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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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HOWARDIAN:
Land of the Low Tides: Cassette
Howardian is the solo project of Japanther’s other half, Ian Vanek, out of Olympia, WA. Super fuzzed-out guitar and a drum machine. It’s gritty and dirty garage rock. One of the lines in the first track is: “You can’t fuck with a child of reggae.” I really don’t know what that means but I’m not willing to find out. Sound clips are littered throughout the album to break up the tracks. The last track is a collage of looped sound clips over some lo-fi drumming that I’m really not into. “Chunking” on Side A has real pretty guitar work that reminds me of early Cure. However, that song and “Marble Meshes” right before it, are both instrumental. Whereas the first one feels like it drags on way too long, the closing track more than makes up for the monotony of “Marble Meshes.” The record is a great effort, full of experimental weirdness that bands like Japanther are aces at, but I’m personally not sold on it yet. Might take a few more listens before it grows on me. If you’re into bizzaro, synthy art rock, this is your jam. But while I was once really into Don’t Trust Anyone Over 30,that adage applies to me now, so I guess you’re on your own here.  –Kayla Greet (Bufu, bufurecords.com)


HUNG UPS, THE:
Love Sick: CD
This is solid offering of stripped-down, no-frills punk rock and it gets my stamp of approval for that. Musically, The Hung Ups remind me of a slower-tempo Teenage Bottlerocket sewn together with ‘90s EastBay stuff. Songs about punk rock and punk rock girls and sociopaths—can’t go wrong with that, usually. Good harmonies, too, but sometimes they get a bit lost in the mix. I guess I must really like this record, because I don’t have that much too say, which is a good thing in my world. The Hung Ups have been worth my time, to be sure.  –The Lord Kveldulfr (Pizza Girl)


HUNNY:
“(Leave Me Alone or) Suck It” b/w “Felix Tone”: 7”
Pretty bitchin’ couple of tracks from these L.A. locals. Any record that forces me to re-examine what speed I have my turntable set to is already good in my book. In addition to that, I was certain it was warped as well. Looking closely, the record itself was not warped, only the music on it. Extra points for swirly, poop-brown vinyl.  –Garrett Barnwell (Laptop Smashing Party, laptopsmashingparty.bigcartel.com)


INSTIGATORS:
Nobody Listens Anymore: LP
The English band Instigators came to my attention in a huge way when the crucial Cleanse the Bacteria compilation came out in 1985. It was like a new world of smack-you-upside-the-head brand of super catchy politico punk. Once I was finally able to get the LP a year or two later, I played it to death (no really, my copy is beat to hell from over play). This thirtieth-anniversary Ruin Nation re-release contains the original LP as well as the Blood Is on Your Hands EP. Closely connected to the Subhumans (both bands records were on Bluurg) with a somewhat similar sound, albeit less quirky and more straight-ahead powerful U.K. punk. Lyrically, these guys had an extremely heavy anti-vivisection angle, which dates the lyrics somewhat, but make it an excellent representation of what was going on in the anarcho punk scene thirty years ago. I hadn’t played this record in probably fifteen years and I’m stoked how well it holds the test of time.  –Mark Twistworthy (Ruin Nation, ruinnation.org)


INSTIGATORS:
The Blood Is on Your Hands: LP
The Instigators appear to have had the unfortunate luck of being a punk band during the ‘80s in England when their peers inadvertently cast quite the shadow over them. Periodically, they’re on the same musical map as Subhumans, Flux of Pink Indians, Conflict, and other politically minded/aware punk bands. This record collects their The Blood Is on Your Hands 7”, as well as some compilation tracks and demo recordings, which appear to have the sharpest teeth in the lot. Sadly, the Instigators were never cut out to enjoy the same success and accolades as the above mentioned bands due to only moderately impressive songwriting. A fun listen, but nothing to trade your Crass records over.  –Juan Espinosa (Ruin Nation, ruinnation.org / Skuld Releases, skuldreleases.de)


INSULTS, THE:
Stiff Love: 7” EP
Is there room in your world for the second-best ode to fellatio of the Killed By Death era? Is there room in your mouth? VILE TEENAGE MOSQUITOES ON A CUM-FUELED RAMPAGE!!! I guess this is what people mean when they say “it is what it is.” It totally is! BEST SONG AND SONG TITLE: “Stiff Love.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: LP of unreleased Insults coming! Alert Jackie Mason!  –norb (Last Laugh, lastlaughrecords.us)


JACKALS:
Violence Is…: EP
The market town of NorwichEngland has never been the hotbed of hardcore (Deviated Instinct excepted), but Jackals are trying to put that town on the map. Remorseless hardcore bringing to mind the glory years of U.K. hardcore (that’s the early ‘90s if you didn’t already know), when bands like Suffer, Urko, and Health Hazard ruled that mean little island. For the new kids on the block, think Integrity mixed with some of the new wave of British hardcore like the Flex or Arms Race. If that means nothing, then think in-your-face political hardcore with dual vocals that hit like a brick to the mouth. Boss.  –Tim Brooks (Hardware, hardware-records.com)


JAIL SEX:
Self-titled: CD-R
Pounding, no-frills hardcore akin to bands like Out Cold—virulence set to an ooom-PAH-ooom-PAH-ooom-PAH beat. They wisely keep things short, sweet, and simple—yet know when to change up and keep things from getting too repetitive—and put some muscle behind a singer who likely needed a mouthful of throat lozenges four seconds into the first tune. No overstaying their welcome here, you get six tunes in nine minutes and you’re left wanting more. That’s how it’s done, kids.  –jimmy (Jail Sex, facebook.com/jailsexatx)


JAMES REESE & THE PROGRESSIONS:
Let’s Go (It’s Summertime): 7”
Here’s an odd find—a rare funk record from 1969 turns up in the review pile at Razorcake HQ. At least, so it appears to be. There’s a chance I acquired this 45 previously and forgot about it; but otherwise, all signs point to someone sending a copy of this rarity in for review. It’s never been reissued or bootlegged. Not in this format, anyway. Quite fascinating. Well, I have to say, I’m not overwhelmingly educated in this genre… so commenting on the quality of the music is a little subjective for me. Although, I can confirm it’s an extremely pleasant listen. Solid, horn-driven, instrumental funk. Not to mention, from its original era to boot. Judging from the research I’ve done, sounds like it’s comparable to scale of a KBD punk record, if OG funk and jazz is your sort of thing.  –Steve Adamyk (Najma)


JASON BANCROFT AND THE WEALTHY BEGGARS:
The New American Folk: CDEP
After listening to The New American Folk, I have a strong urge to go train hopping and catch fish with my bare hands. It’s one of those folky punk albums that’s rife with social commentary and DIY ethic empowerment. What Bancroft’s voice lacks in range is made up with gruff sincerity. If you like Chuck Ragan at all, you’ll like this.  –Nicole Madden (Self-released)


JOHN WESLEY COLEMAN:
“I Feel Like a Sad Clown” b/w “I Found a Home”: 7” and”Radio” b/w “Aliens”: 7”
I don’t know how close these two records were released, but I got them at the same time, so they flow together in my mind, and probably always will. The moods of John Wesley Coleman are many, and on these records he seems to feel a bit out there. “I Feel like a Sad Clown” is probably closest to his fleshed-out, full-band Goner records, and excites me most because of the lines about “clown shoes.” Ten years or so ago, some friends and I used the phrase “clown shoes” to describe anything super silly or ridiculous. I thought one of us came up with the phrase, then I overheard a complete stranger use it, in a different state even! So, Mr. Coleman, whatchoo talkin’ bout? The Spacecase 7” (their second JWC release) is dayglo orange, and has a more solo, home-fi feel, although it is recorded with a full band. “Aliens” gives me Roky Erickson vibes. If you like JWC, you probably already own this. Or maybe you gave up because he’s über-prolific and you’re overwhelmed. Don’t miss out on this, I says.  –Sal Lucci (Spacecase, spacecaserecords.com / Windian)


JONES, THE:
Gravity Blues: LP/CD
This is the remastered version of an album first released in 2000. Most notable for including personnel from Leatherface and HDQ, the original had some belting songs and excellent guitar work. However, I always felt that it came across as somewhat lifeless, resulting in it languishing away in a corner of my collection. Thankfully, that is not the case here as the ten tracks have been given a new lease on life through a much more clear and energetic production, which is really pleasing to hear. The other bonus is that it doesn’t sound dated in any way with the songs standing the test of time. The CD boasts additional tracks from Fatty Jones and Stokoe, both bands sharing key members with The Jones to round off an excellent reissue.  –Rich Cocksedge (Boss Tuneage, bosstuneage.com)


KAPPA CHOW:
“Jump” b/w “Something Better to Do”: 7”
Wow! This one’s a gem. The closest thing I can compare New Brunswick’s Kappa Chow to is Black Angels, if they were less pretentious, had a sense of humor, and liked having a good time. The first track, “Jump,” has a woman lifting lyrics from David Lee Roth. Yeah, you know the ones: “go ahead and jump.” “You’re always telling me what to do / thinking I would do anything for you / I’ll tell you that just ain’t true,” she says, demanding that this figurative David Lee Roth “(take) a few steps back.” These words are sung, not shouted—and sung beautifully—setting a firm boundary with an unquestionable confidence over a melodic, psychedelic groove with clanging yet shimmering guitar riffs and a lilting, high-toned sax that I’m still not convinced isn’t a flute. The flipside has male vocals in the forefront with the rest of the band backing him up. It’s not a deep song—a lamentation over being stood up for Chinese food at seven—but it rocks in the same vein as Side A. The songs work well together to create an atmosphere and a vibe, but are distinct and memorable on their own. Still into the psych-garage revival? Fucking sick to death of the psych-garage revival? Doesn’t matter. Everybody wins with this. Some of these kids are doing their own thing.  –Craven Rock (Kiss The Void, jchamandy@hotmail.com)


KYLE KINANE / THE SLOW DEATH:
Split: 7”
Rad Girlfriend Records is right: this may be the “Weirdest 7” ever.” The A side features punk rock comedian Kyle Kinane doing seven minutes on rescuing a skunk with its head stuck in a mayonnaise jar. With his trademark gravelly rumble, he deconstructs his own ridiculousness, while endearing himself to those with a soft spot for adorable “aminals” in distress. Recorded in Omaha, NE, the track also features a live audience who cannot contain their glee at Kinane’s Grizzly Man wannabe misadventures. The B side plays much quicker, as Minneapolis punks The Slow Death fly through delightfully messy, harmonica-soaked covers of (Young) Pioneers’ “We Ain’t Even Married” and “Fuck the Labor Pool” without pausing for a breath in between. The package is rounded out by Mitch Clem and Joe Dunn’s simple, iconic artwork, making this piss-colored split a truly marvelous oddity.  –Kelley O’Death (Rad Girlfriend, radgirlfriendrecords@gmail.com, radgirlfriendrecords.com / Silver Sprocket, mailorder@silversprocket.net, silversprocket.net)


LOAD:
Drunken Warrior Chief: LP
1991. My eleventh grade. The grooves of this full length collection are chock-full to the brim with Vision Street Wear, Armory shows, underage drinking, and circle pits. The metallic k.o. of Florida’s humidity coupled with bored rage. When you’re from Miami, the only way to go (geographically) is up, right? I remember Load toured, what seemed, quite heavily through the South, and while Florida does not actually count as a southern state, this LP carries a dank punk/crossover weight, coupled with southern cable TV-wrestling humor. The LP is a loving memorial to Load’s singer Bobby (who passed in 2012), culling tracks from EPs, compilations, and two unreleased songs on heavy black vinyl. Crucial release for memory lane and fantastic snapshot or starting point for the interested.  –Matt Seward (Rat Town, rattownrecords.com)


LONELY REVOLTS, THE:
Broken Bones Burning Hearts: CD
A quote from the back of the CD insert: “We are the Lonely Revolts. We do not come to you in the name of religion or in the name of some church or with judgment & condemnation. We come in the name of Jesus Christ with blood, sweat, tears & love.” A quote from the label’s Bandcamp page: “Thumper Punk Records helps artists record, produce, and distribute music that reflects a positive, Christ-centered message. Jesus Christ Hard Core (JCHC) is spoken here. Fight like a man, scriptures in hand!” Consider yourself warned.  –jimmy (Thumper Punk, thumperpunkrecords.com)


LOOKOUT MTN DAREDEVILS:
5 Song EP: CDEP
This EP is an utterly fantastic debut from a supergroup made up of members of popular southern punk bands, most notably Hellstomper and The Stovebolts. Slick production highlights the punchy, catchy, and melodic down-home tracks, with crystal clear, heavily annunciated vocals. There are four originals, as well as a cover of “The Bomber” by The James Gang. Fans of dirty southern punk will get a kick out of this release, but those into any garage-influenced sounds will appreciate it as well. I’m looking forward to a full-length. Lookout for Lookout Mtn Daredevils!  –Art Ettinger (Self-released, lookout.mtn.daredevils@gmail.com)


LOST TRIBE:
Solace: LP
Bring on the post-punk, bring on the death rock, bring on the goth rock. These guys remind me of some of the bands killing in the Northwest right now, like Bellicose Minds, The Estranged, Spectres, Arctic Flowers, and Countdown To Armageddon. The songs have a good drive to them, with moody bass lines and tight mid-tempo post-punk drums. I like how tough these songs sound but not in a macho way, in a rock’n’roll sort of way. The layering is nice, with some saxophones added in there. They don’t overdo it with the keyboards, so the songs breathe nicely. Fans of a lot of the older bands like Killing Joke, Christian Death, and Sisters of Mercy will easily fall in love with this record. I’m always happy to hear new bands making really great dark music like this. Nice work, Lost Tribe. Nice work, Mass Media!  –Ryan Nichols (Mass Media, cameron@massmediadistro.com)


LOUDER:
Self-titled: LP
A ten count of Japanese snot-punk, smartly filtered through both a) a garage, and b) 1977. Solid work and excellent packaging. A little too nuanced to be hurtling into pure garage territory, but the ferocity’s there. I don’t know enough about Sorry State to know if they’re stepping outside of their wheelhouse with this one, but Louder could’ve fit in just as well on No Front Teeth or Deadbeat, if that helps. Personally, I’m reminded greatly of the Stitches 8 x 12”,which isn’t a bad thing at all.  –keith (Sorry State)


LOW BOW / DINGED UP:
Split: 7”
Mixed bands meet mixed emotions for me on this release. Low Bow’s powerful start enthralls me, speaks to me, and even thrills me. Single Mothers meets Les Savy Fav (circa Let’s Be Friends), this record starts to grow on me, grow to be a part of me, embracing every second to come. I am captured, held hostage in Low Bow’s Side A. After a few listens, I free myself from Side A and venture to Side B, Dinged Up. Significantly slower than Low Bow’s side, Side B seems deeper, more meaningful, full of power, but it’s all a goddamn illusion. Song 1, “Big Red,” captivates me, then leaves me disappointed with the follow up, “Made of Grief.” As much as I loved, and even embraced the previous three tracks, I cannot see this getting much rotation on my record player. I wish I could throw Side B song two in the garbage forever, and live in a perfect world where this record includes everything but that.  –Genevieve Armstrong (Genjing, genjingrecords.com / Wallride, wallriderecords.com, ridethewalls@gmail.com)


LOW CULTURE / IRON CHIC:
Split: 7” EP
I am sure that I don’t need to describe what either of these bands sounds like since you’re reading Razorcake and I would say that both outfits are decidedly “Razorcake-y.” I also probably don’t have to tell you how good this is, but I will anyway since it’s kind of my job in this situation. Guess what? It’s fucking great! Iron Chic are soaring high and Low Culture hit the ground running in this full frontal assault. I can’t not smile while listening to this.  –ty (Dirt Cult)


LOW CULTURE / IRON CHIC:
Split: 7” EP
Iron Chic: In a wholly different dimension where music, not product, is pushed at listeners, I can totally hear “Subhumanoid Meltdown” garnering lots of radio attention. Nice bit of mid-tempo poppy punk with noodly guitars and anthemic choruses. Their other tune here, “L’esprit de L’escalier,” is the more traditionally “pop punk” of the two, vacillating between mid-tempo catchiness and bursts of thrash beats. Not usually my bag o’ worms, but they definitely aim for the higher echelons of the genre. Low Culture: Two prime poppy ditties built on a garage chassis. Their connections to the Marked Men monolith are well known to those who care about such things, but here they sound less like an offshoot and more their own entity, with less hammering and more nuancing of the hooks. Good split.  –jimmy (Dirt Cult / Dead Broke)


LOW CULTURE / IRON CHIC:
Split: 7” EP
This split is like when your best friend becomes your lover. Sometimes you get really lucky and don’t have to choose one or the other, you get both. In 2013, these bands released two of my favorite records of the year—Screens and The Constant One, respectively. So, getting new tracks from these two on the same release is like magic. Two tracks appear from each group, but in a format I’ve never seen before: each side has one from each band. What I took for creative, and mold-breaking, is more of a logical decision, as Iron Chic’s songs are at least twice as long as Low Culture’s. At first, it’s a little jarring to have a quick switch between the two. Iron Chic bursts through the speakers with a fast-paced melodic ballad, and, after a few minutes of punk rock lullaby, Low Culture breaks that relaxing calm with bright guitar work that really shines through. Once you get to Side B, this formula is more familiar, and the closing songs are a lot stronger. “Subhumanoid Meltdown” is so classically Iron Chic with their signature roller-coaster cadence, insightfully poetic lyrics, gritty bass, and drums flailing. Low Culture finishes it out with a singalong track about wanting to drink beer and listen to records with a friend, rather than be alone. This is a split I can totally get behind.  –Kayla Greet (Dirt Cult, dirtcultrecords.com / Dead Broke, deadbrokerecords.com)


MAKO1972:
Cannonball Lecture: 7”
Big hole purple vinyl 45 from this Denver band, who play ‘90s Touch And Go-inspired stuff that I would not like, no matter how well done it is. It is solid and well played Fugazi meets Shellac type of music that fans of those bands would likely love. Never been my thing in any way, but you could certainly do a lot worse than this.  –frame (Snappy Little Numbers)


MASQUERADE:
Blood Is the New Black: 12”LP
Helsinki band Masquerade is an interesting mix of genres. They somehow gel early Banshees, post-punk Arctic Flowers, the dark psychedelic goth of Rakta, and melodic ‘90s alternative a la Jane’s Addiction “Three Days” into a perfect tincture. All quiet, all storm. Heavy bass, dark winding melodies, and Siouxsie vocals have a haunting effect. Trippy ending of choir echoes of drummer boy add to the overall euro darkness.  –Camylle Reynolds (Mass Media)


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