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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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HINDI GUNS:
Do or Die: CD
The opening shot here, “Sugar Drone,” sounds like it was pilfered from the Poster Children’s a-list of tunes. The rest are steeped in that same quasi-psychedelic post-post punk vibe so many of the late ‘80s/early ‘90s indie bands loved so much. Good stuff on the whole, though I’m not quite sure why they selected Yukio Mishima as their cover model. Maybe for no more reason than just ’cause he was an interesting cat. Look him up ’n’ learn something new, kids. –jimmy (myspace.com/hindiguns)


HINDI GUNS, THE:
(Many Many) Miles Away: CD Single
It seems there are two The Hindi Guns—one from Los Angeles and one from Portland, Oregon—and appears that they share a couple of band members. Not that it matters much, as far as I can tell. For the record, this is the Stumptown version of the band. This is a great looking CD single designed to look like a 7” record. Unfortunately, the music doesn’t live up to the promise of the packaging. “(Many Many) Miles Away” alternates between a nonchalant groove during the verses and an awkward, cringe-inducing chorus. It’s the vocals that make this so unbearable a listening experience. I want to smack the slack jawed, Lou Reed vocal delivery out of the singer’s mouth. “Loaded Gun” is a Dandy Warhols throw away, which is saying it sucks something awful since the Dandy’s stuff is garbage. College indie rock, Brit pop wannabe schlock. –benke (French Fan Club, myspace.com/hindiguns)


HIGHER GIANT:
Al’s Moustache: 7”
You know those supergroups that showcase aging, once-great punks crooning boring post-punk indignities? Fortunately, Higher Giant is not one of those bands. Instead, they’re an earnest, lovable melodic punk outfit featuring hardcore legend Ernie Parada (Token Entry) on vocals and guitar, backed by members of Warzone, Lifetime, Kid Dynamite, Paint It Black, and The Arsons. Growing up doesn’t have to mean growing into lameness. As simplistic as hardcore pretends to be, there are some fucking sharp musicians hiding in the mix. Four of them are rocking out in Higher Giant. I can’t wait for a full-length from these guys. This EP is on beautiful colored vinyl, with a free digital download included. It’s a truly excellent sampling of unimposing, post-core brilliance. The emergence of Al’s Moustache will make you rethink your desire to euthanize the old guy in the back of the room. –Art Ettinger (Black Numbers, theblacknumbers.com)


HIDDEN SPOTS:
Self-titled: LP
Being a small town punk in his late ‘30s, I’m going to take some stabs here, and it’s based on a talk I had with my friend, Matt’s Incredible. In the mid-to-late ‘80s, punk rock as we know it was in pretty bad shape. The first and second waves had come and gone, yet it was still slowly infiltrating the lower population centers in America: the high desert, the Midwest, the South. So, it wouldn’t be completely out of the question to find a Suicidal Tendencies or JFA record then picking something from an active, pushed band on college radio that was more ruffle-cuffed, overly melodic, and largely English. Cure. OMD. Depeche Mode. The Bolshoi. Icicle Works. Love And Rockets. Flesh For Lulu. Simple Minds. For fuck’s sake, there was no interweb, barely no instant anything when it came to underground music. “New” could be a decade. So when the gruff-voiced Eric Nelson launches into covers of two of the aforementioned bands, a couple of the pins drop in the lock to the safe to further understanding the riches of the Hidden Spots. 1.) Fuck pretense. Blame the world and society, but don’t blame people over thirty for knowing and liking this stuff, word-for-word, unironically. 2.) There are valuable lessons to be learned from “Duckie Rock” (Pretty in Pink) by many bands, especially in the hooks and melodies departments. 3.) Reclamation, Chattanooga Cultural Division, has made one of the most exciting, powerful, and positive full length records in all of 2009. It spits fire at organized religion, the concept of national pride, and hugs its friends closely with as much ferocity. I’m agog on how great this is and I was already on “Mike Pack Shit-stained High Five” bandwagon a couple years back. –todd (Mauled By Tigers)


HIGHSCHOOL NIGHTMARE:
Nightmare High: 12”
This is a really weird record. Highschool Nightmare is from Hamburg, Germany but they sound like a Bay Area band trying to score a deal with Epitaph circa 1999. Big, flashy guitars, empty hooks, and harmonizing vocals out the ying-yang. It’s like a Lars Frederickson And The Bastards jam session that goes on and on forever. Okay, it’s only sixteen songs, but it feels like forever. I’m not entirely convinced this is a real band and not some kind of high concept karaoke stunt. –Jim Ruland (Longshot Music)


HEIZ, THE:
Self-titled: CD
A Japanese trash rock band that sounds like they cribbed the same influences and best parts of John Lennon’s early ‘60s work with the Beatles and recorded it in an empty club with only a room mic, albeit one that managed to pick up some clear sound. The grinder “Please Don’t Cry” appeals to my inner Midniters fan and, on the whole, they do what they do with enough energy and passion that you can’t help but dig ’em. –jimmy (tokyonorecords.com)


HEAVY TRASH:
Midnight Soul Serenade: CD
Had to take a look and see if Tchad Blake and/or Mitchell Froom had a hand in producing this. Much of what’s here sounds like a cross between later period Tom Waits and Los Lobos’ more recent art-slathered take on rock’n’roll and blues, which is by no means an insult. Jon Spencer and Matt Verta-Ray add a bit more of their own sociopathic predilections to the proceedings, meaning the ride is often loud and odd. Great stuff. –jimmy (biglegalmessrecords.com)


HEADLINERS, THEE:
Rain & Blood: CD
This is one helluva album. Incorporating all the music genres that I love, Thee Headliners hit all the marks of Americana, invoking catchy elements of blues and country with male and female harmonies. Jeremy’s baritone vocals are nearly comical in “Howling at the Moon,” which found me doing just that. “Double Dutch” and “SketchCity” veer toward surf and bouncy, high octane garage rock. Just when I thought they wouldn’t throw me another curveball, they upped the ante with Holly’s soulful, “You Don’t Know.” All over the map, but good stuff. Recommended. –Kristen K (Starcleaner, myspace.com/starcleanerrecords)


HARRINGTON SAINTS:
“Bootstraps” b/w “City on Fire”: 7”
Quick two-songer of mediocre street punk stuff. Nice semi-transparent splatter vinyl. Pretty short on content—“City on Fire” smokes just a bit more than “Bootstraps.” Both of them rely way too heavily on their oft-repeated choruses. Street punk records like this—passable but ultimately kind of forgettable—really just make me miss the Beltones. If the Harrington Saints could write something as earnest and defeated and careworn as “Fuck You Anyway,” I’d sign myself up in a heartbeat. Hit me with something like that, guys, and I’m a fan for a long, long time. –keith (Longshot)


HARRINGTON SAINTS / SLICK 45:
Split: 7”
While I can’t say that this is a record I will ever listen to again, or even keep for that matter, I can say if you enjoy oi, you can’t wrong with this. Both bands present some mid-tempo chants and cheers and beers and pisses and shits and all the stuff that makes oi distinct in one nice little 7”. I want to like this (the vinyl! It is beautiful!), but it’s not my style. Like a good romantic comedy, it makes me feel weird, but if you like that sort of thing, I can’t condemn you for liking it. –Bryan Static (Longshot)


GUT REACTIONS:
Bored: 7”
Good ,overdriven, low-fi rock and roll. “Bored” and “Leave Me Alone” are mid-tempo rockers with overdriven guitars and distorted vocals. “Ballad of Logan Potter” breaks the mold a bit into heavier-sounding big beat territory. Good combination of songs. Good band. –Billups Allen (Bachelor)


GRIM FANDANGO / KILL WHITEY:
Split: CD
Grim Fandango: Emo/pop/indie stuff with a singer that should really find another hobby. Kill Whitey: They sound like they take their cues from mid-‘80s college punk stuff and, to their credit, they’re pretty good at it. –jimmy (rabbitrecords.cjb.net)


GREATEST HITS, THE:
Saved My Life: CD
Part of me wants to praise this because it reminds me of Mr. T Experience meets Cute Lepers. Part of me wants to hate it because it reminds me of the Beach Boys meets lighter glam rock. This one is so up in the air it might have left the stratosphere. I definitely say check it out, but I’ll be debating this one for a while. –Bryan Static (No Front Teeth)


GRAVEHOUSE:
Untitled: CDEP
This EP is a soundtrack for the descent to Hell. Equal parts drone, doom, and minimalistic, this is pretty kewl instrumental stuff taking cues from Japan’s Boris and Sunn O))). Three tracks clocking in at just over twenty-one minutes, the first song, “Untitled + Hollow Mind,” starts off with feedback whine and merges into an almost romantic guitar melody. “Of Feather” kicks off with heavy, sluggish riffs layered on top of a slow, methodical, meat-pounding beat. If you dig creepy, atmospheric tones or really like the soundtrack to Rosemary’s Baby, this is for you. Recommended. –Kristen K (Television)


GRAF ORLOCK:
Destination Time Today: LP
Do you like elaborate packaging that looks like it cost a shit ton of money to produce? How about samples from movies in between each and every song? Then boy, do I have the band for you! I’ve set the bar for out of control hardcore with dashes of metal thrown in for good measure at Bucket Full Of Teeth. Graf Orlock didn’t quite reach that level of insanity. There’s something going on behind the scenes that I’m not completely comfortable with as far as the recording production goes. Perhaps the packaging was foreshadowing of what was pressed onto the grooves here. Way too polished and clean-sounding for my liking or for this genre of music. –Juan Espinosa (Adagio 830/Vitriol)


GHUNDI:
Bang Bang Heavy Heavy: CDEP
Irish punk with a hardcore edge from the dirty old town of Galway. Kind of all over the place style-wise, but fresh and unpretentious. Too bad they broke up. –Jim Ruland (Fake Your Own Death, myspace.com/ghundighundi)


GHOSTLIMB / FISCHER:
Split: 10”
First off, beautiful packaging and vinyl. Orange wax, nicely designed sleeve under a transparent/printed bag ala the new Ringers 12”; just a rock-solid visual aesthetic. Seems like Vitriol is run—at least in part—by folks in Graf Orlock, so it comes as no big shock that the graphics here, thankfully, seem just as important as the sonics. On that angle alone, nice work to everyone involved. And as far as the actual music? Fischer seems to have come leaps and bounds from their first 7”, and I actually really liked that record. But this is something else entirely; they’re coming into something of their own, but for comparison’s sake, it sounds like a layered, seasoned, and exuberant North Lincoln. Keep in mind, they’re just a two piece. Which is pretty impressive when one listens to a song like “All the Real Girls” and hears just how full, fleshed-out, and emotionally resonant it sounds. Awesome work. Meanwhile, Ghostlimb’s a new one to me. They’re a snarling, swaggering band that’s a bit hard to pin down. There’s occasional blips of emo breakdowns circa 1993 or so, but it’s all firmly rooted in a kind of rock template and fronted by a guy who’s retainer sounds like it’s made of concrete. They sound like if Go Sell Drugs tried to cover a Rites Of Spring song, okay? Their side of the split is tough and dark and just a bit off and it works ridiculously well. All told, this record is a testament to both of the bands and, yeah, the vinyl format as a whole. Absolutely, totally worth it—I’ll most likely be playing this one years down the road. –keith (Vitriol)


GHOSTLIMB / FICSHER:
Split: 10”
Fischer: in the past, I’ve gotten in trouble for referring to this band as emo, but I just don’t hear the pop punk reference that so many people claim there to be. Between the mathy change-ups and the intricate guitarin’, their sound lies amidst the spectrum of the whole Dischord/Jade Tree/Kill Rock Stars world more than anything else I can think of. But, bless the innovators and their constant struggle for new, sometimes-interesting things. Ghostlimb: this band kills it with their brand of all-out, forgive-no-one hardcore that’s modern in its presence, but applied to the approach of yesteryear. Both these bands offer top notch material and anyone inclined to check out two of California’s most daring, should check out this record. –Daryl Gussin (Great Plains/Vitriol)


GEARS/D.I.’S, THE:
Rockin’ at Ground Zero/Rare Cuts: CD
Rockin’ at Ground Zero is one of those releases that anyone even remotely interested in underground music should have in their collection, period. No discussion, no hall pass, no excuses. Yes, it is indeed that goddamned essential, a pitch-perfect example of what happens when girl-crazy, A-bomb fearin’ teenage brats intent on giving punk a rockabilly undertow instead stumble upon bona fide art. It’s been released in a number of incarnations and formats over the past nearly thirty years, and this time they’ve augmented the album’s original fifteen tracks and the oft-included three-track Let’s Go to the Beach EP with five additional demo tracks, so if you happen to be one of the total dweebs who has yet to procure a copy, now’s the time, bucko. Not long after the Gears threw in the towel, Axxel and Dave started a new band, the D.I.s, and for the next few years L.A. punkers confused them with Casey Royer’s band D.I., another legendary Southern California punk rock band in its own right. Axxel ’n Dave’s band took the Gears sound as its foundation and veered off in a number of interesting ways, first following many of their early Hollywood punk peers into roots rock and then slowly adding in some of the hard rock and glam influences that, by the end of the ‘80s, dominated the L.A. club scene. Collected on Rare Cuts are twenty-two tracks spanning their ten-year existence and feature a slew of sidemen who made their bones in some of L.A.’s greatest bands. Maybe it’s age, ’cause I clearly remember seeing the D.I.s a number of times when they were around and really not thinkin’ too much of ’em, but what I’m hearing here causes me to revisit that assessment. Most of what’s here complements Rockin’ at Ground Zero quite nicely, illustrating what happens when you get enough of a chance to take an idea so far that you end up back where you started, which is pretty much what happened—as I recall, once the D.I.s bit the dust, the Gears were back in action, and they’ve more or less remained so ever since. –jimmy (Hepcat)


GARY WAR:
Anhedonic Man: 7”
I got this to review a long time ago. Part of the reason it took me so long to get to it is because I was uncertain if it should be played on 33 or 45 rpm. Although I’m pretty positive now it should be 33, in my book, that’s not a good sign. Come on, friends! Give a girl a clue! If I played it on 45, the music seemed way too fast (although could definitely be right if they’re aiming for techno or something), but the vocals sounded okay. If I played it on 33, the vocals sound a little tooooo sllooow. But, there are loads of effects on them, regardless, so that could be what they’re going for. You see the conundrum? Regardless, as I said, I’m pretty positive it’s 33. Either way, it’s electronic music that sounds like they’re tooling around in space with Gary Numan. Brings to mind Air a little bit. A keyboard and male vocals with piles of effects recorded on a Tascam 3 track. Not my cup of tea, but perhaps nice for a soundtrack at a planetarium. –Jennifer Federico (Hell, Yes!, myspace.com/hellyeshellyeshellyes)


FRONT, THE:
Snake Oil Salesman: CD
This punk‘n’roll five piece out of Wyoming took AP’s vote in ‘03 to tag along on the Vans Warped Tour. Since then, they’ve been honing their craft and touring. Their song structures and guitar riffs recall ‘80s punk the likes of TSOL and Agent Orange. Helmed by a female vocalist, Lauren sounds more like Courtney Love than Poly Styrene or Kathleen Hannah with gravel-throated screams. This is probably the most impressive female vocalist I’ve heard in a long time. Check out “Corner Walker” and a cover of “I Hate Everything” for good examples. Recommended. –Kristen K (Self-released, myspace.com/thefront)


FRIENDS OF FRIENDS:
Deep Search: CD
Very nice interpretation of “I’ve-got-something-in-my-throat” punk. At points, they’ve reminded me of the following bands: New Mexican Disaster Squad, North Lincoln, and Smoke Or Fire, among others. They do this, but their music doesn’t sound erratic or anything. Just for that, good job, sirs. It also helps that their music is good. This is available for free on their website, so there is no reason not to listen to this. –Bryan Static (Levy Park, no address)


FLIPPER:
Love: CD
Flipper has once again shaken off the dirt of death and risen up—this time with assistance from former Nirvana bass playing giant Krist Novoselic—to discomfort the world with more of their sonic elephantiasis. Ten new apoplectic, apocalyptic dirges pustulating with more ennui and existential ooze than all the fidgeting hamburger that was ever in John Paul Sartre’s head. These are the lullabies of an autopsy; an autopsy that’s somehow turned into a Hermann Nitsch performance, where the entrails are hung on the walls like garland and warm and rubbery vital organs become unspeakable sex toys. Back in the early ‘80s, Flipper was obviously a dissonant deconstruction of punk, but now it might be more accurate to say that they’re a dissonant deconstruction of post-punk. It’s dirty work, but somebody’s gotta do it. My only gripe with Love is that their dadaistic sense of humor, exemplified in classics like “Ha Ha Ha,” “Brainwash,” and “The Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly” sadly seems to have been packed into the urn along with the remains of Will Shatter. And Flipper without their absurdist humor is like a thalidomide baby without a clown nose. Hopefully the twisted sense of humor will grow back like a happy little tumor in time for the next album. What’s important now is that Flipper is back and primed to jerk the chains of all sanctimonious punks everywhere. And I, for one, couldn’t be happier. –aphid (MVD audio)


FLESHIES:
Brown Flag: LP
Weirdo DIY punk and arena rock coming together like chocolate and peanut butter, Fleshies, are really one of the most interesting bands in a long time. It’s funny, because before Scrape the Walls was released, I was predicting it to be their most straight forward effort, and then turned out to be very, very wrong. But now that they’ve settled into their own personal studio, taking their sweet time to really polish this one (and bring on more subtle Guns’n’Roses/arena rock comparisons). It’s definitely their most straight forward, and is absolutely great, though it still leaves me a little conflicted, because that weirdness was the charm of their older records. Though after repeated listens, there’s still some weirdness, it’s just a little more buried/subconscious. Either way, Fleshies records are like apples and oranges—you can’t compare them on their own, but they’re all still excellent in their own way. And hopefully they’ll be back from this “hiatus” nonsense. –joe (Recess)


FONTANA:
Self-titled: CD
Some bands sound like Black Flag, but Fontana picked the My War era to be inspired by. Hell yeah. Moody waves of dark, screechy guitar and strained vocals—speedy to slow—and then shove the song into reverse while going 100 mph. Real tight, real catchy, real damn good. I don’t mean a retread of the early ‘80s, dirt but a real exciting new band with that vibe and doesn’t seem to take themselves too seriously. Not to mention you can usually trust the taste of X! Records. The back has Pettibon-style drawings and tiny fucked up sentences. At first, I thought that was taking the Flag image too far. But then I realized it says, “You just see what you think, not what you see” over a drawing of a duck head. Hell yeah. –mike (X!)


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