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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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TIMBER:
941-: 7"
Dischord/Rites Of Spring brand hardcore from Maryland. Pretty damn well recorded and well structured songs with enough punch to make it stand out. There’s a lot of the color white in the packaging of this 7” and that usually turns me off, but, then again, there's a lot of white in that Rites Of Spring 7”.  –Daryl Gussin (Something Crucial)


THIS HIDDEN SWITCH:
Trial and Error: CDEP
This first time that I listened to this, all I could think was, “Bands really need to listen to more than one band. I’m so sick of bands being so far up Hot Water Music’s ass that they can touch Chuck Ragan’s molars with their tonsils.” As I listen to THS now, I still can’t get the thought that they are emulating HWM out of my head. They don’t do it poorly, but I think that we’d all rather listen to HWM. Music aside, the artwork is pretty rad. It’s a painting of a chimp using a stick to try to get a banana from behind its cage. I’d really like a poster of it.  –Vincent Battilana (S A, thishiddenswitch.com)


THAT’S MY DAUGHTER:
It Takes Tuna Tango: CD
I like this, but I think I would like it more sans the quasi-pedo artwork. (The cover has a painting of a twelve-year-old topless mermaid wearing sock puppets on her hands. The back cover has two tweens in shirts and underwear wearing sock puppets on their hands engaged in an apathetic high five or one-handed patty cake. At least none of it looks realistic.) TMD have good poppy melodies, a bit of a Sub Pop vs. Lookout! punk feel, and traces of early ‘90s alterna rock with co-ed vocals (though primarily female lead). The catchy sounds and sock puppets are helping me get beyond the seemingly pedo nature of the artwork.  –Vincent Battilana (Self-released, myspace.com/thatsmydaughter)


TESCO VEE’S HATE POLICE:
Gonzo-Hate-Vibe: CD
Long-awaited reissue of this classic out-of-print recording from 1992. Now beefed up with a whopping eleven bonus tracks. This sounds great and how can you go off course with song titles like “Big Giant Cock,” “Fuckin the Dough,” and “Judas Priest My Ass Hurts!” There are also choice covers of songs by Black Market Baby, The Fix, The Obsessed, Pat Smear, and even R.E.M.! You cannot go wrong with this one. Buy this now and crank it at your Halloween party. Don’t forget to dress up like Henry Rollins.  –koepenick (Meat King)


TEENAGE JESUS AND THE JERKS:
Shut Up and Bleed: CD
Another compilation of Teenage Jesus tracks for the masses to ingest. What’s the count, fifteen now? As I’ve stated prior, I can’t say I’m much of a fan of Lydia Lunch the persona—people as blustery and elitist, as she goes out of her way to come off, strike me less as misunderstood geniuses than arrogant quasi-intellectuals trying to project some sorta artsy street cred by incessantly wallowing in life’s fecal matter and pooh-poohing anyone who dares question their motivations—but I’ve always had a soft spot for her musical endeavors, and this stuff remains a personal favorite. As have prior releases, this covers the band’s total output of atonal skronk slam’n’bang: Ms. Lunch’s misanthropic screeching, James Chance’s too-short tenure as saxophonist, brief, noisy instrumentals like “Red Dragnet,” all culled from live sets, EPs, singles, and celebrated comps like No New York. Tacked on are tracks from one of Lunch’s side projects, Beirut Slump, who push farther into no wave’s artier recesses. If you don’t have any of the myriad other Teenage Jesus anthologies and you like your music loud and abrasive, this is more than worth a listen.  –jimmy (www.cherryred.co.uk)


SURRENDER / ACTS OF SEDITION:
Split: 7"
Surrender: When writing about Crass, one has to be careful, due to the length, depth, and diversity of Crass’s catalog. One may only be familiar with “Sheep Farming in the Falklands” or Feeding of the 5,000. And they’ll have a much different understanding of the band than someone who can’t get Yes Sir, I Will off of their turntable. Since members floated in and out, switched roles, and their musical cannon oscillated from classical (Acts of Love) to the downright chaotic (Stations of the Crass), your understanding of Crass might be different than someone standing right next to you with a Crass tattoo or assflap. That all said as a frame of reference, these two Surrender tracks are their Penis Envy: talky, wiry, collaged, and gender politics charged songs. Acts Of Sedition: Are pissed in the doom, melodic landscaping vein of From Ashes Rise. I like it when bands set up the stage: smokestacks, black sky, then gallop into the madness. Very cinematic. The vocalist sounds like a murder of crows smoking unfiltered cigarettes. Not bad.  –todd (Penguin Suit / Surrender)


SUNNYSIDE:
Make Tacos Not Bombs: CDEP Demo
The lead vocalist sounds like he can never catch his breath, and it’s always on the verge of cracking or giving out. That provides a nice bit of anxiety and momentum to these four songs. I’m not quite sure if I believe in resurrection and rebirth, but I do believe in solid songs by solid dudes who’ve been in other bands. (Sunnyside has Ross! formerly of Tiltwheel, Gene of Dan Padilla, Josh Mosh (co-owner of Fast Crowd Records), and a singer dude who wrapped his bandana over a microphone that was shocking him during Awesome Fest II. That didn’t quite work, so a beer coozie was slipped over it. That worked; much in the same way Sunnyside does. Ingenious, DIY, and effective shit. For fans of early Fifteen (without the half-hour talks between songs) who will heckle the living shit out of Jeff Ott (almost to the point of tears) if he plays anything except the early Fifteen stuff in their living room.  –todd (Self-released)


STREET LEGAL:
Selt-titled: CD-R
Five originals and a Wipers cover. Their bag of tricks isn’t necessarily large or varied, but here and there the band manages a few decent swings. I do like the vocalist’s rough-hewn screech. I don’t like the fact that she feels the need to repeat certain lyrics about seventeen thousand times per song. For example, the entirety of “Death Rock Song” consists of the lyrics “We won’t fight some more…” which are sung, like I said, long enough for me to go to the fridge, get a beer, and drink half of it while pondering when they’re gonna come out with a new Air Bud film before the rest of the lyrics, “Gonna fight you, and your gonna die” come in. I mean, grammatical errors aside, I just don’t get the sentiment of that song, much less the need for so much repetition. I mean, Street Legal, are you gonna fight some more or are you not? Anyway, I like the hazy, dirty recording and some of the really nice high-end guitar work, which the band seems to favor in lieu of straight bar chords or whatever. Decent raucous punk stuff; just had a hard time staying interested when certain lyrics were being repeated ad nauseam.  –keith (Street Legal)


STREET DOGS:
State of Grace: CD
Another great one from this Boston band of punkers. “The General’s Boombox” is an ode to Joe Strummer. “Two Angry Kids” is the most rocking of the bunch and is getting repeat plays here at home. “Free” even features some harp from bassist Johnny Rioux. They’re touring all over the place, so go see them live. They deliver every time: blood, sweat, and stale beer included at no additional charge.  –koepenick (Hellcat)


STOLEN MINKS:
High Kicks: CD
More than serviceable music from a band that takes their cues from early ‘80s punk rock and the later trash rock scene. Nothing really all that groundbreaking is being offered up here, but they deliver some catchy, minimalist tunes with much vim and vigor, making a little go a very long way.  –jimmy (www.thestolenminks.com)


STEVE LIEBERMAN:
The Gangsta Rabbi: CD
In the liner notes to this flute and guitar-based album, Steve Lieberman explains that this CD is meant to explain a recent stint in a psych hospital for bipolar disorder, which is a noble enough endeavor. With song titles like “Jew in an Institution,” “Committed!” and, intriguingly, “An Hour to Masturbate,” I was expecting something perhaps influenced by late period G.G. Allin. And perhaps that was there, in part, but mostly this sounds like a guy with a flute who’s listened to the Sex Pistols a few times. But never mind that! Instead, I bring you a statement from his website, entitled “F-CK You Wikipedia,” with original punctuation and spelling intact: “Damn it’s not bad enough you deleted my page there cause one of your geniouses thought of me to be not ‘noteworthy’--but you then after 2 ½ months went and frickin’ deleted a mention of me in the Jethro Tull article--Hey jerks--that hurts--WTF--Damn I’m gonna live my life so noteworthy that even your damn elitist ‘editor’s’ will think that--.” Mr. Steve Lieberman, I wish you the best of luck on this noble quest! If this were a cereal, it’d be a curious combination of granola, Cheerios, and bran flakes! –Maddy (Self-released?)


LADDERBACK, THE:
Trigger Themes: CD
Man, this band is funky. They have a lot of funky breakdowns in their screamy hardcore that tries to impose as many “parts” to each song as possible, therefore making it “math rock hardcore,” I guess. Or, come on, it’s just prog rock made by hardcore kids. The songs usually range around 3:25 minutes each, but, with the 4,000 parts to each song, they all seem longer then they’re supposed to be. There is no doubt they’re tight as hell on this recording and very talented. There is just too much going on. I need to go lay down. I’m gonna invent a new genre and call it “Showoff-Core.” –Sarah Shay (BiFocal Media)


KRMTX:
Ice Hatchet: 7”
Two new songs from a band previously known as Chromatics. The title track is a moody, bass-driven piece of minimalism and the b-side, “Curtains,” follows along the same lines. A bit arty and a little less frenetic than previous efforts, but still a nice change of pace –jimmy (GSL)


KINISON, THE:
self-titled: CDEP
Screamy screamy chugga chug chug whisper moan scream repeat. This is what I think Slipknot would sound like. –megan (Fearless)


KINGS OF NUTHIN’:
Shit Out of Luck: 7”
With a horn that sounds like it was plucked out of an early John Waters soundtrack, a barrelhouse piano and a vocalist who sounds like he chainsmokes filterless Camels, the Kings of Nuthin’ have a lot of style. Whether or not all that flash and gruff humor translates into something you want to hear over and over again is probably something else entirely. This might be best described as skinibilly… lots o’ tattoos, snappy black suits and tie ensembles and a macho frontguy singing about being down in the dumps. –eric (Haunted Town)


KILL-A-WATTS / SWEET J.A.P.:
Split: 7”
Kill-A-Watts: Wisconsonite juvenile delinquency has never sounded better. Biting, blood and hickey-drawing guitars, screams and screeches that could etch a very pretty fuck you into polished steel, drums that could blast holes in walls, and two songs – “1977 Sunglasses” and “X-Ray-Dead-Woman” – that jab quicker than knife wounds in a chicks-gone-bad-in-prison B-movie. Sweet J.A.P.: perhaps one of ten bands that wouldn’t be shamed by the Kill-A-Watts and still be in the musical ballpark, eat fire and blow it all back through the speakers. Donde esta my eyebrows? Burned the fuck off. Much like how Scared of Chaka made the line between punk and garage irrelevant, I dare say Sweet J.A.P. are broadening that horizon while keeping it in the red. Such precisely sloppy assurance and danger-kicking rarely reached this high, this consistently. Awesome split. –todd (Nice and Neat)


KIDNAPPERS, THE:
Ransom Notes & Telephone Calls: LP
As much as i love the Buzzcocks, i consider the graphics on (most of) their earlier releases to be even better than the music therein; technically, that makes their records mild disappointments, which just goes ta show ya what a tough act to follow great graphics are (if you don’t believe me, just ask Adolf Hitler, who, via his design work on the visual emblems of his government, legitimately qualifies as the most influential graphic designer of the 20th Century [seriously], but never did anything worth a shit beyond that). Now, by my calculations, the Kidnappers have the second coolest band logo of all time, that i can think of (the Buzzcocks more or less permanently occupying the pole position since time immemorial). It’s red and orange on black, and it’s got stencils and stripes and lines and an arrow and a quadrilateral and reversed-out letters and not-reversed-out letters and is, quite frankly, a thing of great wonderment and beauty. Therefore, the Sixty-Four-Thousand Euro Question is “Can the Kidnappers actually emit music as stunning as their logo, or are they doomed to try to scrape together a living merely off of the t-shirt concession?” (i take the liberty of assuming the only t-shirt the band sells or will ever need to sell will be a black T with the orange and red logo, exactly the same size as on the album cover. If this is incorrect, please see your way clear to slit the throat of every idiot involved.) Amazingly, on initial stylus-platter contact, the answer appears to be a resounding “JA!” “A Bit of Your Love” lunges out of the starting gate (or do i mean the “paddock turn?” No, i’m pretty sure the paddock turn is not ‘til later) like some sort of long lost Sex Cow era Teengenerate conflagration, spurred along by electric outbursts of cattle-prod keyboards and wisely shifting into a slightly more pop gear in the choruses (i’m thinking the Oysters, from Boston, ca. 1986, but you don’t have to). MY GAWD. THIS BAND APPEARS TO BE AS GOOD AS THEIR LOGO! I don’t know if i should feel happy for the band, or bad for the designer. The album careens along. “Midnight Ritz” lays off the slight pop throttle; “Close to You” opens it up tenfold. Then, for no apparent reason, the album suddenly derails (AH! The ever-persnickety paddock turn at last!), sliding ass-over-teakettle into the bramble bush of a truly forgettable cover of Teengenerate’s “Right Now,” which has, completely inexplicably, been retitled “Hey! Hey! Hey!” and credited as having been written by the Kidnappers. Uh... what say? This rather, er, quizzical selection is immediately followed up by a... uh... Loli & The Chones cover, which fares better in the translation, yet stands as almost as peculiar a sequencing decision as the inclusion of the camouflaged Teengenerate cover was a lapse in anything resembling good judgment. And, although the remainder of the album is certainly better than “decent” (“Break My Heart” is a great punk-popper, “Excuse Me” an unholy cross between 999’s “No Pity” and the Rezillos’ “Bad Guy Reaction,” and “Hit the Road” sounds like the contemporary garage scene meets Road to Ruin) (which is good), the work as a whole never really regains its composure after the whole “Hey! Hey! Hey!” debacle. Logo wins by TKO, but, hey, the quinella still pays. BEST SONG: “A Bit of Your Love” BEST SONG TITLE: “Hey! Hey! Hey!” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Shockingly, the song “Maximum Rock-N-Roll” simply appears to be about rocking-n-rolling to the maximum! Will wonders never cease? –norb (Alien Snatch)


KERBLOKI:
Self-titled: CD
Sweet! Something good! It’s the Beastie Boys if they were more like classical music majors or something. Smart music, smart and creative lyrics, and three handsome white boys named The Chip, Kobra, and Urban Myth. I’m not very rap savvy, even though, like any good punk rock kid, I always loved Public Enemy and the Beastie Boys. It’s such a chill out record, with a tight old school Blaxsploitation feel, and even a wicked synth/electro feel. I’m digging the catchy dance track, “Please Don’t Die in the Ice” (or should that be “Da Ice?”), with its wicked layered synth beats and catchy chorus. This is the song those electroclash kids would be break dancing to. The nice thing about this album is that it goes from live drums/guitar/etc, to drum machine/synth in a matter of tracks. “I.T.U.” is a remarkable cool and chill-out instrumental that reminds me even a bit of Looper. Just you wait. In a year everyone will be wearing Kerbloki. –Sarah Shay (Bifocal Media)


KILL ME TOMORROW:
Skins Getting Weird: CD
More arty noise, this time complete with a Suicide cover. –jimmy (GSL)


KAOSPILOT:
Self-titled: CD
One would assume that a guy screaming full-bore into your ear would garner some level attention being paid by the listener. Surprisingly, that wasn’t the case here. –jimmy (Level-Plane)


JUNKYARD:
Tried and True: CDEP
Junkyard were a late-’80s hair metal band featuring Brian Baker from Minor Threat and Chris Gates from the Big Boys on guitars. As you may expect from Brian Baker and Chris Gates, Junkyard had more imagination and creativity than bands like Motley Crue or Poison, and they had a way of writing songs up from the gutter, which you wouldn’t really expect from a limos-and-groupies-scene band. They were also one of my brother’s favorite bands, so Junkyard mostly reminds me of good times hanging out with him. But make no mistakes, this is late-’80s hair metal. Now, apparently they’ve reformed without Brian Baker (he’s currently in Bad Religion, but he did write a song on this EP), and they’ve recorded new songs or new versions of old songs. There are a couple of hair metal songs at the beginning, a dreaded rock ballad, a pretty cool country song, a remake of one my brother’s favorite songs, “Simple Man,” and another metal song at the end. –sean (Heatslick)


JONNY AND THE GROADIES/CORPSE FUCKS CORPSE/GIFT OF GOATS/GET GET GO:
Untitled: LP
Jonny: Pummeling, vaguely black metal sounding noise. Corpse Fucks: Disjointed noisecore with tons of tempo/meter changes. Gift of Goats: One stunner of a band who play wholly varied, wholly original hardcore (apparently no small feat these days). The closest equivalent I can muster is Black Flag at their pain-drenched prime, although these guys sound nothing like them. Get Get Go: More skronk, this with more going on than the first two bands in terms of dynamics. Can’t say much else about these bands due to a startling dearth of info included. Recommended for the Gift of Goats tracks alone. –jimmy (Omnibus)


JEALOUS SOUND, THE:
Kill Them with Kindness: CD

My friend Brent rarely tells me about bands, but when he does, he’s always right. He turned me on to The Weakerthans; about a year or so ago, he told me that I needed to check out The Jealous Sound, a band featuring ex-members of Knapsack and Sunday’s Best among other indie / punk luminaries. The debut EP consisted of five songs of outstanding emo-inflected indie-pop which didn’t fall too far from the previous trees and whetted my appetite for more. Thus, the full-length. It’s a tremendous pop album – there’s not much here in terms of the stuff that usually fuels me (like politics, revolutionary sentiments, etc.), but it’s an addictive record, one which practically demands to be put on repeat and allowed to play for about a week. Blair Shehan’s characteristic breathy vocals combine with Pedro Benito’s ringing guitar lines to yield a slew of majestic pop songs, each of which seems better than the one before.

–scott (Better Looking)


J-CHURCH/ STORM THE TOWER:
Split: CD
J-Church: Keep it fast. After years of sporadic listens to J-Church, I’ve finally come to this conclusion: if they keep it buzzing, Lance Hahn’s voice is just another instrument in the maelstrom. Think Everything Falls Apart, Hüsker Dü: equal parts melody and velocity. Bone snapping, crunchy parts and finger-snapping happy parts. The first two songs on this split, “Terror of Love,” and “Ghost Writer,” I’ll say are two of my favorite all-time J-Church songs. However, the other two songs take heavy ether whippits and where Blake of Jawbreaker had a voice that could break hearts, when Lance’s is up front, it’s more thin and has a tinny tint to it, which I don’t find as satisfying. Plus, 5:43 and 6:38 are too long for songs to clock in at. That’s simple math. Storm the Tower: Not so good. The bar’s been raised so much on hardcore. Not as rip sawing as Crispus Attucks, not as youth-vital as Life’s Halt, not anywhere as inventive as Tragedy, nor as insightful as Strike Anywhere, or hacksaw-through-femur dangerous as DS-13, they get repetitive real fast. Sorry. –todd (Broken Rekids)


JAGA JAZZIST:
Animal Chin: CD EP
I had always respected GSL for being a label that always released interesting music – even if it wasn’t particularly to my liking – and doing it independently. However, this release – as well as a slew of other back catalog albums I had recently ordered – turned my head and perspective completely around. It’s an electro-fusion-jazz album with plenty of blip-and-twitter-core and a fair bit of drum and bass which basically means it’s a stylistic mess which just so happens to be a brilliant gumbo of skittering beats and soothing jazz textures – think Goldie, Roni Size, Jazzanova and Underworld. This lengthy (nearly forty-three minutes) EP is all over the musical map but somehow it all coheres, congealing into a beat-driven mix of 1970s cool jazz and jazzy jungle’s decidedly 1990s reworking of it. –scott (GSL)


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