Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

GENTLEMAN JESSE:
Self-titled: CD
There’s a lot to say for records that smolder all the way through. Hip sways. Deep nods, slight sneers, the feeling that you want to snap your fingers, even though you rarely think of such things. Gentleman Jesse isn’t blathering, blistering, or putting the listener’s face up to a belt sander. Nor is the trio powdering up diphenhydramine hydrochloride and blowing clouds of it to the audience. This is no snooze-fest. They take a route that’s much more perilous, where each instrument has to take its turn being load bearing so the songs don’t buckle from being constructed by fluff or effects pedals. And when it’s an instrument’s time to shine; bright tones, crisp lines, decipherable lyrics, and more than just a little bit of dazzle all the way through. It takes me back to bands like Eater and The Saints; bands that didn’t quite fit into the “natural order of things” when they were around, but their audio legacies are undeniable. The impeccable pacing also heavily reminds me of The Exploding Hearts, but in more of a Merseybeat, instead of Elvis Costello-ish, way. I hate hearing this record end. Fantastic. –todd (Douchemaster)


GASLIGHT ANTHEM, THE:
Señor and the Queen: CDEP
Here comes my poorest and undoubtedly least understandable simile for this issue, but I’m standing by it: the Gaslight Anthem sound like what I would imagine a genetic recombination of R.E.M. and the Bouncing Souls to sound like. This is one of those records on which even the music sounds like it’s in a thoughtful and introspective mood. This would be a great record for driving around town while wistful and vaguely dissatisfied with things. Rocks well, but provokes inward musings at the same time. I like it a bit more every time I hear it. –The Lord Kveldulfr (Sabot Productions)


FOREVER NIGHT:
Playing Dead: CD-R
Don’t play dead. Just get it over with and die already. –Dave Disorder (Self-released, playingdead138netscape.net)


FIX MY HEAD:
Self-titled: 7” EP
A nice bit of thrashin’ put down here by these Oakland natives. The A side opens up with two slower, heavy tempoed tunes and from there they let loose with the thrash; not as fast as some, but more than intense enough to make it worth your while. –jimmy (Vinyl Addict)


FEAR OF LIPSTICK:
Self-titled: 7”
Pretty much equal parts ‘90s Lookout and, well, Ramones, Fear of Lipstick’s follow-up to their first 7” on It’s Alive is a slightly different affair in that it forgoes the by-the-numbers pop punk of their debut by incorporating a “darker” feel reminiscent of Disconnected or Last Race-era Stiv Bators. Hardly a mindblow, but a nice progression nonetheless –Dave Williams (Fucking Scam, no address)


FEAR OF LIPSTICK:
Indie Band: CD-R EP
Never had heard of this band, but when they played the first night of Insubordination Fest 2008, I was convinced. Four tunes, all clever, all rocking. I bet these guys drink Molson Golden. An honest brew makes its own friends, and an honest band like Fear Of Lipstick does not disappoint. Looking to hear more from these guys soon.  –koepenick (It’s Alive)


F.P.O.:
You Don’t Know What Human Is: LP
It’s not every day a hardcore band from Macedonia pops up. These guys play some decent Y2K thrash. I think two or three song seven inches would be more effective. As an LP, everything here starts to sound the same, and there’s not a whole lot of “oomph” to keep you interested the whole way through. The vocals have zero character. Just shout, shout, shout, with no real sense of emotion. This record isn’t horrible. It’s just okay. –Matt Average (Third Party, www.thirdxparty.com)


EVERYTHING MUST GO:
Sonic Pornography: CD
I don’t know if everything must go, but one thing that really needs to go is wishy-washy Dead Boys rehash bands. –ty (Calendar Of Death)


ESTRANGED, THE:
“Entranced” b/w “Vilified”: 7"
I know I’m repeating myself, but if The Estranged hadn’t heard of Articles Of Faith prior to recording, I’ll boil my shoes, eat them, and floss with the laces. The A-side track is the fastest and most to-the-point I’ve heard from them, giving the most evidence of their pedigree in previous hardcore bands. The B-side is, by a small degree, more rough and loose than what’s on their excellent debut full-length, Static Thoughts. The Estranged walk a tightrope expertly; they retain their icy structures and foreboding qualities, while locking into a catchy, pocketed grooves. That balance separates them far above the glut of standard, more predictable fare. –todd (DeadIdeas)


ERGS!, THE:
Dorkrockcorkrod: LP
What the fuck do we mean when we say “pop punk” anymore? It’s a term so loosely applied to every “punk” band without a three foot mohawk or girl pants and swooping bangs that it means little to nothing to me anymore. I mean to me “pop punk” is a term and invention of the ‘90s applied to bands like Screeching Weasel, The Queers, MTX, The Lillingtons, Boris The Sprinkler, Green Day, (and it pains me to say) Blink 182, most things on Mutant Pop Records, and retroactively applied to bands like the Descendents. I had to put “most things” before Mutant Pop because Dillinger Four put out a 7” on Mutant Pop and I don’t consider Dillinger Four “pop punk.” I don’t know what fits bands like D4, 99.9 percent of what’s on No Idea, or half a dozen other like-minded labels but I know it isn’t pop punk. What am I driving at here? I guess it’s that the term pop punk has been so diluted that when I say The Ergs! are the first decent pop punk band in probably ten years that my meaning may be unclear. I feel like in the late ‘90s in to the first few years of the oughts that pop punk really took a nose dive. Most of the classic bands of the genre were breaking up or trying to break out of the box that they and their fans put them by playing music that was definitely not what they were known for. And sadly on the grassroots front there was a glut of half-assed bands aping Screeching Weasel or Blink 182 and ultra glossy bubble gum bands. Everything just seemed to be going wrong for the genre and I think, subsequently, a lot of people moved on. Anyway, 2003 rolls around and this little gem comes out. This is The Ergs! first LP and although not a call to pop punk arms in and of itself, it was definitely the rumblings of the old beast starting up again. It’s well played, well written with just the right amount of rough edges, angst, and a surprising lack of cringe-worthy moments. It reminds me a lot of the Descendents but in no way does it leave me feeling like they’re aping them. By no means do I think we’re talking about a modern classic here, but it definitely has its moments. And for a genre that has struggled for so long (in my eyes admittedly) that’s saying an awful lot. Tightest jam: “Pray for Rain.”  –Steveo (Don Giovanni)


END OF ALL:
The Art of Decadence: CD
Definite Wolfpack influence here (an ex-member is in this band). Heavy and mid tempo metallic hardcore with the stamp of Sweden all over it. Amid the darkness and heavy pummeling dealt by the rhythm section there are strong, tuneful currents flowing through the songs. The dual guitars, at times, play off each other, one pushing forward, the other creating a new layer with a melodic angle. The piano on “Sista Vilan” was a great touch, ending the album on a somber note. –Matt Average (Crimes Against Humanity)


ELECTRIC BUNNIES, THE:
Eskimo: 7"
Man, some things just have to be filed under enigma, like this Electric Bunnies seven inch here. I know, I know, gees oh gees, let’s not start on the name. I’m going to focus on the positive and this three piece out of Miami, Florida thrash out two poppy garage-influenced gems that just flat out rock. I’m about to kick myself for being from Florida and not having heard them before. Then, I flip to the B-side and the bottom drops out. There’s this muted-out electro dump-fest that sounds like new age chanting. It just makes me want to toss what seemed like a potentially nice surprise right into my “you’re headed to the used record store” pile. I haven’t heard enough of ‘em to know which band they are, but I’m willing to seek out more releases in order to solve this riddle. If it’s the band on the A-side, hoorah! But if I hear one more song like the one on the B-side, I’m done. 
–Dave Disorder (Florida’s Dying, floridasdying.com)


EDDY CURRENT SUPPRESSION RING:
Primary Colours: CD
I hope I’m not being too obscure here, but this sounds like The Bass Holes merged with Lifter Puller. Sure, there’s a comforting feeling you’re in the hands of musicians who’ve been playing for decades, even if they haven’t—circular, repeated, lyrics (so you can sing along to a song the second time you hear it), and strained almost-spoken, yet confident vocals. But if the listener zones out for just a bit, there are strong, hooky indie elements that cast the more garage elements in a unique light. It’s like holding a bare bulb underneath something; instead of where light traditionally falls, attention is brought to an area usually cast in darkness. It’s this little change of approach that makes this record fuckin’ good. It’s like those paintings where you have to have soft eyes to see the hidden picture (a schooner is a sailboat, stupidhead). I never thought I’d be hearing something akin to taking the wonderful elements of the Gibson Brothers in one ear and Superchunk in the other, and with a soft focus, hearing the two blend into something denatured from both. An outright surprise and a great one at that. (In engines, a suppression ring is a device in the crankcase that prohibits backfiring. The band name fits.) –todd (Goner/Aarght!)


EASTFIELD / DESTRUCTORS 666:
Labor Omnia Vincit: CDEP
All around solid seven-song split from these two U.K. punk bands. Eastfield are up first, playing English ‘77-style punk (however, this Yankee tends to think most British bands with hooks fall into the ‘77 category) with relevant, sharp songwriting. They play two originals and two covers: one of Divine and the other an intense update of The Tom Robinson Band’s “Glad to Be Gay.” The latter easily being the best track on the album, with lyrics updated to be (more) relevant to today, with the corporate co-opting of queer culture. The rest of their songs were short, to the point, and addictive. Destructors 666 have gruff sort of vocals, reminding me of Jimmy Pursey at times. They have a Seeds cover as well as two originals which were, you could say, more party-oriented than Eastfield. Good punk rock that is a nice throwback to old records you know and love, but exciting enough to keep you from turning it off to play those old records. –Craven (Rowdy Farrago)


DUDE JAMS / SHANG-A-LANG / GORDON GANO’S ARMY / DAN PADILLA:
4-way Split: 7"EP
Dude Jams: Wow, an unreleased Toys That Kill song. I kid, I kid, but, fuck, son, it sounds like Todd Congelliere singing—I can almost see him swallow the microphone at the end of the song. I like it, but it wouldn’t hurt Dude Jams too bad to make their own sounds. Shang-A-Lang: Dudes are still bummed and wrapped in existential anguish. The song asks: Life don’t mean shit, so why get out of bed? Answer: to make DIY anthems for the dispossessed. I swear, if there wasn’t a lyric sheet, you’d think they’d be singing about how fun their last bike ride was. Gordon Gano’s Army: Flawless mid-pace, melodic British punk (from Britain, not just sounding like it) that’s got that effortless Smalltown quality to them. Clean, anxious, and on target. Dan Padilla: Yeah, pretty much hoard all you can by these dudes. Lyrically, their song takes a look at the pressures of developing an acute assholeishness in order to curry the favor of one’s father on the football field into a mini-epic of a song. The math’s right. Two-thirds of Tiltwheel, with a Gene spliced in, and they haven’t done an ass song yet. –todd (Fast Crowd / Dirt Cult)


DUCKY BOYZ, THE:
Near Death Experience: 7"
I really thought that I was getting some East Coast street punk stuff here, but nope… This is not the Ducky Boys I’m familiar with. This is… rockabilly! It’s not that I hate rockabilly, far from it. I just hate the rampant douchery that goes along with that particular scene these days. All in all, this record is pretty forgettable. Cool cover art though.  –ty (Blind Bastard)


DOPAMINES, THE:
Self-titled: CD
It’s like a calculus equation. Scratch that. It’s like simple math. (DIY, non-Warped, non-hair product) pure strain pop punk = girls + bubblegum + varying degrees of Ramones +/- Beach Boys. Some recurring variables have popped up in the ‘00s. Sickness, snot, more drugs. (And the Queers/Screeching Weasel abacuses.) At the top of the ledger are the considerable likes of The Copyrights, and on the edges (incorporating more than just a pure strain, which, history shows, will make them more resistant) are Off With Their Heads, Dear Landlord, Banner Pilot, and The Chinese Telephones. The Dopamines know the confining walls of pop punk well, and instead of contentedly stuffing the listener into a small box, tinkering with thread-bare riffs, and clumsily figuring how the male end of one cliché fits slides into the female end, they sound like they’re having the times of their lives, playing to a sweaty basement of wigging-out friends. That energy and the precision how they play make this record a fun, strong listen.  –todd (It's Alive)


DOPAMINES, THE:
Self-titled: CD
I threw this on while sitting on the back porch with my roommate. About thirty seconds into each song, one of us would say, “Wait...this is ripping off (fill in some name or another).” It’s one thing for that to happen once or twice, but it was every song on the entire album, and not just a riff here or a line there, but we were fully singing other songs on top of theirs—cadence, melody, everything fit. I’m not sure if it was a strange homage (especially to Toys That Kill on the second track, “Molly”—there’s no way it could just happen to be that close) or just blatant stealing. And, I do understand that pop punk is a well-traveled path with lots of familiarities between bands the more you listen to it, but there are tons of bands out there throwing in their own twists to make it their own. It’s not that I don’t like this, actually I do, but I just wish it had a bit more (or really, any) of its own voice.  –megan (It's Alive)


DOUBLE NEGATIVE:
Raw Energy EP: 7"
On top of the pristine heavy-weight vinyl and intricate packaging, this 7” contains nothing but full-blown, teeth grinding hardcore punk. Like a lingering hangover, it makes you want to punch yourself in the face, if nothing else but for your own good. In times so contaminated with disgusting human traits, watching this clear vinyl spin around circles to the soundtrack of complete anger is pretty damn close to purity. 
–Daryl Gussin (Sorry State)


DRY HEATHENS, THE:
First Contact with Ground: CD
It’s weird. The first two tracks kind of remind me of something the CEOs of It’s Alive Records would put out in 7” format. Then the album slows way the fuck down, the songs take on the shape of indie rock, and the sing-alongs kind of disappear. So weird. –mrz (Church Key)


DOPAMINES, THE:
Self-titled: CD
Building on the promise of their debut CD-R, this Cincy three piece delivers the bacon on their full length debut. “Fun Tags” and “The $50,000 Cigarette” rock with reckless abandon. I don’t know who Dan Teets is, but he should bow down and kiss the ground that these dudes walk on for writing a song about them. I hope Jon Weiner’s forehead has recovered from Insubordination Fest 2008. Go see ‘em live and ask him.  –koepenick (It's Alive)


DONNER PASS:
Demo '08: CD-R
Postpunk five-songer with a heavy nod to Wire’s instrumental interplay and jagged edges, except for what is apparently their party track, which is the same as their band name and sounds like a raved-up “Louie Louie” with Matt Freeman singing. There’s something to be said for a band that sings, “Once again I see three severed heads” and makes it sound like a pretty good time. Given a brighter recording and a bit more of an aesthetic appeal—I know it’s just a demo but there’s just about no info here whatsoever besides the song titles and a really pixilated cover—I could find myself coming back to these songs more than a few times. 
–keith (Donner Pass)


DOMESTICA:
Mommyhead / Self-titled: 7" / CDEP
Don’t remember much at all about the ‘90s band that preceded Domestica, Mercy Rule, but they sound like they learned quite a bit from their adventures in that decade. The songwriting, loud guitars, and general feel of the tunes recall that brief period in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s when bands were experimenting with what would happen when you mixed this’n’that with punk’s energy. Although probably not stuff the average Joe wanting something to complement his DRI fixation would wanna invest in, their tunes are catchy, well crafted, and leave pleasant memories when “indie rock” wasn’t a bad thing to call a band.  –jimmy (Speed Nebraska, no address)


DIRTY TACTICS:
Self-titled: CDEP
Guitars influenced by more recent fare from the Dischord crowd get cleaned up and lathered with enough pop sensibilities to please any major label interest that might be in the offing.  –jimmy (www.undergroundcities.org)


DIRTY LOOKS:
: 7"
Now-defunct (I think) band who had former members of Bent Outta Shape. Too bad because there’s some pretty good stuff here. Vocals kind of like Lefty Loosie’s Addie (especially on “Theifs”). If they are still around, I want more.  –megan (Iron Pier)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937 938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 947 948 949 950 951 952 953 954 955 956 957 958 959 960 961 962 963 964 965 966 967 968 969 970 971 972 973 974

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player


·CIRIL
·WELCOME TO FLAVOR COUNTRY #12
·ADVENTURES OF TAD MARTIN, THE #6
·THEMA ELEVEN / GRIDE
·CREDENTIALS, THE
·TONE
·PLATINUM BOYS
·SEVEN INCHES TO FREEDOM #11
·ANTIBUBBLES


If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2015 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.