twice. But, then again, so what? Who’s counting? Surely we could dock no points for lack of originality from a band who boldly bestowed their CD cover with a ground-breaking color scheme of red and black (genius!)—a band who paints their name in white on the backs of black leather jackets (brilliant!)—a band that endorses sideburns (shocking!)—and even cigarettes (author!)! No sir, the Ladykillers blaze trails, and the rest of you crippled munchkins have no choice but to follow! But, further, exactly what happens to the short “a” and long “e” sounds when bands like these habitually substitute other, presumably more rockin’ vowel sounds for them, like the long “a”? I mean, when they sing about “drankan’“ and “heart atake muhshaynes,” what happens to the “ih” and the “ee” and the “ah” things? Are they recycled? Broken down for parts? Sold on eBay™? Distributed to needy families in their community? Rock’n’roll is a very perplexing cosmos indeed! However, if we can get past the Lady Killing and the Heart Breaking and the Drankan’ and all like that, this band trots the middle ground between the rock’n’rolly pop-punk of the Teen Idols (what! no! imagine!), and the not-so-poppy punky rock’n’roll of the Heartdrops, breaking a few ladies and killing a few hearts along the way, especially with their uptempo raveups like “Krystin” and “Two Faced Man.” Things also descend into dopey neo-Dropkick sing-a-longs like “Drinking (excuse me, i meant “Drankan’”) with the Boys,” which is the exact kind of song written by and for people attempting to persuade themselves into believing they’re not as stone bored with drankan’ with each other as they undoubtedly are, and also the type of song i’ve been known to feed jukeboxes dollar upon dollar, selecting the longest possible songs available to me, to block the playing of. Taken as a whole, though, not a bad effort: Anyone to whom sideburns, cigarettes and black leather jackets act as a genital stimulant will not be disappointed in this purchase; those who might be a bit more wary as to the band’s potential for cliché transcendment are advised to seek succor elsewhere. BEST SONG: “Krystin” BEST SONG TITLE: “She Pours It Well” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: I thought of the Heartbreakers quip before i realized they actually covered “Won’t Back Down” here. –norb (No. 3)


KRUMBUMS:
Cut into Me: 7" EP
Austin hardcore—now there’s a phrase I haven’t said in at least two decades and one I never expected to utter again. While they ain’t the Big Boys or Dicks, this progeny of that scene of yore do it justice here by not sucking. –jimmy (Slab-O-Wax)


KREAMY ‘LECTRIC SANTA:
Great Plans Laid to Rest: 7"
Drug-riddled lo-fi psyche punk culled from a fourteen-year span (1990-2004). When it’s slower, less focused, and includes sound collages, it’s reminiscent of Bongwater and Smegma, which can be annoying and interesting in quick turns. Faster tracks have the unexpectedly lit fireworks in your back pocket, ass-on-fire feel of early Butthole Surfers. Picture a map as a drop cloth. Eat too much of an international buffet at a questionable casino; puke it all up. What happens? Different types of chunks, splattered all over the map. Starts with blips, ends with an acoustic song. –todd (Shut Up, $5 ppd.)


KODIAKS:
Cherry Blossom, Evil and Alcohol: 7" EP
Primitive, lo-fi grunt punk produced by Tim Kerr. Dunno if it’s the copy I picked up or not, but the mastering is awful. –jimmy (www.supersecretrecords.com)


KNOW MASSIVE:
Mood Swing Set: CD
With their mellow, trip-hop vibe, they’re a tad reminiscent of Portishead (who they sample on at least one song), and the MC flowing across the top has a smooth delivery that compliments the backing track nicely. While this doesn’t immediately set the barn a-burnin’, I know it’s gonna grow on me pretty darn quick. –jimmy (www.moodswingrecords.com)


KNOCKOUT PILLS, THE:
1 + 1 = Ate: CD
For a long time we Tucson folk were making the KO Pills live up to earlier local superstar bands they are former members of. The Pills must be tired of that, so they made an amazing album to make us forget the oldies. Catchy, jumpy, rad songs you can pogo to or cry in your bedroom over. Lots of snot dripping on the song writing, lots of melody in the rawkness, this is not a young band trying to figure it out but four guys with a lot of music under their belts. The teacher made an album the students can love. –mike (Estrus)


JUVENTUD CRASA:
Después de Tanto Tiempo: CD
So far as I can glean, these kids are from Puerto Rico and they belt out some mean punk/hardcore not unlike Argentina’s Dos Minutos, meaning there’s some pop hooks buried underneath all the yelling. Lyrics are in Spanish, but translations are provided for those not hip to that language. This puppy’s gonna get played lots. –jimmy (Southkore)


JUNIUS:
Forcing out the Silence: CDEP
This could have easily been passed up and neglected. Self-described as having influences of the Cure, Placebo, and A Perfect Circle, this EP definitely has all those elements. Take the darkness of the Cure’s best and mix it with the heaviness of A Perfect Circle and moodiness of Placebo. That’s the creation this band has morphed itself into. The songs are intriguing without me losing attention. I feel like I’m swimming in a mind-altering drug hallucination. Their use of feedback is dreamy yet powerful, and it adds emotion. Might not fascinate the masses but this fell into my lap at the right time. –don (Radar)


JESU:
Self-Titled: CD
An individual named Justin Broadrick used to play guitar for Napalm Death and Godflesh. He quit those bands and creates music on his own. Produced here are eight songs, none of which clock in at under six minutes. Reminds me a lot of Godflesh but in a slower, more monotonous manner. This CD feels like committing suicide by using a pushpin. It’s going to take a very long time. –don (Hydra Head)


JE NE SAIS QUOI, THE:
Secret Language: CDEP
Electroclash music with a fair bit of punk energy (think International Noise Conspiracy with lower production values) that doesn’t really go anywhere interesting. If you really need to hear this, go buy the first DFA comp and listen to the Rapture’s contribution—you’ll hear everything on this disc and how it could be done better. –scott (Coalition)


HOT WATER MUSIC:
The New What Next: CD
I once thought that the review I penned of Down By Law’s last album was the toughest I would ever have to write; I tried to recuse myself from the start on that one due to my personal association with the guys in the band but that one flew about as well as a dead seagull. Now this. When I revived my zine after a hiatus of several years, Hot Water Music was the first band that I interviewed. They were one of the bands that made me realize that something existed beyond shitty, third-generation Bad Religion and NOFX ripoffs that wasn’t Crass or Bay Area pop punk. It was raw, complex, heartfelt, sincere—it just flat out fucking killed me. It took me a while to get it—I had to spend some time with Fuel for the Hate Game and Forever and Counting. I had to open my ears a little more, expand my idea of what music might and could be. I can’t even count how many times I’ve listened to them now, how many times I’ve played those songs on the radio in the middle of the night. When A Flight and a Crash rolled around and polarized HWM’s fan base, I got that album too. Even though I could understand why people were pissed about that record, I couldn’t agree with them because I still heard the things in it that made me fall in love with the band—it wasn’t a replica of an earlier album; instead, they pulled off at a rest area, gave some directions about how to get to the next stop on the musical journey and took off without looking back to see who followed. Then Caution dropped and, once again, plugged into a void in my life. I can’t even count how many times I’ve listened to “Trusty Chords” now, but I had it on repeat for something on the order of five weeks. And now it’s past one a.m. and I can’t tell if I simply don’t have any more voids left to fill or if this album is as much of a letdown as I fear it is. Maybe it’s that I’ve matured past the music… but I don’t think that’s true because I fucking hate Michelle Branch and think the Shikari disc in my player is one of the most awesome things I’ve heard this year. Maybe it’s the circumstances I’m in right now—for once, I’m relatively settled. I’m employed, in a good relationship… things are going pretty well for me, so maybe it’s the comparative lack of conflict and struggle… except that can’t be it either because I’m gearing up for a four-year fight and HWM’s old albums are the perfect soundtrack for it. What I’m increasingly left with is that this album isn’t so much of a stylistic advance or musical experimentation as it is a puzzling detour into relatively flat, uninteresting territory—sort of like driving across the Midwest with nothing more than a thermos of coffee and a tape that is only sort of okay to keep you company. Sure, on the surface it seems superficially similar. There are still two guitars, the rhythm section is still one of the best ones in punk, but something is missing. The songs seem slower, more moderately paced; they seem more conventional and restrained. Whereas older albums frequently sounded like the band was pushing to break through some unseen and unperceived barrier that only they could recognize, this album sounds like they took a breather, almost as if these songs were written from a template that the band developed years ago or an equation that returned tracks from the values they entered. Hell, even Scott Sinclair’s artwork looks radically different for this record. Sure, there are some great moments—”Ink and Lead” is as good a love song as they’ve ever written, “Giver” closes out the album in a classic Hot Water Music stop-and-go breakdown mode, and “The End of the Line” is yet another moment of solace for fans who are lonely, feeling out of control, or who need to open up and experience something new… or maybe all of the above. The problem is that these redemptive moments, the handful of soaring, swelling, transcendent guitar lines which make the world seem better, if only for a moment, are dramatically fewer in number this time; while everything that initially drew me to Hot Water Music is still present, it’s muted, subdued and in limited quantities. But hey, we all grow up, right? We all get older. I’ve come to the realization over the years that my affection for and appreciation of some bands will last forever; other bands are more like passengers on the same plane or bus or train—maybe we exchange a few friendly words while we wait to leave, we travel together for a while and maybe realize that other people feel similarly or even the same as we do right now and we feel better for a while. However, no trip lasts forever. Sooner or later, someone has to change direction and while that may mean that we part ways—perhaps only temporarily—it doesn’t mean that we can’t remember and celebrate the good time we had together. –scott (Epitaph)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937 938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 947 948 949 950 951 952 953 954 955 956 957 958 959 960 961 962 963 964 965 966 967 968 969 970 971 972 973 974

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player


·ONWARD PILGRIM
·CBGB: Decades of Graffiti
·GALLOWS
·JE NE SAIS QUOI, THE
·TYRADES, THE
·DUDES MAGAZINE #17
·REVEREND BEAT MAN & THE CHURCH OF HERPES
·3RD GENERATION NATION
·MANU CHAO


If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2015 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.