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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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STANDARD AND POOR:
Monsters in Uniform: CDEP
I will be honest, “standard” and “poor” was fully what I was expecting, but I got something much better than that. They throw down the up tempo rock ‘n’ punk not unlike something that Duane Peters would be involved with (but way more coherent). The anti-gun song was a refreshing point of view to hear, too! I would love to hear more from these guys because four songs were just not enough for me.  –ty (snppunk.com)


STITCHES:
D-: 7” EP
This is apparently the first in a new series of releases Modern Action’s planning, “Raw Inadequate Practice Tapes—Only for Fans.” According to the liner notes, this was “recorded on Mike’s birthday Sept. 8, 1993 at Freeway Entertainment on a shitty ghetto blaster with a T-shirt draped over it to muffle the cymbal ring.” That, and the title, pretty much covers what this sounds like. Just shy of three hundred copies pressed.  –jimmy (Modern Action)


STOVEBOLTS:
Over the Limit: LP
Dirty southern punk. Sounds like Zeke but shaved and cleaned up just enough to get inside a normal people’s bar. It’s released on Blahll Records, which is pretty much the exact onomatopoeia for my reaction to this record. Grade: C.  –Bryan Static (Blahll, blahllrecs.com)


STRAIGHTLINE:
Final Redemption: CD
Twelve tracks of German, metal-tinged fastcore, American West Coast style. Think Pennywise with a hesher guitarist (That’s not an oxymoron, is it?). Really nothing to either complain or rave about. Well played though, and I am certain they whip up quite a pit when playing live.  –Garrett Barnwell (Morning Wood, morningwoodrecords.com)


STRUNG OUT:
Transmission.Alpha.Delta: CD
We’ve reached a new era in the life of punk music: a band who has reached a career span of twenty years or more isn’t necessarily one of the founding (or pioneering) groups from the late seventies or early eighties anymore. This is uncharted territory. Point being, it’s difficult to speculate what music will be like in fifty years or so. Will people still look to the Beatles and Led Zeppelin and consider them timeless classics? Or, in the case of punk rock, will kids still be looking back through the Ramones discography, as many of us did so vigorously? Strung Out is most definitely a pioneer—skatepunk wouldn’t be the same without them—but they go along with the rarely mentioned subgenre of just that: skatepunk. Not to be confused with skate “rock,” either. Same place (and state) of origin, but for a different world and, more importantly, a different generation of kids. And, one would argue, that it’s their mutual relationship with Fat that’s kept both the bands and the label alive, due to neither of them ever quitting. They owe that to each other. If either Fat or the core groups (Lagwagon as another example) had called it a day, neither may have carried on. Coincidentally, modern skatepunk turning twenty also marks the anniversary of my life as a punk enthusiast. Strung Out’s first album, Another Day in Paradise, was one of my earliest favorites. When I first heard Mad Mad World, my brain exploded. There literally couldn’t have been a better song at that time for me. Then, in came Suburban Teenage Wasteland Blues, which didn’t leave my walkman for months. You could imagine my excitement when I first heard through the grapevine that they were coming to my town—shitty little Ottawa—playing Spodee Odee’s, that summer of ‘95. Shows of that era taught me that the scene was a safe, fun place. Punk wasn’t dangerous anymore. If you fell at an all-ages show, someone was there to pick you up. These gigs were integral to my upbringing. Fast-forward twenty years and times have changed, but not that significantly. Nineties nostalgia is in full swing, but not that it matters; Strung Out has always drawn good crowds, and from what I gather, it never really fluctuated. Not all bands have been so lucky. I’ll be truthful and admit I haven’t heard any of the records the band has released in years, at least until Transmission.Alpha.Delta landed in my lap. It’s great, too—not to mention exactly what’d you expect (and desire) from such a consistent band. It’s not impossible for them to still be winning over new fans, either. While the sound’s typical, it’s still fresh, in the sense that wouldn’t be hard for someone who listens to, say, From First To Last or something similar to be into this. But let’s back up here and clarify that they don’t sound anything alike. At all. That said, the production and overall youthful sound of this new album could win over fans of all walks of life, which is the crux of the issue. With all that in mind, it’s still the same Strung Out. There may be a few NWOBHM nods in there than I would have imagined, but the band hasn’t been shy about their fondness of metal. Take in all that, and add that Jason Cruz’s voice is still as sharp as it ever was—not something a lot of bands/vocalists can say. Tracks like “The Animal and the Machine” are ragers, while “Modern Drugs” could be a borderline ballad/hit. Comforting to know some things… don’t always change.  –Steve Adamyk (Fat, fatwreck.com)


SUCCESS:
Radio Recovery: CD
Success has its boat docked in the same pond of pop punk that a lot of other bands do, but somehow manages to stand out. Is it the bright blue paint on the hull? Is this analogy going nowhere? In some cases, I am reminded of what Less Than Jake might sound like if it dropped the horns and pseudo ska. That’s no slight. I’ve always thought—on the right day—LTJ can dish out a pretty tasty pop punk nugget and this CD has them aplenty. Perhaps I do a disservice by the comparison, though, as these guys are not merely aping a known entity. Radio Recovery is filled with a working class lyrical sensibility and genuine emotion that places this album well in front of those of their peers.  –Garrett Barnwell (Red Scare, redscare.net)


SUPERCRUSH:
I Don’t Wanna Be Sad Anymore: 7”
Some fairly catchy, melodic, 90’s alternative/nearly power pop from a band from Vancouver, BC with members of hardcore bands. Members come from known HC bands like Go It Alone and Lights Out. The record comes off like a less strong Lemonheads or Teenage Fanclub, but the songs are considerably more sophisticated than most who try this sound these days. This single sounds a whole lot like the slew of singles that came out on labels like Summershine and Bus Stop in the early ‘90s. I would be inclined to check out a full length by Supercrush, which could be excellent if they fine tune the songwriting just a bit.  –frame (Debt Offensive, debtoffensiverecs.bigcartel.com)


SURVIVAL:
Shayda: Cassette
Real heavy metal guitar leads all throughout this record. The first track really threw me and I wasn’t sure whether I should take it seriously. After a few listens, “Living with Depression” is just a little off from the tone of the rest of this tape, but still finds a way to mix in. In retrospect, I think that song would be a better fit later on in the album. From the looks of the band’s bandcamp page, they have put out a wealth of material and have been in the game a long time. After a few listens, I started to really get into it, though I’m just not a big metal fan in general. If you are though, these guys shred. Check it out.  –Kayla Greet (NBRD)


SWEET COBRA / GET RAD:
Split: 7”
It’s easy to forget what a record represents, especially if you listen to a lot of them. There’s much more than screams and chords and drumbeats packed into that wax. There’s the moment of inspiration in which the song was conceived, along with whatever triumph or turmoil the songwriter might have been going through at the time. There’s the hours of practice, building an idea for a song into something that works. There’s the friendship. There’re the arguments. There’s the sweat put into the recording process. There’s life itself. It’s all there, etched into the grooves. And it will always be there. While both sides of this split are killer, the songs on the Sweet Cobra side of this split are particularly packed with life, with energy. It’s inescapable and it’s amazing to listen to. The first two songs were the last conceived by Sweet Cobra’s old guitar player, Matthew Arluck. He died before the songs were recorded. But here they are, together with a third track, a raw guitar piece, the last thing he ever recorded. He may be gone, but he left a bit of his life on this record. Here’s hoping for many, many spins.  –mp (Hawthorne Street)


SWORDWIELDER:
Grim Visions of Battle: CD
Amebix, anyone? These Swedes have knocked off the first couple of Amebix 7”s, even down to the back cover writing. Musically, it’s even a tad darker, heading into the first Deviated Instinct album territory. It’s a downtuned, crusty mess of cheap homebrew and hashish. I hope to god this lot look like the stinky bag of rags the aforementioned bands did. If stenchcore is in your vocab and/or you have a studded denim vest, you may want to dig in.  –Tim Brooks (Cubo De Sangre, cubodesangre.com)


SYSTEMATIK:
Bondage: LP
Some choice hardcore, courtesy of a band hailing from Bremen, Germany. Tunes have a nice feel of influences—old and new, European and U.S.—not too fast or slow, and they have enough sense to keep it simple while suffusing everything with just the right amount of grandeur. Nice work.  –jimmy (Sabotage)


TEENAGE CHAINSAW:
Self-titled: Cassette
This six-song demo packs a lot of the correct things onto a cassette. Awesome, overdriven punk’n’roll with Guitar Wolf-quality feedback, ratchety drums, and angry vocals. “Get Bent Baby” has the curiously classic-sounding chorus. There’s nothing like it when a chorus grabs you for the first time in the midst of six songs you’ve never heard before. Lyric sheet included and appreciated in this case. It’s a solid tape, most certainly a band to look out for.  –Billups Allen (teenagechainsaw.bandcamp)


TELEVISIONARIES, THE:
Self-titled: LP
If you play with passion, your unoriginal band can still be good. Rochester surf trio The Televisionaries has some licks, but they play sloppy and slow, and the recording is so brittle you can’t hear much but guitar. I’d drink a couple extra if I saw these guys in a bar, but this record doesn’t justify its existence when there are so many Ventures albums in the dollar bin. –Chris Terry (reeltimerecordss.bigcartel.com)


TENDENCIA:
La Trampa: CDEP
It might be easy to dismiss this as just another metal record, which I almost did on the first listen. But the more I listened, the more this three-songer revealed its charms to me. Tendencia plays metal out of the Master of Puppets-era Metallica escuela de metaleros but with growly grindcore vocals. It gets punky at times with some three-chord progressions thrown in with the guitar noodling. Wait, did I hear conga drums? These guys are from Pinar del Rio, Cuba, where the mere act of having long hair or being in a rock band can land you in constant trouble with the law, so they already have my admiration. They add in echoes of traditional Cuban music like guaguanco beats and the chorus of “Hasta Siempre Comandante” (an elegy to Che Guevara). Sometimes it works and sometimes it sounds like being between floors of a house where the rebellious teen is headbanging upstairs and the parents are downstairs listening to the music of their youth. I am looking forward to their next record.  –Lisa Weiss (Rigid)


TENEMENT:
Predatory Headlights: 2 x LP
Appleton, WI’s Tenement unveils at long last (three years without a release) its magnum opusPredatory Headlights in the form of a twenty-five song double album. Carefully constructed and sequenced, we are treated to the sounds of a genius band at its pinnacle, utilizing its perfected approach to pop punk songwriting without a throwaway track to be heard. I’m not a fan of the word “accessible,” if only because it’s often misused in describing a band when they’ve attained a certain level of mainstream attention or acceptability. Being mentioned and acknowledged by quasi-mainstream outlets the way Tenement recently has makes me suspect of the intentions of “alternative” music sources. However, Predatory Headlights has the sort of instant appeal found only in certain records such as Descendents’ Everything Sucks: a classic album so masterful that working your way backwards through the band’s back catalog only makes you appreciate their prior works all that much more—and believe me when I say that Napalm Dream and The Blind Wink are masterpieces in their own right. The dream for most bands is to live comfortably from their art but then, sometimes, you have a band like Tenement who also appears to spend their free time super gluing cigarette butts and empty tall boys to their porch. Knowing that about them puts my mind at ease of the thought of them possibly ever betraying any of my expectations, and so I wish continued success for them.  –Juan Espinosa (Don Giovanni, dongiovannirecords.com)


TERROR AMOR:
Beibi: Cassette
AJ Davilla from the much-heralded band Davilla 666 returns here with a new band and a new record on Burger Records. From Puerto Rico, the songs are (still) primarily in Spanish, rocking dutifully, and drenched in fuzz, not unlike many other bands on the label. Anyone familiar with Davilla 666 will notice a slightly poppier garage sound, but this isn’t such a departure that old fans won’t be excited to get their hands on this one.  –Mark Twistworthy (Burger, burgerrecords.org)


THESE CREEPS:
Sinning in These Suburbs: CD
A motley crew of punks from Plymouth (U.K.) have taken their inspiration from a bunch of bands favoring the crack rock steady sound—Choking Victim, Leftover Crack etc.—and have thrown in a hint of Operation Ivy for good measure. Hence, the result is a combination of punk, ska, hardcore, and a smidgeon of reggae all played out with rough and ready quality. The lyrical content addresses many of the negative aspects of the daily grind, yet the music is generally upbeat and catchy, creating a number of earworms that are more than welcome to burrow into my head and pop up at will.  –Rich Cocksedge (AWOL, awolrecords.bandcamp.com)


THEY LIVE:
The Satanic Verses: CD
Gotta admit, between the black-on-black cover lettering, song titles like “Pentagram” and “Prince of Darkness” and an album title like that, I fully expected something a bit sillier than this actually is. What you get is their interpretation of “death punk,” which sounds like it’s culled from influences ranging from hardcore to metal to mid-period DC proto-emo to Samhain-inspired death rock. The songs can get a bit on the long side from time to time, but they do sound like they’re striving for their own patch of dirt in a very crowded underground, which is wholly commendable in these days when too many bands are prone to ape instead of draw influence. Not to imply that what’s here is shit, but I can easily see them growing from here into serious contenders if they keep pushing at the edges.  –jimmy (Drink Blood)


THOMAS JEFFERSON SLAVE APARTMENTS:
Straight to Video: LP
I’ve long been curious about this Columbus, Ohio band because of its name, but never bothered to search it out prior to this re-release (mostly due to laziness, and my always forgetting to write out a list of bands/records I want to find.) Apparently, TJSA got mixed up in the early ‘90s major label indie rock fooferal, releasing their debut (Bait and Switch) on an American Records subsidiary. These guys are too good and (probably) too drunk for that clown town. So, how to describe TJSA? The guitars are big and noisy, the vocals are discordant and wobbly (drunk?), but plenty powerful. Songs about fucked up parties we’ve all been to (“SecretMuseum”), culture done wrong (“When the Entertainment Ends”), and something called a “Rump Government” (don’t know what that is, other than a fucking catchy song). If someone told me TJSA sounded like it was a Midwestern band, I would somehow know pretty much what it sounds like. Now that I’ve listened to more TJSA, I find myself wondering: here’s a band that wrote a song called “The Internet Is Bad Pot” back in the late ‘90s. What would they call the internet now, a K-hole? Or is that reference too ‘90s? What do I know? I never did Special K.  –Sal Lucci (Straight To Video, straighttovideo.org)


THURNEMAN:
De Räknar Vara Dagar + The Early Years: CD
Describing Thurneman as a “hardcore” band is about as inadequate as calling gumbo a “soup.” All the usual ingredients are there—frenetic beats, flailing chords, angry vocals, and heaps of aggression—and they make it quite clear they can fuck shit up with the best of ‘em, but what they do with all the above within the confines of the forty-three ADD-length tracks here (the disc’s opus, “U.Ä.R,” clocks in at an epic two minutes and thirty seconds) is what gives the meal its sabor. Just when you think you’ve got ‘em pegged, the often guitars veer off into single-note, ringing leads, or they start off on an oddly melodic churning and grinding tangent, the bass lines start loping, and you suddenly realize you’re in some tastier territory than you’d initially bargained on, something that vacillates between the gritty Midwestern and the melodic wings of the hardcore genre. This does serve as a (more or less) discography for the band, featuring tracks from a full-length, assorted EPs, and some comp tracks, so you get the one-stop convenience of picking up some great tunes from one of the more interesting hardcore bands that have come along in recent years, and serious value for your buck. Recommended.  –jimmy (Gaphals, gaphals.se)


TIMESHARES:
Already Dead: LP/CD
Timeshares’ 2011 debut album Bearable is one of my favorite records of the past ten years, resulting in high expectations for this, the follow up. It was pleasing to immediately hear that the key components found on the debut were all still in place with well-structured arrangements being matched by lyrics capable of drawing me in with ease. The songwriting also retained the same sense of no stone being left unturned to ensure tracks contained exactly the right hook, riff, key change, and/or drum fill to make the final result as complete as it could be. The one main difference being that the band has allowed the influences of Lucero and The Replacements into its music, mixing Southern and Midwestern rock in with its more established pop punk style. This change brings in a slightly more mature aspect to the music, and one that I am wholeheartedly down with. Bearableis a stone cold classic and early indications are that Already Dead is in the same ballpark.  –Rich Cocksedge (Side One Dummy)


TSUNAMIS, THEE:
Saturday Night Sweetheart: LP
Currently my favorite Indiana band, local to me here in Bloomington. If The Trashwomen were of today, they might be Thee Tsunamis. Girl group doo wop-esque vocals, plus drum pound, plus bass thud, plus fiery ‘60s riffage equals what you want to hear. Recorded to tape at Magnetic South (also of Bloomington) then rubbed in some of that Magnetic South secret sauce (see also: Apache Dropout, Vacation Club, Purple 7.) Include the following on your summer mixes: “Trash Talk,” “Dummy.” The Midwest continues to be alright! –Sal Lucci (Magnetic South, magneticsouthrecordings.org)


TSUNAMIS, THEE:
Saturday Night Sweetheart: LP
Upon seeing the cover of this album—three ladies in leather jackets with hairstyles that look like they’re from the 1950s or early 60s—I released a sigh. “Not again,” I thought. I feared this would be another in a long line of all-girl groups that played bubblegum, sha-na-na pop punk. Boy was I wrong (and happily so)! The sound that this Bloomington, Indiana-based act jam out over thirty-two minutes is fuzzy, dirty, and poppy. Yes, there was still a ‘50s-influenced sound with harmonies, but the distorted vocals and fierce guitar work on some of the tracks separates Thee Tsunamis from the pack. There are enough things going on to make for a fresh sound: the guitar on the opening track, “Female Trouble,” sounds like the Reatards, while the opening riff on “Drag” sounds like they’re channeling the Misfits (more of that, please). One song is sung entirely in French (“Un Psycho”) and “Kill Kill Kill” has a cool contrast of the vocalist singing “I wanna kill” in a smooth delivery while there are handclaps in the background. I’d love to hear some more of the heavy guitar work and a little less of the pop sound, but, overall, this was a great surprise.  –kurt (Magnetic South, magneticsouthrecordings.org)


T-TOPS:
Self-titled: LP
Formed from the ashes of the awesome Pittsburgh band The Fitt, T-Tops play sludgy, aggressive garage punk that sticks with you. With Don Caballero bassist Jason Jouver involved, there’s some serious musicianship at hand, with a definitive Jesus Lizard influence. This long overdue LP is impeccably recorded and well showcases the band’s signature complex, yet accessible, style. A class act of a release all around, Big Neck wins again. T-Tops are tops, man!  –Art Ettinger (Big Neck)


TUBLOIDS / BRONxxx:
The International Skaterock Split: LP
Bronxxx made me happy as soon as their first song started. They are a Japanese skaterock band who recorded their songs in a Mexican restaurant and claim that they do not skate. You had me at Japanese Mexican restaurant. Sometimes you can hear how much fun a band is having just in their recordings. That’s the case with these guys. This is classic skaterock, the type you’d play over and over on the Thrasher cassettes in the ‘80s. The Tubloids has a more surfy skatepunk sound with Rancid-esque vocals. These guys are from Vancouver, B.C. and appear to have recorded their songs in a studio. Flip this record—either side it lands on, you can’t go wrong. Rip it!  –Ryan Nichols (Beer City, beercityboyz@beercity.com)


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Razorcake Podcast Player


·IMPULSE INTERNATIONAL, THE
·BAD LUCK CHARMS
·GHENGIS CON JOB
·FLASH EXPRESS, THE
·HEADS, THE
·Anything Boys Can Do… and Mark of the Ninja
·Dirty Marquee, Self-titled 7''
·Razorcake Issue #02, Archived
·STÖJ SNAK


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