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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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ANTIBUBBLES:
Pop: 12" EP
A couple items before I get in to the meat of the review: first, the record comes on a slab of solid red vinyl, which I greatly prefer to clear red vinyl. It is much easier to find individual tracks when you want to do that. Secondly, I started this off on the wrong speed and didn’t notice until I got to the vocals. Slowed down, it sounded like it was some heavy, sludgy, lost track from Bleach. Played at the appropriate speed, it’s some seriously catchy fuzz pop similar to that played by fellow North Carolina statesmen Archers Of Loaf or Superchunk. A lo-fi recording with slightly off-kilter vocals, this record definitely benefits by showing off its blemishes, as notes of naïveté and sincerity run from start to finish. The songs are sweet and playful without being cute or cloying and are more than worthy of repeated listens. –Jeff Proctor (myspace.com/antibubblesss)


ADAM’S DAGGER:
Self-titled: CD
Holy shit, guys. The ‘80s were thirty years ago! Can you believe that? Well, Adam’s Dagger can’t, because I’m not sure if they’ve ever heard a record released past 1984. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, though, because Adam’s Dagger is actually pretty decent. There are a few odd choices in song writing here and there, but this is not a bad record. I think when my biggest gripe about the release is the cover art (another The Black Album cover? Really?) then the band must be doing something right. –Bryan Static (Durty Mick, durtymickrecords.com)


ZYGOTEENS, THE / THE HUSSY:
Split: 7"
Zygoteens: distorted, crunched, punky power pop. Contains requisite hooks and some wailing guitar solos. The Hussy: male/female duo that cranks out the punky power pop as well, but with more of an arty-dancey-feel to it. All in all, two songs from two gnarly bands that sound good on the record, but probably sound a lot more fun live. –Daryl Gussin (Big Action)


YEAR OF THE PIG:
Self-titled: cd
Thinkin’ man’s metal, with sludgy geetars and songs about blind consumerism and media manipulation. The reimagining of the famous Iwo Jima flag-raising photo with an oil derrick replacing the flag that serves as this disc’s cover art is great. –Jim Ruland (Spider Cuddler)


XGIRLFRIEND EXPERIENCE, THE:
Crazymaker: CD
I picked up this album because of the title and its reference to the movie (non-porno) that Sasha Gray did. I was surprised to find out that women were behind such song titles as “Zombie Heart,” “Blood Bath,” and “Scream.” These songs seemed to be a move out of The Mapes’ playbook. It’s refreshing to know that women have a sense of humor dirtier than mine and just about as on par with The Mapes in terms of pushing the limits of decency. Take their tune “Pregnant Again” and its opening lyrics: “Oh no, I think I’m pregnant again. I really don’t want another abortion.” Musically, the best comparison I can make to a band other than The Mapes would be The Runaways. I don’t think the tunes on this album have the mass market, instant classic appeal that tunes like “Cherry Bomb” has, but not many songs do. These women are willing to take their sexuality where even Jett would fear to tread. The funniest song on the CD is “I’m a Slut.” It’s sort of like a Grease musical number, but replace the PG cast singing about an innocent high school fling with the women from The XGirlfriend Experience taking it to an X-rated sex-capade. I must lead a sheltered life because I don’t know women this brash, but, hey, at least I have the CD to prove they exist. –N.L. Dewart (Unrepentant)


WONDER YEARS, THE:
The Upsides: CD
The Wonder Years play a polished brand of pop punk that’s ridiculously melodic, smart and über-produced. The vocalist flawlessly hits all the high notes. To me, they sound like their buddies in Title Fight, or a way-wimpier version of Make Do And Mend. That’s the review. Now comes the diatribe. I really do hate to bust on a band in such detail but, goddamn, do these guys make it easy for me. I am tired to death of this myopic, self-obsessed, whoa-is-me brand of music. I understand the desire to write about what you know, guys, but haven’t we culturally moved past writing songs about our friends “sexting” girls when the van breaks down on tour? Or how the ex-girlfriend’s lame? Or how playingvideo games make you depressed? It’s obvious this band is smart and can play the fuck out of their instruments. But for all of the potential here, all they manage to do is namedrop their friends in songs and talk about how they’re trying to be happy even though it’s raining outside. Spare me. Overall, The Upsides is probably an awesome album for junior high kids who feel like walking down the hallway at school can be like running a gauntlet. The adults among us should most likely steer clear. It’s rare when a band’s collective pissing and moaning can upset me this much, but this is the third review of The Upsides that I’ve written and, believe it or not, the least vitriolic. I’m frustrated because I can see how this band could potentially be really great—but I feel like they repeatedly blow it by lyrically musing on their fucking haircuts for thirteen songs. –keith (No Sleep)


WHISKEY TRENCH:
Television: CD
I can’t help but think of Ringers when I listen to this. This is mainly because of the vocals, but the music contributes, too, to a large degree. Anyhow, Ringers aren’t a bad band at all to remind me of, but I’d rather just put on Detention Halls since that album is still as great as the day I got it—and I will, just as soon as Nathan gives me my copy back. –Vincent Battilana (Kiss Of Death)


WAYWARD, THE:
Alzheimers: 7"
I used to be an avid fan of a band called Carrion that was around until about 2003 and was always aware of the connection between them and the Wayward, but, for some reason, never really checked this band out. Years later, I’m finding out that I’ve been missing out and this 7” is great. It’s not quite as heavy as Carrion was, but the noodley, J Mascis-esque guitar work is still there. The riffs on the opening track are really bleak but actually pretty intricate. The vocals are spot-on; they’re pushed behind the mix but fit into everything well. The bass is a little hard to discern in the mix, but other than that, the production is solid. Both songs on the A side are great, and the B side is a sleepy cover of the Birthday Party song “The Friend Catcher.” –Ian Wise –Guest Contributor (Forcefield, forcefieldrecords.org)


VERMIN POETS, THE:
Self-titled: 7"
I can’t keep up, but I’m sure that I like everything Billy Childish puts out. After decades of great music and fronting numerous amazing bands like Thee Headcoats and Thee Milkshakes, he can still associate himself with solid songs and new bands every few years. In an online interview with Heyoka Magazine, Billy names poets as the worse vermin out there, even more despicable than “estate agents and dentists.” The V-Poets don’t go the way of Bo Diddley per past Childish bands but more of a 1970s punk rock sound; really catchy treble action, like that era’s cautious pop optimism. Billy is on bass guitar here with his wife Julie on drums, both backup singing, with Wolf Howard also on drums and Neil Palmer singing and playing guitar. Billy and Palmer write the songs—which don’t ring as bad poetry at all—but wise thoughts and giddy insight for all. It’s great stuff, really vibrant. Don’t think that you’ve heard it all from Billy and crew. –mike (SmartGuy, smartguyrecords.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Wrecktrospective, Twenty Years… and Counting: CD
Congrats on twenty years, Fat. They’ve become one of my favorite labels of the last few years with releases like Until We’re Dead, Oh Calcutta!, Potemkin City Limits, Cuban Ballerina,and the first Fat album I ever bought, SituationistComedy. The first disc is like a chronological greatest hits from a sizeable chunk of Fat’s bands. None of this disc is unreleased material, so it’s very likely that fans of any of these particular bands probably have these tracks already. There are a lot of goodies on here though, and it’s a good primer for people who may not know certain bands on the label. I learned, with the exceptions of Propagandhi and Swingin’ Utters, that I have very little interest in most of Fat’s pre-2000s catalog. Lagwagon and No Use For A Name just never really did it for me. Disc three is a compilation of the Fat Club single’s series. While I don’t own any of the actual singles, I’ve somehow come to own about half of these tracks over time on B-side comps. There were some things I didn’t have which were great to hear, like the Vandals and American Steel songs. Disc two is where the real rarities come to play. This is a compilation of demos from many Fat bands, new and old. While some of these songs are pretty close to what ended up on the final versions (seriously, what’s the difference between the demo and final version of Rise Against’s “Alive and Well”?), some have pretty entertaining quirks in their raw forms. Standouts include the Lagwagon song that has the super loud drum mix, Dead To Me’s “Writing Letters” with different lyrics, and Against Me’s “You Look Like I Need a Drink” rendered in acoustic form. Included with the set is a poster showing every Fat release up to the present. It’s pretty cool to see the label development in picture form. This is a pretty cool comp to pick up for the price. –Adrian (Fat)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Rodentagogue: The Best of Dark Roots Music II: CD: CD
This is a soundtrack for campfire suicides, lonely horseback rides, and loss. I don’t know what “dark roots music” is, but the bands on this collection fall into two groups. The first take the dustiest, dirtiest sounds of old-school country and do everything they can to add an impenetrable bleakness. They do not make music for sunny days. The second really need to stop listening to MurderBallads-eraNickCave for awhile. Luckily, bands that fall into the first group far outnumber those that fall into the second. Actually, I don’t know if that’s lucky at all. I think I have to turn this off because the sadness is fucking crushing me right now. –mp (Devil’s Ruin)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Our Boy Roy: LP
The Roy in the album title is Roy Orbison and this is an LP’s worth of cover tunes done by some of today’s most vaunted garage rockers. For those who don’t know Orbison’s music (and if you don’t, please explain exactly what planet have you been living on), he’s the guy who sang “Pretty Woman,” which Ty Segall gives an echoed, spooky treatment. It kind of works, but it’s tough to better such an iconic piece of musical Americana. What works incredibly well is the Jacuzzi Boys version of “You Got It,” taking a fairly straight forward tune and tweaking it with exuberant, psychedelic vocals and a perfectly executed fuzz guitar run. Other standout tracks come from the Camero Werewolf Band, Bloodshot Bill, Teenager, Red Mass, and Cheater Slicks, but you’ll have to pick this up, which you should do, to see what tunes they sing. –benke (Telephone Explosion)


VAPID:
Practically Dead: LP
A couple of years ago, I reviewed Vapid’s pretty good Do the Earthquake 7”, which was danceable riot grrl-sounding stuff. This LP, while it has some of the energy of that 7”, doesn’t have an LP’s worth of it. Some of the songs are kind of lulls. Though every song on here unquestionably comes from the same band (mostly courtesy of the vocalist), it kind of seems like Vapid doesn’t really filter out any of their material. There is probably enough good stuff here to fill out a 12”EP, but this just kinda lags as it is. –Vincent Battilana (Deranged, derangedrecords.com / Nominal, recordsnominal.com)


UTOPIA:
Niee: CD
Musically, they sound like your average modern punk band with all the requisite trappings. Lyrically, however, if the English-from-Polish translations are accurate, they’ve got a nice poetic streak going for them, with some introspection and intelligence in evidence. Can’t say they were the best thing I’ve heard all month, but what they turn in here is a respectable effort. –jimmy (Trujaca Fala, trujacafala.com)


TUBERS:
Anachronous: CD
I would—and indeed, will—call this angular, technical punk. Drive Like Jehu comes to mind. The songs, for the most part, are good but not quite balls-out frantic enough for my taste. What I actually like best on here are the slow instrumental songs. “Unmutual” and “40 XL” which are where the band lets songs breathe a little bit and, in the process, build tension that they aren’t quite hitting in their other songs. These quiet songs show the band approaching I Hate Myself territory, which being my favorite emo type band, is a really good thing. I’m on the cusp of saying these guys are doing really good on here, but what I really want is a little more push to both extremes of aggression and quiet restraint. If that happens, then I’ll say this band is in awesome land. –Adrian (No Idea)


TROUBLEMAKE / TURKISH TECHNO:
Split: 7”
Turkish Techno is neither of those things but a fun, punk anthem band, singing about cool girls that will give you something to live for while making you grow old every second—but they ain’t bitching about it! Good stuff. Troublemake is also a solid anathematic band, hailing from D.C., but making sounds in the Dillinger Four universe. This feels more produced than earlier songs—but with the strong, eager oomph they’ve always had—driving the songs with a spirit you can get on board with. This is the kind of stuff that makes house parties pop, getting everyone to sing and scream together. On their myspace page, main man Sam says he doesn’t want to sing and play bass, so they are looking for a singer or a bassist. I love that—no rock bullshit! Just energetic fun. Looks like they got a bassist so the peppy voice stays. –mike (Traffic Street, trafficstreetrecords.com)


THAT’S INCREDIBLE:
Self-titled: 7”
It’d be pretty hard for me not to like this record. I already love all of their previous/other bands, not limited to Toys That Kill, Dick Army/Four Deadly Questions, The Soviettes, and Killer Dreamer. I know people always say they hate it when reviews just list off other bands, but this is pretty much a sum of its parts —all of which are great on their own—and comes up with a whole new animal. I highly recommend this. –joe (It’s Alive)


TASER BREATH:
Self-titled: 7”
Whoa!—this is chaotic and a lot for the ears to digest, even in the span of one song—but I like it. There’s a strange containment to it all after the first several passes. Grindcore. Someone-lived-in-Tucson-at-one-time weirdness. Dirge. Amphetamine Reptile-style spent fuel and diesel exhaust rock. Samples. It’s like listening to The Locust, where twice as many notes are shoved into a limited space that it’s a bit much to cram in all at once. But once the ear holes get dilated, and you know that the roller coaster isn’t completely coming off the tracks—that it just hasn’t followed a regular maintenance schedule—a nice, punchy, jarring ride with moments of pure fright that you’re gonna die followed by snatches of pure freefall and pleasant instrumentals spins off the 7”. For the four of you this’ll make sense to, invert the awesome quirkiness of the Cuntifiers into a dark and bad-drug filled place. Rub some Anal Cunt into that… then that’s what Taser Breath starts to sound like. –todd (Goin’ Ape Shit)


SUSPECT PARTS:
Seventeen Television: 7”
Dudes from the Clorox Girls and the Briefs get together to create perfectly executed Buzzcocks-inspired ‘77 pop. A-side “Seventeen Television” reminds me a bit of the Buzzcocks tune, “Nostalgia,” which I suppose is an appropriate Buzzcocks song to remind one of when playing this style. B-side is more of the same with “Lesson,” followed up with the swinging psychedelic cover of Two Cheques’ “To Stone.” Three short and very sweet, enjoyable tunes here. –Jeff Proctor (Deranged)


SUSPECT PARTS:
Maneater: 7”
I’m a huge dork for The Briefs. I love their music and put an effort into getting into the guys’ side projects, such as Steve E. Nix and his various Leper outfits. So Suspect Parts, that has Chris Brief on drums, is no exception to this. In fact, their other 7”, Change Your Mind, by Suspect Parts was pretty good. This two track 7” just wasn’t as fun. The side-A track, “Man Eater,” has my lame brain conjuring up lines of cheesy Hall And Oates tunes, which I actually find more appealing than “Man Eater.” It’s an acoustic ballad that seems like it’s going for that ‘60s rock feel but the vocals sound annoyingly out of key. Side B actually dons a decent cover of Modern Lovers’ song, “She’s Cracked.” The only problem is the tune sort of reminds me of a down tempo-ed Briefs song, which only makes me wish I were listening to The Briefs. –N.L. Dewart (Taken By Surprise)


SUPERIOR UNITS:
Take Her in the Classroom: 7”
Three songs of snotty high school punk (Plastic Idol’s website says they really are teens?!), with a confused feeling that’s really fun and loopy. Are they learning how to play? Drunk? Scotch tape holding instruments together? Ah, who cares? It’s the youthful energy and dirty fuzz that sounds great. Sort of joke lyrics, although “2 Many Dipshitz (in my town)” is as realistic as it gets. It’ll grow on you like puberty. –mike (Plastic Idol)


STUN GUNS:
And There Was Nothing We Could Do about It…: LP
Coincidentally, I picked this up right after watching the documentary, Cocaine Cowboys, and it definitely helped set the scene. The Stun Guns were Miami’s favorite fuck ups circa ‘95/’96. Like if Radon had been transported to the urban corruption and cultural clashes of Miami all the while retaining their light-hearted, witty, numb-nut spirit. Any fan of bands like Onion Flavored Rings, Hidden Spots, Future Virgins, and the Beltones should consider this re-issue a mandatory history lesson. –Daryl Gussin (Do You Hear We?)


SPOOKS:
Death from beyond the Grave: LP
Quite a bizarre album here from these Atlanta garage punks, featuring member(s) of the Black Lips and others, somewhere between a Halloween sound effects album and synth punk a la the Screamers, Los Reactors, and the Spits. Some of it is really terrific and engaging, and some of it is really unlistenable. Either way, the fellas seem to be having a fantastic amount of fun with the material and I imagine something like this is better meant to be experienced live. Overall, I think this should have been condensed into a 10” or 7” even, as this is met equally with great enjoyment and great disappointment. Comes on clear vinyl with a pair of 3-D glasses. –Jeff Proctor (Die Slaughterhaus)


SPENCEY DUDE & THE DOODLES:
Self-titled: 7”
Hell yeah, there’s some zany songs here but it was all I could do to keep from just moving the needle back to the tune “Girl Crazy” over and over again. The ending of said tune goes, “You’re girl crazy” and then some funny voice says, “hit the clinic.” It’s definitely a must-hear track. For a song that’s about a minute and a half long, it had me smiling twice as long after I listened to it. This entire 7” is just one concept album of love songs that seem transported straight from the ‘60s. Spencey Dude & The Doodles sound a lot like The Troggs with every thing from their production aesthetics, reverb, and harmonies. “Flirting,” is about a man who gave his girl a quarter to stay in the bar and play the jukebox instead of going out and flirting with the guys. Annamal Doodle’s female back up vocals really add a nice touch. This is just one fun and funny EP here. –N.L. Dewart (Rob’s House, robshouserecords.com)


SNARLAS:
Self-titled: 7”
When I received this record in the mail to review, I was really excited since I knew that it was the band that Cindy Crabb ofDoriszine and her sister were doing. However, in spite of my excitement, I ended up shelving it for a while. Why? Because I didn’t want to be disappointed. Just because someone can write a great zine doesn’t mean that everything they do is going to be great. However, when I did get around to playing it, I found that my reservations were ridiculous. It’s a great record. It’s dirty three-chord punk with shouted dual female vocals. A raw, urgent, beautiful mess. The subject matter of the songs has a lot of the same themes you’ll find in Doris zine: songs about respecting past revolutionary struggles and some about self-preservation and empowerment. A lot of the songs also deal with living through trauma and abuse. For instance, the song “Generation 5,” seems to be in the voices of both an older and younger sibling as they try to heal from sexual abuse from their childhood as adults: “tell me, tell me / we can trust each other now / there were nights I knew nothing about / I couldn’t protect you like no one protected me.” The song “The Things That You Fear Are the Things That Will Save You” is an anthem about not listening to what we’ve been taught to fear by society and our upbringings and how wonderful and full that can make our lives. What more could you ask for in a punk record? It’s heavy, powerful, gutsy stuff. –Craven (Snarlas / Plan-It-X Records South)


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·CASPIAN
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·LOVE ME DESTROYER


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