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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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KNUGEN FALLER:
Lugna Favoriter: LP
Perhaps it’s from liking and listening to a lot of Otis Redding, but Knugen Faller, who could easily be placed in the “throwback ghetto” and dismissed as solely “a Swedish band who likes X-Ray Spex, Josie Cotton, and the Go-Go’s,” have a ton of soul. Sung entirely in Swedish, it gave me more time to just enjoy the structure of the songs. Aside from the more obvious punk and new wave sign posts, it kinda gets me how similar they are in spirit to many of the early Stax artists: chops galore, but tastefully played. All the instruments are used together to paint a more expansive picture, all rotating time in emphasis. So, in the punk rock lineage, as much as Silvia Sate’s great, strident voice, Knugen Faller take the jump-punk-rock-stride of The Saints and Rocket From The Crypt (man, I’m a sucker for well-placed, ska-less horns), and continue to add to the baffling good line of bands coming out of small city of Umea. Score another for the Ny Vag collective. Highly recommended. –todd (Wasted Sounds)


KILL YOUR IDOLS:
Something Started Here: CD
Here is a compilation CD that collects a bunch, if not all, of Kill Your Idols’ loose tracks from comps, splits, and EPs. This is almost overkill to try to listen to all at once. From what I understand, this is also available as a box set of vinyl 7”s, and I would have to say, you might want to go that path with this release if you have the means, so you get everything in nice little chunks. Personally, I can’t since I don’t have a record player (Gasp! Punk rock blasphemy). Kill Your Idols plays straight-ahead ‘80s-influenced hardcore punk that shifts between fast and really fast (with the occasional breakdown), with some very pissed-off, shouted vocals to top everything off. This is the kind of punk rock that all sounds the same the first several times going through it, but after a couple spins you start to realize that it infiltrates your consciousness as you begin to recognize and catch onto different songs. My personal favorite songs are “I Told You So,” where the band manages to achieve some sort of huge epicness that makes the song sound monumental, and the cover of Scandal’s new wave masterpiece “Goodbye to You.” What I really love about the Scandal cover is that if you’ve ever heard the original, you know that Kill Your Idols’ vocalist Andy West is about the last person who should ever attempt to sing the Patty Smyth parts from the song, but the band still manages to pull the song off nicely. I also have to say that the booklet that comes with the CD makes a good case about why physical releases are so much better than just downloading albums. The notes in the booklet are extensive and feel like a mini biography. This compilation might be too much to tackle in one sitting but it’s a good way to get better acquainted with Kill Your Idols, whether you’re a super fan or looking for a good starting point. –Adrian (Lifeline)


KILLER DREAMER:
Self-titled: 12”
Killer Dreamer have been squonking out their brand of SoCal punk for years now, yet they never get the credit or attention they deserve. This new record might finally get them that attention. Thirteen tracks of raw, classic hardcore just like the Circle Jerks or Black Flag woulda played it way back in the day. These guys hail from San Pedro, the town that gave the world the Minutemen and Toys That Kill, to name a couple. In that respect, Killer Dreamer has some pretty big shoes to fill, and do a spectacular job of it. Excellent artwork, too: crazy silkscreens and spraypaint and hand-stapled labels. It’s a beautiful little testament to DIY. Get this record! –ben (Small Pool)


KAKKA-HÄTÄ 77:
Totaalinen Kakkahätä: CD
I almost refuse to use this term when it comes to reviewing bands, mainly because it’s almost meaningless but also because it’s used so poorly sometimes, but I think it’s a pretty dead on statement to make that Finland’s Kakka-hätä 77 is KBD material, and I may be one more asshole using that in a review, but whatever. This CD contains the music from the two 7”s this band has released. Angelic Upstarts and early Clash played much pubbier, with lots of hooky backing vocals and a healthy helping of punky goodness. The artwork on the front is a black and white illustration of a gutter punk cross country skiing through a moonlit forest and the back is even funnier. I read on the internet that this CD debuted at #15 on the Finnish charts and the label is totally baffled that people like it so much. Fucking cool. –Daryl Gussin (Combat Rock)


JUDDER AND THE JACK RABBITS:
All In: CD
There was a time in my life when I thought psychobilly was cool. Then I actually heard it. P.S. Corpse paint is stupid. –Bryan Static (Cherry Red)


JENNIFERS, THE:
Colors from the Future: CD
On the Jennifers’ previous EP, John Irvine sang, “That which doesn’t kill me/Can still hurt a lot.” It’s a simple twist on a familiar line and it represents what The Jennifers do so well: tweak what you’ve heard before. Swirled among the band’s kaleidoscope of sounds are glimpses of presumed influences—Television, the Soft Boys, XTC, and R.E.M., among others. Over the years, the labels for the Jennifers’ type of music have changed like a James Bond license plate—punk, new wave, indie pop—but the essence remains constant and simple: it’s smart guitar pop. Not since the Young Fresh Fellows’ Electric Bird Digest have I listened to a record so many times in one year. I turn to Colors from the Future like most people turn to syndicated sitcoms. It’s a fantastic mental pipe cleaner of a record, a disc that clears away the work day. Musically, that is. As was the case with Electric Bird Digest, I’ve barely scratched the surface with the lyrics on Colors. That’s likely to take another year or three and I didn’t want to wait that long before passing along my two cents on this brilliant record. (Note: The Jennifers do not count in their ranks anyone by that name. There are, however, one John, two Joes, and a Skizz.) –Mike Faloon (Beef Platter, www.thejennifers.com)


JAPANTHER:
Scuffed up My Huffy: CD
Not only was Japanther a band to be reckoned with from the first time they played a show or even when they set out on their first tour way back when, but now with the release of this new full-length, they are untouchable. This album is better than anything they’ve put out thus far. You better believe it. This time they’ve struck more than just a nerve… they’ve struck them all and bruised them good. The samples and intermissions are better than ever, the newfound melodies kick the shit out of anything that ever came out of the ‘80s new wave scene, and damn me to hell if “$100 Cover” isn’t the best song of 2007. Highly, highly recommended. –mrz (Menlo Park)


IRON CROSS:
Two Piece and a Biscuit:: CD
Here comes the first new recording by Iron Cross in twenty years. I think that they are pretty much the first band from the U.S. to do the whole oi thing. As far as old bands getting back together is concerned, I have much more admiration for those who actually get together to write some new tunes rather than just tour and rehash their glory days. That said, I think this is really bad. Mid tempo oi songs are the order of the day. That’s all fine and good, I mean we’re not building fusion bombs here. The problem lies in singer Sab Grey’s delivery. So bland, so emotionless. I swear that Stephen Hawkings could get more emotion out of these tunes than ol’ Sab and his monotone. Throw in a piss poor cover of Cocksparrer and call it a comeback. No wait! There’s more. The second part of the record is by a new group called Sab Grey And The Royal Americans. Here’s where the gold lies on this disc. Seriously? Skinhead country music? The song “Skinhead Girl” is worth the price of admission alone! This disc went from bad to beautifully ridiculous! –ty (Teenage Heart)


INSTANT ASSHOLE:
D.U.I. Or Die: 7”
Brand new follow-up to their debut CD Straight Edge Failure. Confrontational, I-don’t-give-a-shit punk rock that reminds me of many bands from the early ‘80s. I mean, I can hear bands like the Dead Kennedys, Fang, MDC, and even hints of Stukas Over Bedrock in their songs. I can hear the growth on this release compared to their first release. I feel the length of time together has made the band more cohesive, yet the bile of the lyrics is still there. Once again, the main topic brought up is alcohol. I love to drink, many of you like to drink, and it’s totally obvious that they love to drink. The songs feel tighter even though they play a loose style of mid tempo to fast punk. Songs that are like a slap in your face and played with angry conviction. If you’re a record nerd like me, you’ll dig the cool white with black splatter version that the label sent. –don (Tankcrimes)


INSTANT ASSHOLE:
D.U.I. Or Die: 7"
Sloppy, fast, drink, drink, puke, drink, fuck, fart, drink some more, punk about driving drunk and being driven to drink. Wish I had the lyrical prowess to address my drinking problem in every single song like these dudes. Seriously, that’s quite an achievement. But, it would be even more monumental if the songs weren’t typical Punk Rock 101: felt like I’ve heard them all done better by other bands in some capacity, and the vocalist emulating Jello Biafra just makes me want to drink, drink, puke, drink, fuck, fart, and drink some more. –Dave Disorder (Tankcrimes)


IDLE KIDS:
The Factory Lines: CDEP
Sweat on the floor. Shirts off. Cracked plastic cups full of shit beer. Squeals of feedback in between songs. Vocal cords scraped raw. Yeah, I’m a total sucker for bands like Idle Kids. Taking the same blueprint (i.e.: generally mid-tempo, gravel down the gullet, soaring and weaving guitars, a propensity for gut-wringing anthems) as bands like Madison Bloodbath and Wrister (and before them: Organic, Altaira, Leatherface, Hot Water Music, etc.), these guys have crafted an absolute bummer of an album. And I say bummer because this thing is so goddamn good and so goddamn over after a grand total of five songs. What the shit, guys? It’s a rare band that puts out a record with every song right at or above the four-minute mark and still manages to keep my interest throughout. Maybe it works out for the better—there’s no chance on getting the listener getting burnt out on every song starting to blend in with the next. At five songs, I’m still left wanting more. When the fifth song comes to a close, it’s still a little bittersweet and all that shit. So, to close: Idle Kids haven’t reinvented the wheel with The Factory Lines, but they have crafted some lovely-as-shit, far-reaching, and honest rock music. Awesome. –keith (Idle Kids)


HUNCHBACK:
Inside/Out b/w Song for Dave Berg: 7”
Some lighter output from a (normally) much noisier band. Two songs, one of which is from their upcoming LP, the other is exclusive. Topics covered include Courtney Love, and buds, and there’s a very jangly, mid/late ‘90s alternative rock vibe to it (as opposed to most of their ‘80s underground/Killed By Death output). This record costs a dollar. Pick it up. –joe (Don Giovanni)


HITCH:
We Are Electric!: CD
Belgium trio sprinkles in a little Kerosene 454 with a splash of Bluetip. The angular, disjointed riffage is there. But this band, after ten years of slogging it out on both sides of the Atlantic, bring their own pizzazz to the proceedings. “Radiation Winter Part II” has a really cool vibe. Looking to hear more from this band in the future. –koepenick (Moonlee)


HIGH TENSION WIRES:
Midnight Cashiers: CD
Reminds me of a combination of New Mexico’s Shang-A-Lang and TTK’s Sean Cole songs. This hasn’t sunk its teeth in deep yet, but a few more listens and it just might. –mrz (Dirtnap)


HIDDEN SPOTS:
Important Transmissions: 7”EP
Yeah, I know, making DIY punk music’s hard and its benefits sometime get fuckin’ lost in being scraped down to nubs, but it’s bands like the Hidden Spots that reveal one of its secret weapons: strong-ass regionalism (not necessarily by geography). You see, there are these eddies of groups of bands around the world that continually morph and continue to rule, like The Riverboat Gamblers/High Tension Wires/ Marked Men/ Potential Johns brain trust and Sexy/ Chickenhead/ ADD/C/ Future Virgins/ Horrible Odds/ Hidden Spots think tank. I don’t want to say “geographically,” because folks move, but stay in contact, and the music strain’s in ‘em, regardless of what type of dirt’s underneath their feet. These family trees retain that nice, solid, oaky essence through all the bands, but each one is as distinct as the veins in a leaf. Enough of the tree hugging. The Hidden Spots take that unshakable earnestness of The Jack Palance Band (and the same voice: Mike Pack)—catchy, but not too sweet, with little flourishes that reveal themselves after repeated listens—along with the rumble of Leatherface to churn out four songs that light a new spark. –todd (ADD)


HEY GIRL:
Spill Your Guts!!: LP
In the earlier part of this decade, the Bay Area was blessed with a group of guys who played in various bands like Los Rabbis, Tommy Lasorda, and Poser Posse. They made some amazingly crazy punk rock and I feel privileged to have seen them the few times I did, and have the recordings I have of them. I actually only have one recording and it’s the Los Rabbis CD that was on S.P.A.M. Records. That CD features a song called “Hey Girl,” which I can only assume influenced this band’s name. Hey Girl remind me of Los Rabbis’ poppier moments, and “Hey Girl” was, without a doubt, their poppiest: same multi-vocaled, lo-fi, distorted, slop punk with just enough feedback to give it effect but not make it annoying. Bad ass. –Daryl Gussin (Thrillhouse)


HELL, THE:
Self-titled: CD
Fast and furious Zeke / Speedealer style mayhem. This shit is pretty excellently fast and rocking, like Turbonegro smoking a chopped-up Dwarves album out of a light bulb. Another win for Carbondale! –ben (Let’s Pretend)


GREATEST HITS:
For a Good Time Call: CD
I am such a sucker for this style. It has to be pretty lame glampunk for me to not like it and this disc is pure ear candy. They take from the full spectrum: moody Hanoi and Lords stuff, poppier stuff, and Thunders worship. Songs are a little on the long side and this is best taken in a few smaller doses than in one sitting. Fans of Hollywood Teasze, Trash Brats, Rick Blaze And The Ballbusters, and Kevin K will find a lot to like here. –frame (Desert Island)


GOVERNMENT WARNING:
Arrested: 7”EP
I just finished watching a fun bicycle movie, Breaking Away, from 1979. It was sorta unnerving that a film shot on location in Bloomington, IN close to thirty years ago had a lot of the same fashions that are being picked up in hipster circles in the U.S. now. (Dude, I don’t want to know your religion from across the room. Loosen those shorts a bit.) The Necros released their first self-titled 7” a couple years after 1979, and it’s a bleak, broken, jagged, and fast testament to the crumbling of America’s foundations. It sounds like music made by the people at the bottom who constantly get crushed. That made me think this: hipster irony (in fashion and music) is dispossessed, disposable (they’ll be onto something “new” soon), and future-less and past-less, where as these pure strains of hardcore that keep recurring—the type that Government Warning is in the skin of—doesn’t make me feel like I’m hopping into the throwback machine because they’ve inherited the initial spirit, reclaimed the ghost, and are bearing the weight now. Shit’s fucked up-eder more than ever, and here’s the soundtrack. –todd (Grave Mistake)


GLEAM GARDEN:
In the One-Sided World: 7”
Oh cool, a one-sided seven inch. That’s kinda neat, but why did they bother to press grooves with no sound onto the blank side? That’s weird. Gleam garden play classic Snuffy Smile-style punk. It’s overproduced, a la Minority Blues Band; it’s fast and melodic like the Urchin; and it’s got the trademark heavy Leatherface influence in the lyrics. A few years ago, everyone would go out of their way trying to describe a lot of the Snuffy Smile bands without comparing them to each other, but nowadays the “Snuffy Smile sound” is just as easily recognizable as any other punk label that’s developed their own style (Fat Wreck, Dischord, and Lookout, to name a few) and that’s something that Gleam Garden should be proud of. This is a weird, good little record. –ben (Snuffy Smiles)


GHADDAR / PANACEJA:
Split: 7”
Ghaddar: mid-tempo powerviolence from Pennsylvania. Songs about such things as lazy DIY promoters, killing pigs, and how mislead religious people are. Pretty formulaic, but you know, curry is a formula too, and that shit’s delicious. Panaceja: super-intense, raging powerviolence from Croatia. If they had more room than half a 7”, I bet they would have been able to lay down some really ripping shit. You know that They Live 12” on 625? Something that good, I bet, but without the rapping. –Daryl Gussin (Feral Kid)


GATOS SALVAJES, LOS:
Complete Recordings: CD
Los Gatos were one of the big names in Argentina’s rock scene of the late-’60s/early-’70s. Their single “La Balsa/Ayer Nomás” was a huge hit in their home country and brought the band great success in the ensuing years. Before all of that, however, they were Los Gatos Salvajes, a small but potent band heavily influenced by Britain’s Merseybeat sound and not-so-small fans of the Beatles. In this first incarnation’s short career, they managed a few singles and a full-length, all of which, while not over the top like U.S. bands like the Wailers and the Sonics, are competent additions to the genre and show the seeds of what was to come later. This is the first international CD release of Los Gatos Salvajes’ repertoire, featuring their full-length, singles and B-sides, live tracks and some home recordings of lead singer Litto doing a little composing, and no doubt a welcome one, seeing as they’ve become something of a cult band amongst Beat fans. In all, this is some good stuff for those sympathetic to the genre. –jimmy (No Fun)


FRIENDS OF THE RED ARMY FACTION:
Fuck Yr Violence: Cassette
Aesthetically, this thing is totally crappy—sloppy, hand-written lyrics and muffled-as-shit sound quality make it a fairly hard listen. But I gotta admit, there’s a charm here that can’t be denied: it sounds like it was recorded at a practice (at one point, you can actually hear the band trying to figure out the parts of the song before they start playing), the lyrics are short but politically spot-on, and there’s just such a lovely air of “this is a blast, dude, who gives a fuck if you like it?” It’s like a shot of B-12 in the ass after slogging through all these one-sheets and promo glossies. Actually reminds me a lot of Riot Cop if they were super sloppy and recorded their stuff on a Fisher Price boombox. Yeah, I’ll admit it; I had a good time with this one. –keith (Sharpie Fumes)


FOUR EYES, THE:
Five Songs (About Video Games and One about Something Else): CD
Video games, ugh. MMORPG’s, double ugh. And, while i recognize the Four Eyes as the American Institution that they are, Geek-Squad-ifying the Dead Milkmen and/or Kung Fu Monkeying Weezer is not the type of activity that spurs me to rip tunage to my Xbox 360 overmuch. Comes with an entire live album as a bonus track, which actually puts the value of MMORPG-based love songs in perspective when weighed against the slings and arrows of predictably ironic faux-arena rock. I continue to attempt to keep this record’s existence hidden from World of Warcraft players, simply to deny them pleasure. Schaudenfreude kicks ass! BEST SONG: “Group With You” BEST SONG TITLE: “Balrog Bop” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: I have had the dubious pleasure of creating not one but two Neverwinter Nights ((see track 6)) mods in my life; one involved a city full of nothing but prostitutes and plague victims, the other was a loose interpretation of “West Side Story,” with orcs and mummies, but i put too many giant beetles in the level and i would always get killed before i could go talk to the orc girl and win her heart. –norb (Thrillhouse)


FOR SCIENCE:
Way Out of Control: CD
Its Alive’s first CD release comes as a surprise because it isn’t your conventional pop punk fanfare. While poppy melodies and harmonies are commonplace, this band is hardly describable by that phrase: pop punk. Vocals are Bent Outta Shape-y and the music reminds me of the Zoinks. All the songs are catchy and delivered with a passion that is hardly matched by any other band these days. The only song that I could have done without is the slow, folksy “Just Pray.” No worries, though. That leaves seven other gems to keep me company. –mrz (It’s Alive)


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·VENKMAN
·Featured Record Reviews From Issue #83
·TIMEBOMBS
·MUTANT GENES
·DISTRACTION, THE
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·WICCANS
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