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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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KITCHEN’S FLOOR:
Battle of Brisbane: LP
An Aussie band stripping things to the bare minimum structure-wise, at times going the dirge-punk route a la Flipper with clean channel guitars, and at other times flirting with a woozy, almost psychedelic shoegaze hybrid sound. Then just when you think you have ‘em pegged, they break out the acoustic guitars. I’ve said it before: dunno what the fuck it is about Australia as a country, but the bands that come out of that part of the world have an uncanny knack of making the most musically with very little, and this is no exception. –Jimmy Alvarado (HoZac, hozacrecords.com)


KLAM:
The Concrete Vagina: CS
Shoegaze meets post-punk in this spacey, reverb-drenched daydream of an EP. Heavy on the lo-fi ‘80s key effects and doom-laden minor chords, The Concrete Vagina offers plenty of pleasant, yet unimaginative doses of droning nostalgia in its five original A side songs. Fittingly, the triteness continues on side B with six syrupy, saccharine cover songs. Mimicry is the best form of flattery, but if Klam can break free of their idols’ influence and focus more on honing a sound of their own, their next EP will be something worth purchasing. –Simone Carter (Land Animal Tapes, landanimaltapes.bandcamp.com)


KMART:
Krauthouse: CS
This is a cassette of psychy noise jams. It packs a solid hour of meandering guitar-driven tracks that remind me of a looser Dinosaur Jr. or a more distorted Guided By Voices, only the tracks are five or six minutes long and sparing vocals (they’re screamed and unintelligible if they appear at all). Easy-listening noise, perhaps. I would certainly smoke weed to this. –Lyle (Self-released, kmart.bandcamp.com)


KNEST:
Honorary Bachelors of Arts: CD
Dissonant and minimal, each completely improvised song of Knest’s debut album perfectly leads into the next. Honorary Bachelors of Arts was recorded in (what must have been) one incredibly exhausting day, and the fourteen free-form jazz-inspired tracks take you on a journey through a dense and treacherous sonic forest. Impressively, Knest is comprised of only three members. Piano, saxophone, guitar, cello, vibraphone, and marimba make up just a few of the fourteen instruments used to build their eerie, shadowy tone. At times veering toward the modern and groovy, like current reigning jazz lords BadBadNotGood and The Bad Plus, and at other times reminiscent of Jonny Greenwood’s cinematic solo work, Knest has a scarily keen knack for composition –Simone Carter (Self Sabotage, knest.bandcamp.com)


KREUTZER SONATA, THE:
Fight Songs: 7"
Melodic hardcore, the modern way. The songs are to the point—with the occasional breakdown—and carry enough force to keep you into them. Solid tracks with distorted guitars, paired with hard backing vocals. Fans of tough-sounding skate rock will dig it. –Steve Adamyk (nothingnewrecords.com)


LACHANCE:
Sunrise: CDEP
Initially, I was sitting on the fence with this. Although I enjoyed the music, which had a bouncy quality akin to The Movielife, I was struggling to accept the vocals. I know punk rock doesn’t need to be perfect but at times they struggled to hold a tune and this grated with me somewhat. However, after repeated plays I warmed to them, especially the slightly out of time dual vocals which managed to give the tracks a more engaging feel than if there had just been one singer. It actually adds a sense of camaraderie to the songs, so I was pleased to have persevered. –Rich Cocksedge (Make-That-A-Take, makethatatakerecords.com)


LASH OUTS, THE:
State of Excess: CD
The good points are that the singer has an Elvis Costello-ish voice and the music is upbeat. However, I feel the instrumental, “Bowels of Time (First Movement),” was drawn out and sounds like pieces of all of the other songs on the CD smashed together. About half the album feels too much like complaining. I mean, yeah complain about shit that bugs you, sure. But this feels like they’re trying to spoon feed me a big bowl of mushy, overly-long complaints. Not my cup of tea. –Becky Rodriguez (Clam Jam, thelashouts.bandcamp.com)


LAST CHAOS:
Only Fit for Ghosts: LP
Blown-out, reverb-drenched, gloriously sloppy hardcore straight outta Brisbane. A Discharge influence is present, but the band is so spazzed out, odds are you won’t really notice unless yer paying attention. Tempos range from mid-gear to gallop, but man, what a racket they make. –Jimmy Alvarado (SPHC, sphcrecords.bandcamp.com)


LAST KILLERS, THE:
Wolf Inside!: LP
There’s nothing terribly original about these Italians (sorry, was that redundant?) —even their Odd Rod/Big Daddy Roth-style album cover evokes more nostalgia for similar covers from the ‘90s than the original source material from the ‘60s— other than the amazing lightning swiftness with which they mix, scramble, and detour their bountiful gunny sack of garage rock’n’roll clichés. One second it’s like, “Yeah, it sounds like the Nomads, I heard this all a million times before,” five seconds later it’s, “Yeah, it sounds like the Devil Dogs, I heard this all a million times before,” five seconds after that it’s, “Yeah, it sounds like Les Sexareenos, I heard this all a million times before,” five seconds after that it’s, “Yeah, it sounds like Billy Preston, I—wait, what now?” These guys whiz back and forth between source material swipes so adeptly and innovatively that their lack of invention is essentially a non-factor. Get the stick out of your ass and go have some fun. BEST SONG: “Tally Ho.” Who the hell are The Clean? BEST SONG TITLE: “Tally Ho.” Who the hell are The Clean? FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Among the miscellaneous samples between tracks: The count-in to 20/20’s “Yellow Pills.” –Rev. Norb (Go Down, godownrecords.com)


LAURICE:
G.A.Y.D.A.R.: LP/CD
The back cover of the LP states that Laurice is a pioneer of gay activism and music, and that this LP “is totally gay from the first track to the last.” I can’t speak to Laurice’s status as a pioneer (though have no reason to doubt it), but I can attest that this is record is gay from beginning to end. Every song has a strong male-on-male sex theme, tackling topics such as large wieners likely to destroy assholes, fisting, future oral sexcapades with current lovers, lost love, and more. The music is electronic and dance-y, falling somewhere between a minimalistic Helen Love and a minimalistic Divine. With multiple listens, the record gets kind of catchy, in part because of Laurice’s vocals attempting to match the music. However, overall, the record is a bit too minimalistic, as it falls short of hitting the level of catchiness of the two previously mentioned artists, or the level of intrigue that Suicide managed to pull off. Still may be worth checking out if any of this sounds appealing to you. My copy came with a page torn out from a male nudie mag (with full nudity, but of only one dude) and promo photo of a (younger) Laurice. –Vincent Battilana (Mighty Mouth)


LENGUAS LARGAS:
Abba Daddy: LP
Tucson’s legendary Lenguas Largas back at it again with their follow up to 2014’s critically acclaimed Come On In. Traversing musical influences into a complex web of sounds is what the group has become known for—while defying genre classification and definition, even in the minds of the group themselves. So although it’s easy to describe them as an “indie-psych-soul-garage” band, it’s nearly impossible to find just one song that encapsulates the band’s sound as just that. That being said, this is perhaps the first Lenguas record that I have listened to that has a much more straight-forward approach to accessible songwriting without diluting any of the layers upon layers of musical influence. And yet it’s puzzling why these guys aren’t featured on any hip web-only music blogs or magazines which claim to support the alternative. Be that as it may, I’ll continue to support the Lenguas whether they’re playing a dank bar show surrounded by friends or opening up for a better known (but usually not better) band. –Juan Espinosa (Red Lounge)


LES SUZARDS:
Self-titled: LP
Les Suzards, from France, apes The Damned and Testors. The rock’n’roll guitar licks are warm and the hooks are nearly sharp enough to sink in, but as it is, there’s nothing here that isn’t best heard on a Sonny Vincent record. –Sean Arenas (Wanda, mailorder.wandarecords.de)


LIPPIES, THE:
Self-titled: CD
I couldn’t help but think that The Lippies is comprised of band nerds. They are super precise, don’t skip a beat, the vocals are incredibly skilled, and it’s completely by the playbook. Pop punk melodies are trite with cheap frills and slick riffs. Jagged edges? Please, just one? I was bored. Plus, with songs like “Friend Zone,” “Fuck the Customer,” and “Basic Boy,” I was thinking that these must be young people problems. But really, I wanted to like this. There’s a menstrual cup that is gushing and overflowing on the back cover... unfortunately, The Lippies don’t deliver any blood, guts, or glory. –Camylle Reynolds (Red Scare, redscare.net)


LOCK:
The Cycle: 7" EP
Straight-ahead, gruff-vocaled hardcore—zippy beats, muscular delivery, and requisite Negative Approach influence not too far under the surface. At certain points it was kinda fun to pretend the singer was a pro wrestler delivering a withering rant about some faceless nemesis. Not intended as a dis, merely an admission that sometimes shit like that happens. –Jimmy Alvarado (Iron Lung)


MAD DOCTORS / SUN VOYAGER:
Split: 7"
Brooklyn’s Mad Doctors join forces with fellow Brooklynites Sun Voyager for this split single. Mad Doctors craft a blend of punk’n’roll with a hint of surf on the A Side track “Rusty Knife.” There should be a warning label that you must like reverb to listen to this, because if you don’t, this song will surely cut your eardrums until they bleed. If you’re like me and love jangly guitars, then you’ll be sure to check up on whatever experiments the Mad Doctors unleash next. I wasn’t as much of a fan of Sun Voyager on first listen. The more I listened to it, the more it grew on me, to the point that I think I prefer Sun Voyager over Mad Doctors. While “GhostValley,” starts out a bit slow, when it crashes into full gear, it’s quite a psyched-out burner. The Mad Doctors track was good for what it was, but didn’t hold up as well after repeated listens. –Paul J. Comeau (King Pizza, kingpizzarecords.bandcamp.com)


MADE IN JAPAN:
Instant Hit: 7"
Power pop from ‘79 and ‘80. The music is really cool. The lyrics stress how good excess is. A lot of things in the early ‘80s were like that. Money! More, more, more! This band had a scene in a b-movie, New Year’s Evil, but these songs weren’t in the movie. The music’s good but I feel like I’m listening to an advertisement. I do like it, but this is something that I need to be in the mood to listen to. –Becky Rodriguez (HoZac, hozacrecords@gmail.com, hozacrecords.com)


MANDATES:
In the Back of Your Hearts: CS
Sometimes the distinction between what makes a record click and not click are dubious and fleeting. For the life of me I couldn’t tell you why this record doesn’t work for me. It’s got all the elements of stuff I like, but it shoots through my ears at lightning speed and disappears before I give it a second thought. This is a record of slick but sloppy power pop on the verge of ‘77 punk revivalism. It’s close to other Canadian power pop darlings like the Steve Adamyk Band or Mother’s Children. There’s nothing inherently wrong with the record, but it doesn’t inspire me to engage other people with it. If you have a desire of steady beats and slick chorus/verse hand offs, you have much worse options. –Bryan Static (Shake!, experienceshake.com / Teenage Rampage, teenagerampagerecords.com)


MANIAC:
Midnight Kino: 7"
Maniac are back with another two-song blaster, and on my favorite record label no less! They may be based in Los Angeles, but there is no denying that Maniac is a Pacific Northwest band at their heart. In the post-grunge world, the Pacific Northwest (or Pacific Southwest to me, since I am just above the border) has made a name for itself for amazing, snotty punk rock that gets you moving. From The Briefs and Exploding Hearts, to The Girls and Clorox Girls (both of whom have members now in Maniac), there is a steady stream of killer bands cutting a swath or radness through the rainforest… And yeah, Maniac is a part of that even though they live way the hell down the I-5. Anyways, they are continuing on with the sound that made their debut LP Demimonde one of the best albums of 2015. It is frustrating to no end that years go by between releases on Modern Action, but they can be somewhat forgiven when they jump back in with a Maniac single. Do what you have to in order to get a copy of this. Sell an organ. It will be worth it. –Ty Stranglehold (Modern Action)


MAX LEVINE ENSEMBLE, THE:
Backlash, Baby: LP
I’d seen The Max Levine Ensemble’s name around for seemingly forever, but I have no recollection of ever knowingly listening to them. I had associated the band with Plan-It-X and thought they would be folky pop punk. Well, now I feel as though I’ve maligned The MLE. Within moments of the record’s start, they hit on the Ergs side of pop punk the spectrum, and definitely call to mind the Ergs themselves. Although the band contends they’re biting Paul Simon and Pixies, I still hear Ergs. That said, you’d be hard up to find your typical (or atypical) pop punk songs about girls and love herein. Rather, the lyrics are contemplative, tending to reflect on the inner turmoil that occurs when trying to find a fair way to live in the exterior political and social climate. For sure, positive vibes throughout, despite the struggle presented. Maybe it’s just because I got something I didn’t expect here, but I found Backlash, Baby to be a refreshing take on the genre (save for the upstrokes on “Shadow of Death”). The record also features guest appearances by Jeff Rosenstock and Sheena Ozella. Mine is on pinkish-purple colored vinyl. There’s probably a color that more accurately describes the vinyl’s appearance, but I don’t work for Pantone, so I ain’t knowin’ stuff like that. –Vincent Battilana (Rumbletowne / lameorecords.limitedrun.com)


MDC:
Elvis in the Rhineland–Live in Berlin: LP
If you think you can’t be bored by a band called Millions Of Dead Cops singing “John Wayne Was a Nazi” to actual Germans a year before the Berlin Wall came down then, sure, you can think that. Maybe it’s the late ‘80s power snare/crossover sheen that I can’t hang with. At one point Dave Dictor says, “A lot of smart people try to tell you there’s not enough food in the world and I think they’re chock full of shit,” and the audience has no reaction to that, then MDC plays “Chock Full of Shit.” Was this an issue in 1988? One side said we need more food and the other side says no, we have plenty? Many years later this moment is remastered and pressed onto very nice red vinyl, along with about five hundred riffs and one cover of “Jailhouse Rock” with the chorus changed to “Dead Cops Rock.” Scandalous. –Matt Werts (Beer City, beercity.com)


MDC:
Hey Cop! If I Had a Face Like Yours and Shades of Brown: LP
Fully admit I didn’t keep up with MDC from tail end of the ‘80s through the ‘90s, largely ‘cause I found myself focusing more on the local underground music scene than the greater punk scene during that period, so there’s a chunk of their discography between This Blood’s for You and Magnus Dominus Corpus that is wholly new to me, including the two albums under discussion here. Hey Cop…, their fifth album, sees them frequently ratcheting back from the wild tempo, free-jazz-inflected thrash that quickly became their trademark in band’s early years. The lyrics remained topical as ever—”Millions Of Dead Cops” even references the then-recent killing of Circle One vocalist John Macias by the Santa Monica Police, as well as inflected with doses of sly humor. The song structures themselves are still fairly complex, and blasts of speed still pop up throughout. But you also get a song like “Black Christmas,” which sounds like a (Canadian) Subhumans outtake, and the downright anthemic “Moneypile” mixed in with ragers like “Crime of Rape” and “To Gig and Die in L.A.” Shades of Brown, their sixth album, continues along the same lines, with consistently stronger songwriting in evidence and a bit more eclecticism in delivery. Production is spot on and I’d venture to say it’s now my second favorite MDC album, after their debut. Based on both these releases, it’s pretty clear they were still on point long after hardcore’s supposed “salad days.” Kudos and thanks to BeerCity for getting these out to the masses once again. –Jimmy Alvarado (Beer City)


MDC:
Millions of Damn Christians: LP
Yet another crucial BeerCity re-issue of a bygone classic. Listen, do I need every MDC LP from the last thirty years? No. Do I need to go see the scab MDC play in Oakland in 2016? No. Am I happy that one of the more crucial political hardcore bands of the last thirty years is still active and still playing parties and backyards? Yes. This LP is their third and the last I actively listened to. It fully holds up some twenty-eight years later—fierce, breakneck hardcore chock full of anti-religious, anti-state, and anti-police rhetoric—definite stable mates to the Dead Kennedys et al of the day. Back in the late ‘80s, I had Millions Of Dead Cops on the back of my studded jacket in rural England and that caused a stir. Imagine that shit in Reagan-eraAmerica?! Yikes (the track “Bye Bye Ronnie” is a personal fave). Along with the recent reissues of their first LP and the Smoke Signals LP, this is a crucial addition to your collection if you aren’t old as fuck and bought it back in the day like me. Must have. –Tim Brooks (Beer City, beercity.com)


MEAN JEANS:
“Night Vision” b/w “Now I Wanna Be Yr Dogg,” “69 Tears”: 7"
Said it before and I’ll say it again, while not completely derivative of the Ramones, Mean Jeans are the band that I think Joey and the gang would be playing in if they were still around today. These three tracks are the precursor to their first Fat full length, Tight New Dimension(full disclosure, I did just interview them about this for New Noise magazine). This band out of Portland, Ore. has never operated in an expected fashion, and their signing to Fat came about with just a simple email to the label. This carries through to the packaging, which is only a 7”, small lyric sheet, and a cardboard sleeve. All the rest of the effort is shoved into the grooves of this record. “Now I Wanna Be Yr Dogg” is one of the two exclusive tracks, and while the title is reminiscent of The Stooges, that’s the only thing the two have in common. It’s a speedy, power pop anthem with backing vocals and an undulating cadence, sprinkled with a sweet solo in the middle. Every song is emblematic of being young, eating pizza, drinking, and pogoing. A surefire dance record. –Kayla Greet (Fat Wreck)


MEAN JEANS:
Tight New Dimension: CD
I have loved Mean Jeans since the first time I heard them. They’ve always taken that irreverent, have fun at all costs attitude to the next level. I like stupid fun, because I am a stupid fun kind of guy. Every time I hear they’re putting out a new album, I get excited. This was no exception. I will admit I was a little shocked at how clean the production is. That quickly wore off when I realized that the Jeans are as hopped up on goofballs as they ever were. They just seem to have spent a little more time in the studio. No matter what, the end result is the same. Tight New Dimension is a Friday afternoon of a long weekend kind of album. You’ll be jumping up and down with a grin splitting your face and not a care in the world for at least two days. This is Mean Jeans’ End of the Century. –Ty Stranglehold (Fat)


MEAN JEANS:
Tight New Dimension: LP/CD
I imagine that hell would have to freeze over before Mean Jeans moved away from the heavy Ramones influence that forms the basis for about ninety-nine percent of its sound. However, as there is still a fire burning deep below our feet, Tight New Dimension doesn’t stray from the well-applied formula the band has successfully employed for some time now. Songs remain humorous, riffs still drive the record along, and simple solos continue to be liberally spread across the album. This is the definition of good fun. –Rich Cocksedge (Fat Wreck, mailbag@fatwreck.com, fatwreck.com)


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