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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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PRIDS, THE:
Glide, Screamer: EP

The second EP from this Portland (OR) based three-piece is three studio tracks and one live. Opening with the title track – which starts with an empty, delicate bass then in comes guitar and drums. This the dance club hit. Reminding me a bit of New Order, then bursting into a strong, dark rock. Low, even sexy, male vocals croon. Backing it are female vocals that are slightly off time from the main, which makes the vocal tracks very distinct. A five minute track that doesn't seem to ever last long enough. "Human Astronomy," is where you can see more of the slight shoe-gazer feel, female vocals are lead this time – where they come off coy and even sensual, with a monumental musical backing that at times even reminds me a bit of Pink Floyd (but in a good powerful way, I swear! Circa Meddle. Fuck you if you don't like Floyd!) – just because the breakdowns are so spacey and strong. Sending you into space, and then back down into the world you know – or wish you didn't. A quick two minute song, it makes quite an impact. Okay, that’s a little dramatic. But the Prids make me feel transcendent. What can I say? Side B, don't forget to slow the speed down (that gets me every time). More male vocals, "Persona Solara," is another danceable track. Songs about girls always make for drama with bands like this. Strings, keyboards, and more sensual vocals. I love the bass line that goes throughout this song, it really carries it – giving that Jesus & Mary Chain Psychocandy feel. The live track, "Duracraft," which is from their first EP (of the same title) is okay. The recording isn't the best. It sounds like it was recorded more in the audience. You can hear people talking and chit-chatting over screams and howls. I'm sure the studio track is lovely – a very Joy Division sounding track with a very pissed off sounding Mistina on vocals. Clocking in at almost seven minutes, it is a tad long as well. But shit, all the howling and screaming people do at the end sure make you wish you were there, beer in hand, dancing. If the Prids were around in 1985, the girls would have worn the same lipstick as Mistina, boys would have the same hair as Jarius, everyone would wear the same eyeliner as David, and they would have been here, there, and everywhere. Overall a great EP. I'm excited to hear more – hopefully a full length in the future. Yeah, neo-new wave! –Sarah Stierch

–Guest Contributor (Self released)


PITS, THE:
My Life In Ruins: 7” EP

Anthemic punk reminiscent of the UK Subs. I dug it.

–todd (Rapid Pulse)


PETER AND THE TEST TUBE BABIES:
Supermodels: CD

More straightforward in approach than Soberphobia, this has more balls while still managing to keep their trademark repetitive guitar leads and poppy hooks intact. While not quite as crucial as their earlier material, there’s some mighty fine work to be found here, especially “Let’s Do Lunch,” which I’d love to blast full bore out the window of the building in downtown Los Angeles where I work. Good listening.

–jimmy (Captain Oi)


PETER AND THE TEST TUBE BABIES:
Soberphobia: CD

I remember not liking this album much back when it first came out. My biggest gripe back then was that the intensity that fueled Mating Sounds of South American Frogs was largely absent, leaving some lackluster pop songs with a tinge of a punk edge. While I think that assessment might’ve been a little harsh, I still don’t think, fifteen years later, I was that far off the mark. It’s very true that there’s a decided lack of “oomph” to the proceedings and some of the tracks here are obviously filler, but there are some good songs to be found here as well, most notably “Keys to the City” and “Spirit of Keith Moon,” either of which almost make this worth the green and the inclusion of assorted B-sides and live tracks, however, further sweeten the deal considerably.

–jimmy (Captain Oi)


PEAR OF THE WEST:
This Means Little Resistance and the Proof of Existence: CD

Mix in the undeniable catchiness of the Teen Idols when Heather sings or does a duet (like the Idols', "Twenty Below") , along with the jumpiness of Hi Standard, and a clear and radiant guitar, you've got Japan's Pear of the West. Female-fronted goodness, and it's pop punk, but in the new mutation that I'm liking so much more. Instead of tapping the pock marked vein of trying to cop what both Screeching Weasel and early Queers did so well, bands seem to be rotating the crops and pulling up the roots of some of the best catchy punk and instilling it with their own dirt and growth to fill in the spaces. Best Japanese to English translation line: "I'm full of drunk." Cool.

–todd (Snuffy Smile)


PANIC, THE:
Self-titled : CDEP

Dude, I need some new underwear. I just shit myself. The Panic are right at the top of the best mix of new and old hardcore I've heard in years. Too fast and blasting to be strictly melodic, yet too catchy and swinging bat-like to be dismissed as a stale homage, this is some exciting, penetrating stuff. It's tough, not macho. It's chaotic but not muddy or out of focus. It's recorded fucking perfectly, with the burrs and jagged edges intact, but all the instruments are clarion clear. Woo! Combine Gorilla Biscuits, Negative Approach, Out Cold, Reagan SS, and Kid Dynamite in a cement mixer really fast and pour. Heavy, thick, and designed for burying lesser bands. Highest recommendation.

–todd (Bridge Nine)


PANIC ATTACKS:
Watch the Skies!: 7” EP

Everything about this SCREAMS '60s slop, but no, just another record by another Queers clone I can use around my toilet as a guard against any potential damage incurred to the floor beneath by drunk, errant-aiming guests that might happen by.

–jimmy (www.panicattacksgetwell.com)


PAGENINETYNINE:
Document#8: CD

This is some of the best hardcore I’ve heard in quite some time. It’s driven with such force, but it takes control of that drive, fully in charge the entire time. It feels natural to go into a breakdown after the balls-out rock that precedes it. And the breakdowns? Damn, they’re heavy. It’s recorded so that it comes together as a band, not individuals, not one overpowering another. It’s dense and filled with so much going on in every track. On my second listen I began wondering how many tracks they had to record to get that complexity. Then I looked at the liner notes. There are eight members. Eight! They have two vocalists, a drummer, two bass players and (count ‘em) THREE guitars! That helped explain things. The packaging is amazing as well: black gatefold with the graphics and text pressed into it. The booklet inside is glossy and filled with these great illustrations. They provide lyrics, thankfully. I’m not so great at deciphering them. They’re on a brief hiatus from shows now, just getting back from touring Europe, but I know I’ll be looking to see them the next time out.

–megan (Robotic Empire)


ORGANIC:
The Life and Times of Sal Sagev: CD

Exactly the sort of dime-a-dozen emo that precipitated my initial downgrade of fervor for punk from fanatic to enthusiastic, when emo began to slide from being something reasonable – nay, GOOD (Embrace, Rites of Spring) – to being the cookie-cutter atrocity-cum-joke it is today. It’s heartening to know a new generation of bands is carrying the torch to fuck it up for today’s kids.

 

–Cuss Baxter (Microcosm)


ORGAN, THE:
Sinking Hearts: CDEP

After the self-release of The Organ's two-song 7" earlier this year, everyone in VancouverBC knew they were bound to be something special. Imagine if The Smiths and Joy Division became one, and were all women. This is what you'd get. Numbed, soft, and delicate-at-times vocals backed by that Johnny Marr jangly guitar, thick carrying bass, and drums that give you the feel of ‘60s trash rock, and of course – an organ. The Organ is the second vocalist of the band, leading every track to the next. The standout tracks have got to be "It's Time to Go," (which also appears on their self titled 7") and the title track, "Sinking Hearts"; songs about romance and rock n' roll. Numbing at times, the lyrics are simple but painfully expressive, "Remember when I left you/ I couldn't say your name/ or other crucial things like I love you/  oh, that’s a shame." (from "Sinking Hearts.") Alright, start writing those bitter love letters and diary entries. This album will have girls dancing with boys, boys dancing with boys, and girls dancing with girls. –Sarah Stierch

–Guest Contributor (Global Symphonic)


LOS OLVIDADOS:
Listen to This!: CD

Listen to this is right! All I can say about this why, WHY wasn’t this mandatory tuneage released way back when so it could’ve achieved the legendary status it deserves? This puppy has enough vitriol and sonic BOOM to stand up to damn near any other release from the same time period, namely the early '80s, and there’s not one shitty song in the bunch. Hell, even the “hidden” track rocks; a rare occurrence, indeed. I move that we completely forget that this just came out, keep telling ourselves that we used to own it way back when on vinyl and that it’s a damn good thing that it’s now out on disc, ’cause if any punk record deserved reissuing this year, this one is it. Don’t pick this up, get a fail on your “Punk Rock 101” final. Them’s the rules, kids.

–jimmy (Alternative Tentacles)


OI POLLOI:
(1)Six of the Best and (2)Outraged by the System: CD

I received two CDs that feature the greatest hits from one of the long standing DIY anarchist bands that truly matter. From their early beginnings in the mid 1980s to the current, these motley crew of status questioners have been belting it out for years. OP has a way of expelling their rage and making you feel it without using cheap gimmicks. You feel that they mean what they say. They stand on their own and require no comparisons. They came to the states a couple of times to my recollection and I missed them. They are one of  the bands on my list in my head that I truly have to see in my lifetime. Six of the Best features the EPs "Punks n' Skins," "Resist the Atomic Menace," "Omnicide," "Guilty," the self-titled EP put out by the Polish label Nikt Nic Nie Wie and "THC."  It's a timeline of incredible punk at its best. Outraged by the System is a greatest hits package and has many songs from the previously mentioned CD. It's equally as important if you need to sample their venom. If their music doesn't inspire you to think or become active, you are too far gone in conformity. Fans like me appreciate these releases to fill the holes in their collections. Two fingers in the air punk rock for ya !

–don ((1) Rugger Bugger / (2) Step-1 Music)


NIHILISTICS:
Self-titled: LP

This is how re-issues should be. Not only does it sound great, there's a full zine-like insert covering the band, re-running zine interviews and clippings, printing all the lyrics, and giving you a ton of pictures to look at. Originally released in '83, it's hard not to place NYC's Nihilistics in the same on-fire field as The Necros, Negative Approach, and Heart Attack: dark, aggressive, assaultive, no-compromise hardcore deep from the throats and from the hands of people who probably really don't like you. In a roundabout way, I can also see a line between these guys and OC's Bonecrusher; working class, hard-hitting anthems by people you really believe don't fit in and work hard, not just cop a style in the hopes of getting rich. They're also extremely smart. In '83 they pointed out, in no uncertain terms, that war is welfare for the rich. Articulate in a very direct way. Definitely recommended. A pure document of a band that lived by its own rules. Excellent.

–todd (Mad At The World)


NEW YORK REL X:
She’s Got a Gun/ Paranoia: CD

This female fronted band is pretty good. It’s fast ‘80s style punk rock. I have been listening to it a lot. This is a combination of their two previous EPs. When I saw they were coming around I was excited, but they were disappointing live. I found the lead singer and the lead guitarist (with his goofy looking mod haircut) annoying. I just expected something different, I guess. They do have Johnny Kray on drums, who is always great player whether on guitar (The Krays) or drums. So, I decided to just ogle their very hot bassist, Adi. As I tried to keep the drool from rolling down my chin, I forgot about the other two at the front of the stage, making the show more bearable for me. Listen to the CD, but if you see them live, stand to the far left of the stage. You will thank me.

–todd (TKO)


NEW TOWN ANIMALS:
Fashion Fallout b/w Fallin: 7"

I like this. It's charming and happy with some pretty catchy guitars slicing things up in the background. The vocalist, especially on "Fallin' Outta Space," sounds a lot like the main singer for the Briefs – half singing, half kinda mock falsettoing/balls-in-a-vice-ing. The overall result is clean and bouncy, reminiscent of that sliver of time where the first wave of punk hadn't yet lost its steam and was coming from a hundred different directions, hardcore was still to come on the event horizon, and the term new wave hadn't had the time to crank out iffy bands like The Motels. Worth a second look if you see it in the bin.

–todd (Dirtnap)


NEW CREATURES, THE:
Media Brainwash: CD

Snotty mid-tempo punk from a band that, for what it’s worth, included future members of the Medicine Wheel and Guided By Voices. Fun for about half a listen and then my attention was diverted by the trials and tribulations of an ant that was making its way across my shoe.

–jimmy (Smog Veil)


MYSTERY GIRLS, THE:
Self-titled: CD

Some prime rock’n’roll in the MC5-meets-the-Nuggets-comps vein, courtesy of some Green Bay teens who fucking GET IT. To merely call this “damn good” would be a grave injustice. Buy a hundred copies each, make ’em rich, and play loud.

–jimmy (Trick Knee)


STALAG 13:
In Control: CD
In a weird way, on a very small scale, Nardcore is coming back. A couple of weeks ago, I went to see the old Nardcore greats Ill Repute haul their old bones out to rip through one of the best live sets I’ve seen in a while. It was way more than I expected. They tore through a bunch of songs from their What Happens Next EP and basically made me feel like 1984 wasn’t such a bad year. And now, on top of that, Dr. Strange has re-released Ill Repute’s Nardcore counterparts, Stalag 13’s 1984 album In Control. They’ve even included four bonus tracks on it. To be honest, I never heard much about Stalag 13 or In Control, but coming across this re-release, I’ve found a lost gem from a time period and style of music that I love. Musically, Stalag 13 fit nicely in between Ill Repute, Agression, Youth Brigade, and, well, most of the bands on that Somebody Got Their Head Kicked In comp. It’s not totally original now, mostly because so many bands have been influenced by this sound since it first came out almost twenty years ago. Still, I can crank this sucker up and feel like I’m being transported back to a time before a bunch of these bands went metal and before Reagan’s second term fucked everything up. –sean (Dr. Strange)


DEAD KENNEDYS:
Mutiny on the Bay: LP
This is a live album that was recorded back when the Dead Kennedys were a real band and not the current Dead Kennedys Karaoke Fiasco that they’re pulling off now. The songs are taken from four SF-area live shows from 1982 and 1986. Most of the on-stage banner is cut out, and the sound quality is pretty good, so this album is sort of a DK Greatest Hits. It has live versions of “Too Drunk to Fuck,” “Holiday in Cambodia,” “California Über Alles,” “Moon over Marin,” “MTV – Get Off the Air,” and nine more of your favorite DK songs. It’s actually pretty good. I don’t know where you stand on the whole issue of the other three Dead Kennedys screwing Jello Biafra out of all the songs he wrote and suing him for money that they thought he should’ve made and re-releasing all the old DK albums on a label that claims to be “independent” but has a history of working with Warner Bros., Enigma, and BMG and released early stuff by Ted Nugent. But, if none of that bothers you, pick up this record. –sean (Manifesto)


SOOTHE:
To Prove Our Existence, We Play This Music. To Prove That We Are Alive, We Sing : 7"
Soothe has to be the most ironic band name going, because what they play is anything but soothing. It’s a sonic assault of distortion and feedback and noise. But it’s really well-managed noise. In fact, I haven’t heard noise managed this well since Godhead Silo. It’s not really fast, but it plods out heavy and mean like Godzilla hunting down King Kong for the first ever monster movie title bout. On top of it all, a woman named Chippe screams, not looking for a melody or a song anywhere, but digging deep inside of her and letting it all out before she has time to understand it. This seven inch reminds me of Soothe’s other noisy Japanese counterpart, Bleach(mobile), and when I listen to this record, in my mind, I can see Bleach(mobile) going nuts in a live show at Mr. T’s. And then I start hoping that Soothe somehow puts together a tour of the US, so I can go see them and, well, be anything but soothed. –sean (Devour)


SWINGIN’ UTTERS:
Dead Flowers, Bottles, Bluegrass, and Bones: CD
The Swingin’ Utters have never been afraid to travel in strange directions musically. Throughout their past few albums, they’ve blended Pogues-influenced Irish folk songs with Stiff Little Fingers-style punk rock, but added all kinds of wrinkles to that sound. They’re not afraid to throw in a banjo, accordion, mandolin, or whatever else they can get their hands on, into a song. Dead Flowers even has a vibraphone in it. And really, I can’t think of any punk band that’s made music this diverse and multi-layered since the Clash. This new album pushes the envelope even on the precedents that the Swingin’ Utters have set for themselves. The songs are really all over the place, from folk songs to ballads to hints of early Swingin’ Utters street punk. The album is so varied that, at times, it’s hard to imagine that one band wrote and played all of the tunes. And it’s this type of variety that has me undecided about this album. I like it, even with its multiple personalities. At the same time, I miss the full guitar sound that earlier albums had and I know that and I’d still rather spin the Swingin’ Utters’ Juvenile Product of the Working Class or Five Lessons Learned than this new one.
–sean (Fat)


MORAL CRUX:
Pop Culture Assassins: CD
It’s not difficult to explain Moral Crux to people, but it’s very difficult to explain why they’re so fucking awesome. Basically, they play infectious pop punk in the vein of all that early nineties Lookout stuff: the Queers, Screeching Weasel, Mr. T Experience, Green Day, etc. They’re not newcomers to pop punk – they’ve been at it since around 1989 – and they have all their poppy guitar hooks and sing-along choruses down perfectly. What makes them different, though, is that they replace your basic girl-trouble-bubblegum lyrics with intelligent, catchy lyrics about radical, left-wing politics. Songs that musically sound like they should be called something like “I Wanna Be a Teenage Ramone” actually have titles like “Prelude to a Riot,” “New War Generation,” “Stocks and Bombs,” and “American Nightmare.” It’s hard for me to describe just how fun it is to hear a happy, bouncy song and sing along the lyrics, “I’m going window shopping with a brick.” Also, with this new album, Moral Crux has finally found a way to smoothly blend in their Side Effects of Thinking-era Psychedelic Furs influence into the songs, and this adds one more cool layer to an already cool band. –sean (Panic Button)


BOILS, THE:
The Ripping Waters: CDEP
I’m not really sure how or when pirates invaded oi, but I’ve been noticing a trend of pirate-influenced songs in some of the latest oi releases. And I don’t know why I like it, but I like it. Why not? Isn’t it better to sing along to a pirate song than to sing along to, say, some geeky kid’s heartbreak, or to sing along with a dozen consecutive unity songs? This new EP by The Boils grabs the pirate theme and rocks with it. There are five songs, not all of them pirate tunes, but all of them are fast, growling, straight-ahead oi songs that are vocally similar to the Stiff Little Fingers (which is never a bad thing when it’s done well, and it’s done well here) and musically in the vein of The Business’s live show (meaning it has all the energy and rockin’ anthems, but none of The Business’s questionable, slow-down-and-clean-everything-up production values). –sean (Thorpe)


VERMICIOUS KNID, THE:
Days That Stand Still: CDEP
Tap your chest, hang your head, and cry, motherfucker, cry. The problem with this recording, much like the problem with most emo, is that it lacks balls. Cojones. Testicles. Guts. Intestinal fortitude. All that shit. Records like this are soundtracks for people who have failed and given up trying. As such, they diminish my life for the brief period of time that it takes me to skip to the next disc. –scott (Antiantenna)


VANDALS, THE:
Internet Dating Superstuds: CD
I think I might have liked this album about ten years ago, but that was also when I started feeling like Epitaph and Fat had so completely inundated the market with shit that sounded the same that I quit listening to punk because there was no goddamned difference between one record and another and none of it spoke to the things I was feeling and going through. I loved punk because it always seemed to relate to my life, but for a few years in the mid-1990s, punk rock fucking sucked. Thankfully, bands like Dillinger Four, Hot Water Music, PUKU 13, and a slew of other Mongols who resembled hordes rode in on steppe horses and decapitated motherfuckers like they were playing cranial golf or polo or some such shit and saved the scene from wanky Forbidden Beat bands writing fart songs. I’m sure that this record is catchy as all hell for the kids who like Blink 182 and The Ataris and other pop punk or for people who thought that the Inland Invasion/ Sex Pistols show was a good idea, but this means absolutely nothing to me or my life. I know my roots. These ain’t them. –scott (Kung Fu)


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