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VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Wild about Jenkem: 7” EP
Ten bands (eleven if you’re listening to the CD-R version of this comp, which includes a bonus track from Nobunny) playing varying hues of punky garage rock, singing about the joys of a certain mind-altering substance that has raw sewage as a primary ingredient. –jimmy (killerdillerrecords@gmail.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Open 24 Hours: CD
I haven’t seen a comp like this in a while: one that isn’t a label sampler so much as an audio blue print. Still, it’s all pretty much just straight-up pop punk with a few pleasant surprises. I don’t think there’s anything particularly hard to find or unreleased, and it gets to be a little much for me at times. But, if you’re one of those “I only like Lookout! and Mutant Pop” types, then this should be right up your alley. –joe (Diner Junkie)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Nardcore 30 Years Later: LP/CD/zine
Labors of love are instantly recognizable from the details. The packaging on this regional compilation is obscenely detailed and lavish (down to clear coat and embossing on the gatefold), maximizing all three formats. It comes with a zine and a CD. Thirty years after the formation of “Nardcore” (Oxnard + hardcore; Oxnard’s about fifty miles north of Los Angeles), its legacy is as thick as the overweight splattered vinyl. In the early ‘80s, beach community punk was formed and based around drinking, surfing, skating, partying, drugs, fucking up, and standing out. Too many of its first wave bands went on to record at Mystic studios, failed to ever get paid, signed away their rights, and teetered on obscurity while bands just south of them like Social Distortion, Circle Jerks, and The Adolescents are in no immediate danger of being forgotten. This comp, thirty-six tracks (on the CD; less on vinyl) of twenty contemporary bands—some of them in it for the long haul, like Ill Repute, Dr. Know, and a track from RKL’s Bomer (RIP)—is a fantastic snapshot of a resistant culture. The songs, by and large, are ‘80s-style hardcore. Not lots of melody, gruffly voiced, quickly paced, some mildly flirting with metal, and based on a tough resilience. Taken as a whole, it’s a powerful portrait of a land that most think as something quick to pass through between San Francisco and Los Angeles. It’s exactly what a comp should be. Nice work. –todd (Burning Tree)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Dangerous Intersections V: 7”
Another addition to the Dangerous Intersections series. Letter V features Troublemake, The Legendary San Diego Chargers, Shang-A-Lang, and Andrew Jackson Jihad. I think my main complaint with 4-way 7”s in how brief they are. And the usual lack of continuity leaves me feeling like I’m at a party where no one knows each other. But a song is a song. And a 7” is still a 7”. Biggest and best surprise: Legendary San Diego Chargers. Mellowed down Replacements punk via dudes who know what the fuck they’re doing. Second best thing: I was really surprised when Chris Mason told me he has never heard the band Space Cookie. If you like Space Cookie, you’ll love this Shang-A-Lang song. Hell, if you like Shang-A-Lang and you’ve never heard Space Cookie: look ‘em up. Troublemake follows through with some pop punk that would probably make a much better impression if it was on an EP of their own. And I find Andrew Jackson Jihad to be completely unlistenable. A slow, folky, upstroke version of “You May Be Right” is completely intolerable. –Daryl Gussin (Traffic Street)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Bridge Nine Summer Compilation: LP
I picked this up only having heard of one of the bands (Paint It Black). So, I didn’t know what to expect when the needle hit the groove. First good sign: LP runs at 45. The heavy stuff was good, but totally incongruous to the melodic hardcore sounds of a couple of the tracks. Leave them off completely, and you could have a pretty kick-ass 7” comp. Otherwise, I’d recommend just picking up a Paint It Black record. The cover art is pretty, a bombed-out early 20th Century movie theater (complete with marquee) plagued by a giant Cthulu-like creature. I’ll keep the sleeve, not the LP. –Samantha Beerhouse (Bridge Nine)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
A Product of Six Cents: EP
Wow. This is either a repress of a comp I first heard about more than a decade ago or a terminally late promotional copy. One would think that with a list of bands including Spazz, Lack Of Interest, Asshole Parade, and Suppression that this would be a keeper. Sadly, even the names of those heavyweights alone could not hold this record up. Too many songs are either poorly recorded or just terribly short to make anything on here memorable. That’s probably why this record never achieved the status of first and second wave power violence compilations such as the Bllleeeeaaauuurrrrgghhh! trilogy or some of the Reality comps. However, Palatka’s cover of Go!’s “Belief in a System” was actually pretty cool. –Juan Espinosa (A Product Of Six Cents)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
A Product of Six Cents 2: CD
These days, I’m pretty skeptical of old genres being resurrected, simply because they tend to get watered down over time and the new bands seem more a pose than anything else. Back in the ‘90s, I was way into what has become known as powerviolence. There wasn’t much happening in aggressive and brutal music within punk during that time. There was crust and grind, but that shit gets dull quick. Then there’s screamo, and that stuff gets annoying as hell, not to mention it’s just emo with a bit more volume. The hardcore of the time was mostly metal bands and straight-edge bands. Stuff with no guts. So, along come bands like Crossed Out, No Comment, Man Is The Bastard, Lack Of Interest, and a bit later, Spazz, and the whole West Bay Doom Ryderz thing like Agents Of Satan, and No Less. These bands were the perfect antidote to the blandness of  “’90s ‘hardcore.” Ugly, brutal, socially unacceptable, loud, abrasive, and just about any other vile descriptive. Eventually that scene “died off” in the late ‘90s as “thrashcore” or “bandana thrash” was taking off. That scene died about four years later, and powerviolence was being resurrected again. Doesn’t take long for genres to get recycled these days. Anyway, long story short, I was expecting this compilation of largely powerviolence bands to suck. Turns out, this is actually pretty good. No one is doing anything new, and with a lot of the bands it’s pretty obvious who they’re trying to emulate in their sound and artwork (a lot of Charles Bronson wannabes). But the music is raging, and that’s what counts in the end. The first forty songs are the new A Product of Six Cents comp, while the remaining nine tracks are the first installment of this compilation, which came out back in 1997. Bands that stood out most are: Coke Bust, George Harrison, A.N.S., Rocket Attack, Asshole Assassination Squad, and xBrainiax, as well as the veteran bands like Spazz, Ansojuan, Asshole Parade, MITB, and PHC. Rip it up! –Matt Average (A Product Of Six Cents / To Live A Lie)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
: 7”
Mischief Brew: I thought this song was going to be a crusty one, not only because it’s called “Patches,” but also because it says it’s “for the virgin haus punks.” Wrong I was! It’s acoustic—just guitar and vocals. The (male) singer has a really nice voice and the lyrics are funny and poignant. Like it. Guitar Bomb: This song, “Middle Finga in Ya Face,” is the second on side A and totally different from the first. Simple punk with a ‘70s rock sound, and dancey in that punky, garagey way. Very short. Really dig it. Rhythm kind of reminds me of “Neat Neat Neat” by the Damned. Endless Mike & The Beagle Club: This song, “In Like a Lion, Out Like a Light,” is apparently about the evils of money and how it holds us back; who will fight against that and who will stay true to the status quo. There is a suggestion in the liner notes that for further discussion on the subject, one can read “Accounting and the Virtues of Anarchy,” if that helps as an additional indicator of the song’s content. I felt that it’s a bit melancholy—there’s a sweet piano part that lends itself to that. I guess, overall, I’d call it a rock song. I wasn’t super into it myself, but it’s well done and I feel what he’s singing about. Wingnut Dishwashers Union: “Fuck Every Cop (who ever did his job)” is an acoustic song with guitar and vocals that have a scratchy sound somewhat reminiscent of Tom Gabel from Against Me! I liked this line: “I know you’ve got to be a little crazy to believe that we shall be free, but I’m insane, and I’m not alone. Unless it’s just the punk rock (yeah!) show talking….” Indeed, sometimes the punk rock shows do talk! I reckon this would be nice as a sing-a-long, and it’s enthusiastic. I wasn’t dying to hear more, but it’s not bad. –Jennifer Federico (Fistolo / Crafty)


USELESS WOODEN TOYS:
Self-titled: 2 x EP
The thing that immediately stands out is the contrasting vocal styles. One is standard hardcore style, and the other is guttural grind growling. At first I was thinking of bands like Spazz, but the grind vocals are more wrecked here. Maybe a cross between Spazz and Capitalist Casualties with the lyrical style of Scholastic Deth. Thrashing skate violence. You get two EPs of this stuff. Not exactly mind-blowing, but not horrible either. One of the singers, Chris Johnson, was unfortunately murdered by some redneck at a show a while back, so this record stands as a memorial. –Matt Average (Learning Curve)


UNIT F:
American Shutdown: CD
Man, middle school me would have fucking loved this: political skate punk not entirely unlike Pennywise or the heavier side of Dropkick Murphys. I’m not sure if the politics of the whole thing make this seem dated or not, but it definitely isn’t ageless. This was released in 2008 and the whole thing is covered in pictures of Bush administration-era political figures. I don’t know what it was about Reagan, but there are so many classic punk songs about him. That was one president that really got the youth wanting to smash the state. Bush, bad president, sure, but the songs he inspired? They just don’t seem that good. There are exceptions, but this album falls short. Some good ideas, bland execution. –Bryan Static (Finger, no address listed)


TIT PATROL:
Gets Less Worse…: CDR
Fair or not, first impression upon seeing this was, “Sweet lord, that’s a terrible name.” Then, upon trying to listen to it, it was already in bad enough shape that I couldn’t listen to it in my stereo, and I started to grumble. Figured out a solution, and after listening, thought, “This is okay, short, fast-paced pop punk, with fairly short songs.” My take: Keep all the songs under a minute, branch out musically a little, really embrace your goofy side, and this will totally rule. I stand by the name part, though. –joe (Madison Underground, madisonundergroundpress.com)


TONGAN DEATH GRIP:
Self-titled: 7”
My many years of intense martial arts training (sitting on the couch watching kung-fu flicks) have taught me that a Tongan Death Grip is a chokehold on your enemy’s Adam’s apple that render’s him speechless and prone. This record is so fucking good (think hopped-up Marked Men masquerading as The Knockout Pills, only from Canada) that I’m speechless (I can handle the prone part on my own, thanks very much). More please! –Jim Ruland (House Party)


TURKISH TECHNO / ANCHOR, THE:
Split: 7”
Both bands here represent the same sound: big, fast, ballsy punk pop in the vein of Dillinger Four. Turkish Techno sums up the common man reality in the potent and poignant track “So Long and Thanks for the Nice Christmas” with bone true lyrics such as “I’ve found brand new ways to fuck it all up again.” On the other side, The Anchor rips it up with the stand out track “It’s Last Call,” where they crank out adrenaline-fueling palm mutes seeped in sugary sweet octave riffs. –N.L. Dewart (ADD)


UGLY FAT KIDS, THE:
Post-Mortem Rock ‘n’ Roll: CD
The band name evokes dopey pop punk, the cover art is a bit death rockish, the song titles could easily be cribbed for Dillinger Four’s next album, and the lyrics indicate a level of intelligence a few marks above the average bunch of punters. The music’s gravely voiced, speedy pop punk bounce, however, was the deal breaker for me. Chalk it up to personal preference, and I’m sure they’ll have no trouble finding a throng of giddy fans, but nothing here really struck me as revelatory or anything other than completely “safe” and nonthreatening to the status quo, save for maybe those who might take offense to the occasional use of the word “fuck” in a song. –jimmy (myspace.com/theuglyfatkids)


UNIT F:
American Shutdown: CD
An open letter to Unit F: The Bush regime is gone. If you put pictures of George, Don, Condi, and Dick in your liner notes you just come across as dated. I guess, after listening to your music, you like things that are dated. This is California skater punk done without much originality. They drop Greg Hetson’s name a bit, if that means anything. (He played on one track on this.) I had to listen to this in small doses, as it was too boring to get through in one sitting. I don’t know who’s taking all the good music at Razorcake HQ, but maybe you could leave some scraps for the guys that live far away and get their stuff sent to them? Pretty please? –Ryan Horky (Finger, fingerrecords.com)


TIMEBOMBS, THE:
I Belong in Hell: LP
The gory pictures of two guys with their heads blown off on the front and back of this record coupled with the cryptic, practically illegible lyric sheet inside had me thinking I was in for a treat. Yet, while it’s not a complete waste of time to listen to this, this record didn’t leave me wanting more. Rough around the edges, fuzzed-out hardcore punk played by four guys who probably have nihilism written across their knuckles. I’m no recording engineer or anything but it sounds to me like this record could have had a better mastering job. I’ve heard that these guys have some EPs floating around out there, which also leads me to believe that perhaps an LP’s worth of material was just too much for these ears. –Juan Espinosa (Cowabunga)


TIM VERSION, THE / USED KIDS/ PRETTY BOY THORSON/ NINJA GUN:
Split: 7”
This spilt is jack-of-all-trades jaunt that blasts forward with side A only to careen into side B, which simpers down into some sleepy time alt country tunes. The Used Kids track is a stand out only for the fact that it’s a “Willie and the Hand Jive” rip off chord progression. –N.L. Dewart (ADD)


TIGERS JAW:
Spirit Desire: 7”
Ha ha. Okay, this record is named Spirit Desire. What kind of hippie shit is that? Pretty stupid name, but the packaging for this record is notable. Lots of layers, and, for some reason, it has two sleeves. One sleeve is for just the vinyl, and the other is for after you add the cover and inserts. Seems a bit redundant and expensive to ship, but what do I know? As for the music, I’m unimpressed and pretty bored. Unfortunately, the packaging steals the thunder of the record. –Corinne (Tiny Engines, TinyEngines.net)


THIS IS HELL:
Warbirds: EP
Solid youth-crew hardcore from these guys. If you like Bane, and the current stream of bands along those lines, then you’re bound to want this, if you don’t already have it. The musicianship is tight as hell, with a beefy guitar sound and strong drumming. The vocals are a little distracting at times. They sound cracked, despite the gravelly delivery. However, the lyrics are good, and above the usual standards of this scene. The Warzone cover of “Crazy, But Not Insane” is not bad, but their cover of Inxs’s “Never Tear Us Apart” is atrocious. Everything was going good, and along comes that song... Ouch! –Matt Average (Think Fast, thinkfastrecords.com)


TEST PATTERNS, THE:
Blackout: 12” EP
Man, I am doing my best to keep expectations for cool bands to a minimum. And then I heard the new Patterns’ 45RPM 12” and shityeah—why shouldn’t bands get better and better with each record? Yeah they had a rad 7”, didn’t burn rubber, but was exciting and fun; made the guys having sex in my alley stop and listen. The new 12” smokes. Essential new wave punk sounds for our times, memorable tunes, and smooth vocals that get inside of ya. It flows great with vital energy I’m not getting from enough other bands. It’s not enough to plug in the keyboard, people. You gotta provide the electricity. Is that cheesy? Whatever, I love this fast little record. –mike (Tic Tac Totally)


TENEMENT:
“Ice Pick” b/w “Summer Street”: 7”
It’s not Tenement’s fault that I’ve been listening to a ton of Hüsker Dü lately, and I don’t want this to come off as a lazy, “Oh, they’re from the Midwest, are a trio, play catchy, multi-moded punk rock, really do rock, but with some flair and artistry, so which one am I gonna pick: ‘Mats or Dü?” type of thing. In much the same way that songs off of Zen Arcade work, the listener can totally zone out from and be totally involved in a song at the same time. There’s an incessant, implied buzz and a careful harvest of notes all the way through, from a full-on assault, to the quieter times, to when the instruments go for interesting walks. Side A’s the more direct blast pop track. Side B’s the exploration without the wank. This shit’s wide open. Go Neenah, WI. –todd (608 Kisses)


TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET:
They Came from the Shadows: CD
I’ve seen Teenage Bottlerocket a couple times live, but this is the first time I’ve actually had one of their albums to listen to (unless you count the Lillington’s CD someone lent me). They Came from the Shadows pretty much confirms what I had thought from seeing them live: they’re kickass. Normally, I’m not a fan of Ramones-core stuff—the area in which I would say Teenage Bottlerocket is pretty firmly rooted—because it usually sounds too formulaic and recycled. Teenage Bottlerocket are so good at churning out catchy, 4/4 punk with hooks that I can’t hate on them. My favorite songs have to be “Not Ok,” “Forbidden Planet,” and the absolute best song on the album “Without You.” To elaborate on the “Without You” love for a second, it’s the type of sappy, broken heart song that lyrically is about the farthest thing from tough, but the fact that it’s played fast makes it okay for dudes to blast loud (while crying on the inside). The total skate punk anthem “Skate or Die,” and the totally schizo “Fatso Goes Nutzoid” are pretty rad tuneage, tambien. This album is worth checking out. Interesting side note, the song “They Came from the Shadows” has almost the exact same melody as the Pointed Stick’s “Out of Luck.” –Adrian (Fat)


TAKERS, THE:
Taker Easy: CD
Hot damn, this band is fantastic! Members of Whiskey & Co. have started a new band called The Takers and put out one of the strongest full-length albums in recent years. Coming on very much like Uncle Tupelo with more ‘70s country influence, this is an incredible batch of songs. Fans of Drag The River and the Weight will want to be all over this band. I have to admit I am an absolute sucker for this style, but bands must have the songwriting chops to pull it off. The Takers have all the songwriting they need and plenty to spare for lesser groups. This record also works extremely well as an album. With no particular standout song, it is just a great batch of songs that makes me play it over and over again. I know it seems roots rock/alt country is becoming another punk rock retirement plan, but as long as there are bands this good I will welcome the trend. Enough of this review business; I gotta hear this record again. –frame (Suburban Home)


SWEET ONES, THE:
We Work Harder: CD
A bit o’ funk, a bit o’ soul, and a whole dumptruck of pure rock‘n’roll wapatuli that’s been gathering strength in a garbage can in the back of the garage and gets stirred occasionally with a canoe paddle under the cosmic influence of Mike Watt. Good stuff. This record is perfect for that blissful moment when you punch out from work on Friday and you’re looking forward to the weekend’s swath of destruction. Or for painting a bedroom, which is how it worked for me. –The Lord Kveldulfr (Crafty)


SUNNYSIDE / THE LEGENDARY SAN DIEGO CHARGERS:
Split: 7”
Both bands: Lyrically, a constantly revolving door of happiness to sadness, resolute conviction to desperation, exultation to exhaustion. Is partying still partying? “Is this fun still fun anymore?” It’s the musical equivalent to not-quite-right-tasting but well-within-your-price-bracket wine. Keep on drinking it and wash hate down, burp up some love, and try your best to not to piss your pants. Sunnyside: Musically, think along the lines of Dan Padilla, Tiltwheel—kindest devils you’ll ever meet, or badly bruised angels? The Legendary San Diego Chargers: Fronted by Jesse Thorson of Pretty Boy Thorson and the Fallen Angels would like to express the following sentiment to the West Coast: just because a show is free, whenever a touring band plays, pass the fuckin’ hat. Good wishes do not fill up gas tanks, and it’s an insult to play a full house show, then walk away more broke than when you walked in. Music is our church. Pay your respects, dumbnuts. –todd (It’s Alive)


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Razorcake Podcast Player


·Featured Book Reviews from Issue #89
·LIBERTINES US, THE
·BAYONETTES
·BLACK BREATH
·GRANDMA’S BOYFRIEND
·PENNYWISE
·VARIOUS ARTISTS
·TRYING #5
·MONIKERS / BANNER PILOT


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