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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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TRAINWRECK RIDERS:
The Perch: CD
Competent alt.country! That’s about all I can really put down about this album. Countryish stuff (which to me does not mean the Top 40 pop-rock that’s on the majority of country stations) is odd in that it works better when it’s either massively understated (i.e. early and late period Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger) or really schlocky heart bearing. I mean, yeah, Bright Eyes is overwrought but it sticks with you, and Hank Williams songs are about as emo as it gets. In the case of the Trainwreck Riders, this album delivers relatively energetic twang with laid back vocals that’s good for driving through long stretches of desert and plains, but there’s not really any reach out and grab me moments of bleeding all over the place conviction like with someone such as Slobberbone. –Adrian (Alive)


TROUBLEMAKER:
: 7"
Quite the mixed bag with these fellows. On one hand, they kick out five short blasts unflinchingly reminiscent of Paint It Black’s earlier material—even the vocals are eerily similar to Yemin’s. On the surface, it’s some reasonably decent stuff, if a little unremarkable. But the lyrics manage to come across as simultaneously self-loathing and yet terribly corny—the breakdown on “Loveless” is what sealed the deal for me: the music stops and the singer belts out “No one will ever fucking love me!” I just can’t deal with hardcore vocalists talking about how alone and unloved they are when there’s three or four other dudes standing behind them serving as the musical vehicle for their self-obsessed lamentations. It’s a big world out there, rife with problems—if you’re gonna focus exclusively on yourself, you’d better have something better than a Cat In The Hat-styled A-A-B-B rhyme scheme going on. –keith (Neutral Territory)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Dangerous Intersections: 7"
Not sure how much of this stuff is exclusive, but
Traffic Street
’s put out a pretty solid winner here. The Closet Fairies come out swinging with their cover of “Skumpunk,” which sounds like a snot-nosed Fleshies covered “Sonic Reducer” in about ninety seconds or so, and The Dopamines come across as a more frayed and intelligent Copyrights. Weakest track is by Apocalypse Meow, where they wax poetic about how cool it would be to be a baby again, and Todd Congelliere—with more of a URTC flair than a Toys That Kill one—does an awesome, keyboard-heavy jam that somehow sounds forlorn and toe-tapping all at once. Three out of four ain’t bad at all, especially when I realized I just found a few new bands that I’ll be checking out in the future. Watch this label. –keith (Traffic Street)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Dangerous Intersections IV: 7"
This is a four-band pop punk comp that is not my thing, but all the bands sound pretty good. The standout for me is Barrakuda McMurder whose short entry on this record sounds a bit like The Queers and has a similar boyish sense of humor. The Strait A’s “Go Away” is female fronted and, while not snotty enough for my taste, has the sensibilities of a great punk anthem. All four bands have personality and write descent songs. Again, it’s not my thing, but I get a good feeling off it. If your tastes range from Hot Water Music to The Queers, I would think this would be a great record for you. –Billups Allen (Traffic Street)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Bring It On Back: A Compilation Dedicated to Simplicity and Honesty: CD
Assembled by one Daryl Gussin of this here publication, this hodgepodge mix of live recordings and vocal outtakes (like an answering machine message) was apparently all taped using a digital camera. While the recording quality expectedly takes a hit (the insert refers to the lo-fi element), the assortment is endearing and earthy. The project’s finest moment is its first: “Rio Manzanares” by Panacea String Band is a smooth, gorgeously done piece about a river that, in a better world, would punctuate a farewell between two lovers at a Spanish drive-in flick. God Equals Genocide’s contribution (“Ya Never Know”) is pretty good, too. Other inclusions of note: a recording of a recording of “Joe Hill” by ambitious activist/entertainer Paul Robeson and the swooning and sweet “Lovesick Lycanthrope” by Mincing Pixie. –Reyan Ali (Self-released)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Annihilate Your Life: CD
A predominantly hardcore compilation featuring, in order of appearance, DIHYF, Salted Wounds, Clusterfux, Hardsole, Man0Alive, Cunnilingus, Döersovit, Truckasaurus, Conrn Whisky, Fetal Hymen, Infernal Racket, Dead Pan, One Per Coffin, Zombie Hate Brigade and Carrion Crawler. Would’ve liked a wee bit more diversity in sounds and styles, but most of the bands here ain’t bad at what they do and fans of the genre should find much to get them off. Best tune here, however, is the tune by Ernie and Cookie Monster they no doubt jacked from a Sesame Street record or broadcast. American treasures they both are and, despite their well documented addictions to rubber waterfowl and cookies, worthy of all the adulation they’ve received over the past four decades. –jimmy (Rawker)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
A Product of Six Cents II: CD
Forty-nine tracks of the fast and faster are on this here disc (nine of which come from the APOSC I 7”). A lot of the tracks blast by like blurred blazes of rage. But don’t worry, this isn’t forty-nine tracks of lackluster Spazz and Infest idolatry and we-can’t-play-so-we-play-fast-hoping-that-nobody-will-notice-and-call-it-grind grind. Just like most comps, there’s going to be some stuff that you can’t stand and some stuff that you can’t live without. This comp has a lot more of the good than the bad. And, furthermore, the stuff that you wish wasn’t around is so fast and so short that it is hardly worth mention. Once you assess the track and realize that you don’t wanna hear it, the next track will be playing. You will be reaching for the case to see which band is playing so that you can take note of which band is desensitizing you more often than not. –Vincent Battilana (A Product Of Six Cents, myspace.com/aproductofsixcents / To Live A Lie, tolivealie.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
8 Acoustic Comp: CD-R
Three-way split of acoustic stuff. Julia (um, I think that name’s been taken, ma’am) contributes three straight up folk ballads, essentially all about the dude that got away. It’s inherently cheesy stuff, but reasonably well done, all things considered. Coffee shop rock, but Julia’s voice does have a nice, forlorn quality to it. The Dead Pawns are a not-so-good bluegrass band with way tuneless and bellowed vocals, and Joey Corman just sounds like your average guy playing shit on an acoustic guitar: a little awkward, with some randomly decent moments. Certainly didn’t think Julia would be the best of the bunch, but she was. The best part is that while this is some tame acoustic folk stuff, the cover’s positively brimming over with a bunch of skulls. Also contains a Dead Pawns song called “Ballad Of A Blasphemer” and a quote from Jesus on the back cover. Pretty odd release overall. –keith (8)


TV SUICIDES:
Nerve Damage: CD-R
Lyrically it sounds like they’ve been immersing themselves in the same less obvious subject matter the early incarnation of the Misfits occasionally mined. Musically they like the mid-tempo middle ground of proto-hardcore and feature a singer that sounds like he’s been listening to Rollins-fronted Black Flag bootlegs circa 1983. They ain’t bad on the whole, but the recordings here sound like fourth generation mp3 rips of mp3 rips that weren’t that good to begin with, with that weird squeal-in-a-tunnel quality to the cymbals. –jimmy (TV Suicides)


TROUBLEMAKE / TURKISH TECHNO:
Split: 7"
Preamble (or pre-ramble, your choice): At some point over the past year, I became aware of Traffic Street Records. I was on a rather well known “social networking” site looking at band pages. Turkish Techno, being a band I recently heard and liked, was one of the bands I was looking at. There was something on their page about an upcoming release on
Traffic Street
(which is this release). This, naturally, prompted me to look into this TSR. I saw that there were a few upcoming releases that interested me from TSR. I was mostly stoked that the second (planned) release involved TT. As it turned out, several of the releases slated for release after this split came out before this one—so goes punk rock. Anyhow, I’m glad to have it in my hands finally. Troublemake: Here’s the band that I hadn’t heard of, and whose name was making me unsure whether I wanted to hear them. After having heard them, I can say that I would listen to ‘em again. They lay down two solid tracks that sound like more technical (early Lookout!-era) Queers with Justin (from Anti-Flag) filling in for Mr. King. In other words, Troublemake deliver some decent pop punk that isn’t exactly by the numbers. Middle ramble: Now that I think about it, I don’t know why I had no problem checking TT out, while being skeptical about Troublemake because of their name. Turkish Techno: Gruff-vocaled punk for the bearded and non-bearded alike. Their songs on here are bit simpler and more straight ahead than those on the Brokedowns and Shang-A-Lang splits, but they’ll still make you hop up, down, and all around. The only thing kinda whack about this side is that the two Turkish Techno tracks were recorded on different occasions, which is immediately apparent aurally—but really nothing at all. –Vincent Battilana (Traffic Street)


TROPIEZO:
Creando Nuevos Enemigos: CD
It appears these kids are making one helluva concerted effort to become the Minutemen of modern hardcore. This is the third release I’ve seen from them in the past twelve months, with another sixteen songs that rarely pass the two-minute mark to add onto an already heaping pile of similar tunes. Mind you, I’m not complaining, ’cause they are easily one of the best bands out right now, but one has to wonder where the fuck they find the time to crank out so many songs, let alone rehearse them to the level of taut, stop-on-a-dime perfection they consistently turn in? Do they have jobs? Do they sleep? Are they human? That said, this is another collection of spastic hardcore that flies from one tempo to the next mid-song in a way that has to be heard to be understood, delivered with a level of precision one expect more from a Teppan-Yaki style chef than a punk band. What all this hyperbolic rambling translates into is that this is one prolific and seriously badass band and they’ve released another CD worthy of much attention and listening time. –jimmy (discodehoy.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
DC-Jam Skate Rock Vol.1: 2xCD
When I saw the front of this disc, the first thing I thought was “Whoa, what’s with the crappy computer art? I wonder what they’re trying to pass off as skate rock.” Well, when I flipped the case over and started reading the bands, I was treated to a who’s who of skateboard fueled punk rock both past and present. The old guard is well represented by bands like JFA, Big Boys, McRad, Minus-One and Government Issue while the current rippers are led by the likes of Frontside Five, Off With Their Heads and Wednesday Night Heroes. Not to mention several rad bands that I had never heard before. This compilation stands up well with the early Thrasher comps. I’m stoked for Vol. 2!!! –ty (DC-Jam)


TERRIOR BUTE:
Realm Dwellers: CD
Terrior Bute is a three-piece band from Milwaukee and their sound is comprised of yelling party vocals, keyboards and drums. It seems like their sound is reminiscent of the defunct Nebraska screamo/punk/post-hardcore band, Bright Calm Blue, minus guitars. The disc has eleven songs in twenty-six minutes and it does a good job of getting its point across in that time. The first and last tracks are filler but otherwise this is the musical equivalent of an exclamation point. I say that with the stipulation that I have a feeling that Terrior Bute is one of those bands that is better live than they are on their recordings. I can only hope their live show matches the energy they seem to display on the album. –kurt (Vicious Pop)


TAMARYN:
Weather War: 7"
Appearance-wise, Tamaryn would have fit in well at a 1980s goth club. But the song contained on this record is far more complicated than anything you’d expect from a wannabe post-punk, dance hall gloom number. Interesting on all levels, the dark, brooding track makes me wonder what else the corny yet compelling Tamaryn has up her ruffled sleeve. This one-song, one-sided 7” on the elusive Hell, Yes! label is limited to just 300 copies (250 of the regular version, and 50 of a limited version with a gold, silkscreened cover). I think I’m going to have to start wearing eye shadow if I hear it again. –Art Ettinger (Hell, Yes!, myspace.com/hellyeshellyeshellyes)


THIS BIKE IS A PIPE BOMB / SHELLSHAG:
Split: 7"
On this 7” both bands cover each other and Shellshag actually goes on to do their take on “The Promise” by When In Rome. I’m a sucker for ‘80s pop culture nostalgia so with their side having that and “What I Want” by This Bike is a Pipe Bomb you already know one third of these six songs are great. As far as This Bike is a Pipe Bomb’s side I don’t think these guys are capable of making a bad song. The first two tracks are a little more shin diggin’ than their other stuff but some how they manage to make me want to keep listening to country down folk music. Genres aside, all these tunes are just so upbeat sounding and sing songy that I can’t help but keep spinning this 7”. –N.L. Dewart (Starcleaner)


TITLE FIGHT:
Last Thing You Forget: CD
Crisp production, big melodies and a vocalist that can hit all the right notes and still sound a little ragged and roughhewn. While I’m always impressed with the seamless quality that bands like this almost always showcase playing live, it takes a lot more to sell me on an album. And I’m really not sure why, as Title Fight seems to be mashing all the right buttons, but there’s something here that’s falling just a little bit flat. It just seems like nowhere on The Last Thing You Forget do these guys ever really ever go off—there’s a sense of restraint here that just doesn’t work in their favor. I feel like they’re capable of going ape-shit crazy but they’re just meekly walking around pretending to be orangutans, know what I mean? To their credit, I’m hearing echoes of bands like Saves The Day, Lifetime and labelmates Death Is Not Glamorous, but they’re distant ones—Title Fight’s well into the process of firmly carving out their own place. It’s just that I don’t really feel like they’re quite there yet. Decent melodic punk stuff but just a little too unfocused and tame for me. –keith (Run For Cover, runforcoverrecords.com)


TODI STRONGHANDS / VICKI B.:
Untitled: CD
This is a singer songwriter CD with songs striped down to vocal and a guitar track. The album insert has cut and pasted song listings in what looks like a photocopied picture all in a worthwhile DIY package. This split effort between Todi Stronghands and Vicki B. is refreshing in the fact it doesn’t seem to fall for any of the typical singer songwriter traps. There’s no glockenspiels or Hammond organs to show how indie or classically trained their friends are. Some nails are left not hammered on this CD with some random guitar strums being a little off at times. What these two deliver here is straight ahead guitar folk songs that feel like they’re made from pure intentions. –N.L. Dewart (Todi Stronghands)


SUBCITY:
Where: CD
A rootsy, retro ska album that branches out into a multitude of traditional genres with positive results. The most basic template is the U.K. ‘70s 2 Tone revival, but they mix it up with plenty of straight up soul and some incredibly tasty horn arrangements. SubCity’s songs tend to be mid tempo to slowish, confidently playing back in the pocket instead of the frantic sameness that drives me away from most ska. Highly recommended as a soundtrack to a pleasant day outdoors with friends and beers. –Jake Shut –Guest Contributor (Transistor 66, transistor66.com)


SUPERSUCKERS / HOOKED ON SOUTHERN SPEED:
Split: 10"
Supersuckers and HOSS sing mostly Christmas songs on this split 10” with a highly detailed, Christmas-themed gatefold cover by Baron Von Evil. Snap one up, quick-like – you’ll be like a kid at, well, Christmas. Plus, on this first pressing, the label forgot to list the Baron—if there are future pressings, it’s likely this will be corrected. Supersuckers: “Call It Christmas Time”, “Good Night for My Drinkin’”; HOSS: “Merry Christmas Dad”, “Santa Loves Black Sabbath”. Well done, ZK. –thiringer (Zodiac Killer)


TALBOT TAGORA:
Lessons in the Woods Or a City: CD
Now we’re talkin’! It took me a second to get into this, but now I really like it. My mind did wander at times, and I feel like the album took a while to get going, but it’s interesting and kind of weird, which often times really works for me. There are lots of varied tempos, even within the same song. Kind of discordant and cacophonous. The vocals, which, oddly, sometimes reminded me of Perry Farrell (only creepier), add to that. I might put them in the same camp as bands like the Chromatics, only not the next section over, maybe one across the park. What kind of camps do they have in Seattle, anyway?! Some of the guitar sound might or might not be Sonic Youth-inspired, and there were times I heard a wee bit of the A Frames. There were also some things about it that reminded me of another great band I got to review lately, Golden Triangle, and they are (coincidentally?!) both on the same label, Hardly Art. The artwork is great; there’s a really nice insert with lots of drawings (including a sweet moth picture) and lyrics. I think I will get into it even more after a couple more listens. Favorite lyrics so far: “…the roads are red but they crucifixed it.” And ah-ha! The rest of the lyrics in that song refer to a camping trip! It’s all coming together now…. –Jennifer Federico (Hardly Art)


STRONGEST PROOF, THE:
Robot Eats a Steak: CD
A pretentious glob of emo, rock, metal and other stuff that rambles on six-and-nine-tenths songs longer than it should’ve. Made me wish I lived in an alternate universe where either I didn’t have ears or they didn’t have hands. –jimmy (Phratry)


STRAWMEN:
Jack Rabbit: 7"
Although tinny, I hear something decent brewing beneath the screamy-shouty vocals. Fast and simple country twang with a sloppy-punk bent that could stand some beefing up and tightening up. The unbridled vocals need some containment but all in all a serious effort that just needs time to solidify into a cohesive group. “Jack Rabbit,” “Red Barn” and a cover of the Compulsive Gamblers’ “Sour & Vicious Man.” –thiringer (Foul & Fair)


SPREAD ‘EM:
Pizza Crisis: EP
Wow, a humor band that actually plays decent music. Kind of a rarity. Spread ‘Em crank out tuneful hardcore punk that has some Oi! elements here and there. They have a song on here called “Jamie Lee Curtis Fingerbang” so you know you’re in store for some lowbrow stuff, but funny, just the same. Which is certainly better than any number of “whacky thrash” bands that sing about whatever whackass, or uh “whacky thrash” bands sing about. The singer, Brandon, has a great voice. Makes me wonder what he’d be like in a ‘serious’ hardcore band. Comes on clear vinyl. Why they didn’t press it on cheese yellow vinyl is a mystery. –Matt Average (Peterwalkee, peterwalkeerecords.com)


SONGS FOR MOMS:
I Used to Believe in the West: LP
A couple of years ago when I got the first Songs For Moms LP, The Worse Things Get…, I was immediately taken. It was one of those instances of not knowing that you were looking for it until you found it. I’m glad that I heard them before I heard about them because I’m the kind of ass who usually stops listening after “country” is mentioned, and it’s seems near impossible to get at what is going on with SFM without such description. Limiting them to that would, of course, be shameful. In fact, it’s actually kinda hard to peg them—at least for me (which could be a reflection of the fact that I don’t listen to any band close to this more than anything). Anyhow, I mention my high regard for the previous album only because I was extremely hopeful for this LP. I didn’t know exactly what my worry was, but I was worried—perhaps just overly hopeful. Well, dropping the needle on the first track assuaged all my nervousness about the record. SFM roll out another LP full of awesome folk-y, punk-y, country-y songs, but the songs aren’t a rehashing of the last record but do stand well right next to it. This set of songs seems a little older. That is, they seem to reveal further exposure to world. Some of the hope and longing that was on the last record is replaced with more cynicism and anger. Things just sound a little darker this time around. Songs For Moms make being disappointed with the world sound so good. This is definitely one of the best LPs that I have heard this year. Do yourself a favor and don’t sit on this! –Vincent Battilana (Thrillhouse)


SNEAKY PINKS:
I Can't Wait: 7"
So 1-2-3-4 G-Skull re-issued this masterpiece and the world can't be more thankful. Four songs that define a state of mind. Have you ever woken up, shotgunned a beer in your underwear, done a little dance for a little dog, and maybe ate waffles while listening to polka? If yes, then this is for you. This record makes me wanna howl at the moon. –Daryl Gussin (1-2-3-4 Go!)


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