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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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CHAINSAW TO THE FACE:
Self-titled: 7"
Nineteen songs on a 7”? What da? Easy listening is definitely not going to happen here. A blur of start and stops that makes it hard to figure out the song separations if you don’t pay attention. Ugliness played at slow speeds and then pushed to their max abilities in speed. Music that is played so aggressively that I imagine the guitar and bass player’s fingers have calluses that are super thick but still bleed from playing a set. Their drummer, caffeinated to the point of heart failure, unleashes beats at a breakneck pace. I imagine a vocalist who can no longer speak due to the harsh torment his vocal chords receive from the all the guttural yelling. If you want happy, get Abba’s Greatest Hits. Looking for something downright ugly and brutal? This is a good place as any. –don (Cowabunga)


CATBURGLARS, THE:
Self-titled: CD
Looks kinda alterna, but it’s actually quite punk. Things like “I Wanna Be John Goodman” and “She Came From The Internet” remind me ((spiritually, if nothing else)) of a fuzzier, meaner, medium-fi-er version of “We Have Come For Your Beer” by the Fiends ((minus the hits)), but the less topical “Mad” and “Judy Is a Bartender” seem more like the songs Dee Dee wrote for “Halfway to Sanity” or something. “Smoking Is Popular” might almost sound like a retarded TSOL. I find myself checking my watch periodically during any song that extends past the 1:59 mark; luckily, that only happens four times. Pretty dumb Runaways cover. Eleven songs in twenty minutes. Pretty genius Runaways cover. I like Old Style™. BEST SONG: “Mad” BEST SONG TITLE: “Judy Is A Bartender” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: The songs “Cherrybomb” ((sic)) and “Sex Tapes” are juxtaposed on the back cover track listing, and mislabeled in the CD’s tracking info as well. Further, “Cherry Bomb” is two words. –norb (Criminal IQ)


CATBURGLARS, THE: Self-titled: CD:
Self-titled: CD
Full-length of clever-guy, sorry-I-like-acting-stupid, hardcore punk. Every punk band is influenced by Black Flag. It’s something that doesn’t even need to be stated anymore. But not every punk band is influenced by “TV Party.” Whether The Catburglars are covering “Cherrybomb,” singing about John Goodman, or just showing their untainted love for The Ramones, Black Flag, or M.O.T.O, they do it with a sense of humor and a highly contagious and sincere air of nonchalant stupidity. –Daryl Gussin (Criminal IQ)


CADDY:
Electric Hero: CD
This sounds like something I would’ve stumbled upon in high school. It’s general pop punk that’s pretty slick. The art and layout of the whole thing is pretty nice. It reminds me of something that would be on Kung Fu Records back in the late ‘90s or early ‘00s, like just-pre-majors Ataris. Or for that matter, at times they remind me of Bracket. While some songs do run a little long, though there are a few moments where they break out the glockenspiel or synth that aren’t too bad. –joe (Diner Junkie)


BURNING HEADS / ADOLESCENTS:
Split: 12” EP
Burning Heads: One thrasher and one burner, both quite catchy, and an interesting, almost poppy take of the Adolescents’ “No Way.” Adolescents: Two new tunes, both along the same lines as the stuff on their last full-length, OC Confidential, and a cover of a tune by—you guessed it—Burning Heads. If the newer tunes are any indication of what their next album is going to sound like, they may well have another doozy of a disc on their hands. Kudos to both bands on some fine work put in here. –jimmy (Slow Death)


BUGGIRL:
Dirt in the Skirt: CD
Female-fronted rock duo in the vein of ‘70s classic rock. Okay at first, but the Bellrays do it so much better. I give this a “meh.” –thiringer (Impendence)


BUCK BROTHERS:
We Are Merely Filters: CD
The latest corporate darlings garnering fame with a bonafide Guinness World Record entry and parlaying it into yet another album of safe, quasi-punk blandness. –jimmy (Static)


BROADCAST ZERO:
Some Concerns Regarding This Revolt: CD
As with their preceding album, I’m having a bit of trouble reconciling the fact that while I like the fact they express their positions intelligently, I’m not too hip on their rigid adherence to the “melodic street punk by numbers” template. When I read the lyric sheet—usually the kiss of death for most modern bands pandering to this genre—I’m thinkin’, “They’ve put some thoughts into getting their point across,” but when I listen to the music, I’m thinkin’ “Wow, mix ‘n’ match punk.” I respect ‘em, and I really wanna like ‘em, but I’m having helluva time with the latter. –jimmy (stumblerecords.com)


BREATHING LIGHT, THE:
Self-titled: CD
I don’t know shit about recording music, but even I could figure out how to get songs at the correct levels. Not The Breathing Light. One song is loud, the other soft. The next one is loud and so on. It’s as though no one mastered this album (which may not be too far from the truth). That being said, I actually liked some of the music on here. It had some cheap-sounding guitars that still proved effective and vocals that, at times, reminded me of the band Egon from El Paso, Texas. The noisy, dirty sound says it’s in the garage punk camp, but the recording makes it hard to tell. At least it shows potential. I’d be interested in hearing more if it was recorded properly. –kurt (thebreathinglight.tumblr.com)


BRAIN CAR:
Rock & Roll Bologna: 7” EP
Snotty punk ranting and railing against suburbia, Baghdad, spiders, and conforming to rules. They’ve got a definite ‘80s feel to ‘em, and they can generate some interesting tuneage to match the obnoxiousness quite nicely. Good stuff. –jimmy (Reel Time)


BODIES, THE: Angel on the Nine: 7” single:
Angel on the Nine: 7” single
Had no idea this band was still functioning. The last time I had seen them was at Headline Records with the Trust Fund Babies around 1998/1999. Two new songs of punk rock that reminds me of a rawer Stitches. Despite being from Sonoma, I hear a big OrangeCounty influence in their sound. It’s tuneful, catchy, fast, and clean. “Open Your Eyes” is the faster of the two, and the one I listen to the most. “Angel on the Nine” is a bit more poppier, and, in a way, it holds the song back. Not a bad song, but when paired with what’s on the B side, it doesn’t have as much heat. –Matt Average ((Modern Action)


BOATS!:
Totally Jawsome: LP
Sounds like a mashup of the Clorox Girls, who are boys, and the Busy Signals, who are partially girls, high on some type of mild crack made from Buzzcocks b-sides, because they secretly get off on the minor chords more than the major fifths and harmonies. I don’t know that any one song of the dozen here is exceptional, but these guys are definitely better than other bands who sound like a mashup of those bands getting high on those b-sides, so good on ‘em. I think they’re the only band on MySpace™ these days, so, obviously, their superstardom is all but assured. BEST SONG: “A Why” BEST SONG TITLE: “Porno?” “Oprah?” I’m dyin’ here! FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: If you think about it, the record cover looks kinda like the flag of Finland. –norb (May Cause Dizziness)


BRAIN BANGER:
Munsoned: CD
Churning, grinding guitars, relatively restrained vocals, mostly slow to mid-tempo rhythms, and an overall sound that falls somewhere between fringier metal, alt-rock, and punk. –jimmy (no address listed)


BLOODTYPE:
Self-titled: EP
Let’s cut to the chase, this record is fuggin’ awesome: blazing hardcore punk that’s fast, chaotic and pissed off. You have to hear “Dropout.” It starts off sounding like it’s going to be the usual stuff, then suddenly they kick it into high gear and dive straight into some raging thrash, which tears into “Not Here to Make Friends” that, somewhere in the middle, finally shifts back down for a couple seconds to let you catch your breath. All five songs rip, and yet it never gets redundant. They throw in time changes, some stop-go parts, and the delivery is from the heart. The singer sounds like a rabid dog going berserk. As I said in the beginning, this is fuggin’ awesome! Definitely in my top ten of 2010. –Matt Average (Cowabunga)


BLACK TRIANGLES:
Mannequin EP: 7”
This 7” is fucking great. Hardcore punk as it should be brought. Beautiful throw back reminiscent of Reagan Youth and Demon System 13 that’s good and done that well. I was so very close to seeing these guys play a full set before it all fell apart. After hearing this, I’m bummed for the living room circle pit that could have been. –Rene Navarro (Stress Domain)


BLACK TIME:
More Songs about Motorcycles and Death: EP
Three strong records on In The Red, a slew of releases on various labels, a split LP with Ty Segall, and now Black Time’s back with a new one on Wrench Records out of London. As the title suggests, this six-song EP’s theme is built around motorcycles and doom. Like the bass lines on a late ‘50s rockabilly 45, lead singer/guitarist Lemmy Caution’s vocals occasionally lack definition because they’re so visceral. On other numbers, he comes through loud and clear, like on the group’s cover of Serge Gainsbourg’s (with Brigitte Bardot) “Harley Davidson,” completely refashioned in the Black Time mold. Musically, this is the Black Time you hopefully know and love—Crime-style distortion coupled with Ventures-inspired guitar leads and primal drumming. The originals are compelling enough, but it’s the Gainsbourg cover that’s hitting me. Reason is simple enough: it’s the coupling of Lemmy with female backing vocalists. Caution used to do this with Janie Too Bad; this go around it’s with Cecile and Vinciane. Two extremes at once really add stability to my life, whether it’s the Reid brothers singing over pure noise or Syd Barrett spouting madness over sparse acoustic recordings. Like Ritalin or coffee, peace of mind comes with overstimulation and Black Time plays with extremes very well. (The opposite is also true—listen to “Porpoise Song” by the Monkees eight times in a row, a beautiful Goffin-King composition.) This album is an absolute burner and should be listened to over and over again, preferably in the morning with a large cup of coffee and sunglasses on. (Note to Monsieur Caution: Where’s your cover of “Yum Yum Yamaha” by Carol Connors? Maybe next time…) –ryan (Wrench)


BIG BLACK CLOUD:
Dark Age: LP
It’s good to know that there are new bands coming out that defy easy pigeonholing. Big Black Cloud has a sound that is all over the place, and where other bands attempting the same would fail, these guys pull it off with class. A mix of psychedelia, post punk, weirdo rock, noise, no wave, and lost creature feature soundtracks. The sound is dark, drenched in noise and distortion, with some chaos bubbling up. How they manage it all is a mystery. I’m pulled into the maelstrom by the bass playing, which keeps it simple but is incredibly effective, proof that you don’t need to be a noodley bass player to be a great bass player. You just have to know how much to play. Less is more. Then, as the bass leads me along, I notice there’s an organ in the sound that gives everything a certain air of creepiness (a good creepy—there is such a thing!) and an indicator that there’s more going on than initial glances reveal. Guitars ring out and sound like air raid warnings at times, then they jab like knives in the dark, the drums smash and careen, and the singer sounds like he’s losing control. The lyrics are no slouch either. In fact, they’re some of the most interesting I’ve heard in some time. The song titles would make you think these songs are just some sassy shit. However, the words are poetic and not so clear cut, but not opaque either. Check out “Fancy Fux” or “Vulcan Rock” with the lines, “In this dark age of men in caves/ The years come and change, but life stays the same.” Or “Time to Waste” brought on by the despair that the season fall brings. Really, just check them all out. Musically, “Huff Party #9” is a standout track. It consists of a guitar-clanging riff that repeats over a equally repetitive and effective bass line. Amid all this are washes of noise, a trumpet that comes out of nowhere, makes some blurts, then goes away as fast as it came. Really good stuff here. –Matt Average (Stankhouse)


BIRD’S MILE HOME:
Self-titled: LP
I have never really delved into alt-country. I’ve dipped my toe; I enjoy some of the well-known stuff, like Uncle Tupelo’s No Depression and Ryan Adams’s Heartbeaker and most Wilco. Whenever I hear any alt-country, I pretty much want to listen to one of the above-mentioned bands—even when it’s something I’m mildly interested in like Lucero. Maybe one day when I feel like listening to this type of thing and Uncle Tupelo and the others I have in reserve just ain’t cutting it, then maybe I’ll venture the way of Bird’s Mile Home. Until then, BMH is just gonna make me put on “Graveyard Shift.” –Vincent Battilana (Minor Bird)


BE MY DOPPLEGANGER:
No Composure: CD
Guys who are not skinny should not take their shirts off on stage. I forgot to tell the bassist of Scouts Honor in my other review the same thing. I’m not letting these dudes off the hook, but I like this CD a lot better so I will move on. I dug their first record, but I think they went for the jugular here and the end result is blood all over the place. But nobody seems to be any worse for wear here. “Turning Seventeen” is a great tune that will bring you back to those wistful years—unless you are there now, then I don’t know what it will do to you. But turn it up and find out. “Maybe It Was Your Fault” is also a cool singalong. There’s an assload of good songs here, so buy this and choose your poison. Yum. –koepenick (It’s Alive)


AZTLAN UNDERGROUND:
Self-titled: CD
For much of its twenty-plus years of existence, Aztlan Underground has made a point of wreaking havoc on the sensibilities of those who prefer their music to fit into clearly outlined cubbyholes. Over the years, they’ve managed to dip their toes into virtually every pond there is to do so—how many bands can you name off the top of your head that would fit perfectly on a bill with Slayer, Public Enemy, John Zorn, Crass, Rage Against the Machine, Swans, and the meanest hardcore band you can think of without anyone blinking an eye?—and this latest only reinforces their standing as one of the most challenging, creative, and unique bands to grace Los Angeles’ underground. Each song here is not so much music as an aural landscape ravaged by tsunami-sized waves of sonic virulence, with quieter passages only serving as a brief respite before the next surge comes crashing down. Within each, one can find indigenous music, hip hop, jazz, hardcore punk, spoken word, metal, electronica, you name it, mixed into a heady mélange and married to lyrics addressing the protection of the earth and indigenous cultures, and ensuring the disastrous mistakes United States government continues to repeatedly make and the resulting atrocities are not so easily hidden away by those who place greed over the planet’s continued existence. This self-titled release is the perfect culmination of the band’s distinctive approach—so intelligent, intricate, heavy and angry—that in the end the listener feels like he’s been spent forty rounds taped to a heavyweight boxer’s glove as he pummels a dynamite factory, yet is infused with enough hope that the whole endeavor doesn’t end up mired in misery. The best of 2010? Well, that kinda stuff is relative to whoever’s doing the picking, but I’m personally at a loss to come up with something that can top this. They remain, in my humble estimation, the real deal. –jimmy (aztlanunderground.net))


AT OUR HEELS:
Misanthropy and Godlessness: CD
Crushing metalcore along the lines of bands like Trap Them, Cursed, and American Nightmare. The sound is full, heavy as fuck, and the vocalist sounds like his throat is engulfed in flames. A lot of tempo changes go on to keep things interesting. I do think when they pick up the speed they actually have more punch. The mid-tempo breaks are cool and allow the listener to collect their thoughts, but when the pace picks up is when it gets really interesting. I wonder how they would sound if they cranked out a number of thrashy songs back to back? “The Recluse” is my favorite track of the thirteen, as it goes off into the speedy realm with some speed metal touches, and the drums sound like their punching holes into the walls. –Matt Average (Creator-Destructor)


ARTICLES OF FAITH :
New Normal Catastrophe: 12” EP
I have to admit I was late to the AOF party. I had become a Vic Bondi fan after catching a couple Report Suspicious Activity shows a few years back. Then I went and chowed down on his back catalog, enjoying both Jones Very and Alloy. But I was lucky enough to catch both of AOF’s reunion shows in Chicago this fall. In a word—intense. But in addition to doing those shows, they have also put out a new five-song EP, their first new music in many moons. Every song on this record will put hair on your chest. Sorry ladies—no Nair included with the LP. With song titles like “With a Vengeance” and “The Hammer” what do you expect? No one in the band has lost their chops. This flies by with unbridled fury in fifteen minutes. Recorded by Jeff Dean (The Bomb) and mixed by J. Robbins (Office Of Future Plans), the production is rock solid without sounding too slick. Excellent return to form by these Chicago pioneers. Seek this out and thank me later. –koepenick (Alternative Tentacles)


ARTICLES OF FAITH:
New Normal Catastrophe: 12” EP
Bit of a surprise finding this in the bins. For those not in the know, this revered Chicago hardcore band hasn’t been active in at least twenty-five years and this recording shows they haven’t lost that spark that made ‘em so special. While the thrashing’s a bit tempered compared to the full-bore days of Buy This War, the righteous anger, topicality, and intelligence are still very much in evidence, and they can still mix it up quite nicely when they see fit. The real treat, though, is when they slow it down a bit and dabble in melody and sonic layering, coming up with something that straddles the line between later Hüsker Dü and the very early period before “emo” became a sad cliché. Faboo return to form and it’s definitely nice to have ‘em back. –jimmy (Alternative Tentacles)


ARRIVALS, THE:
Volatile Molotov: LP
One of the Grand Punk Paradoxes for me is this: I have loved punk rock for the past twenty-five years on a continual basis. I continue to love punk rock. Yet the music, the form, the approach, the culture, the intent, the delivery—practically everything about it—has fundamentally morphed away from its origins somewhere in the late ‘70s. So, if the Ramones, The Bags, The Weirdos, and the Clash are punk, and punk died, what’s left? (Punk’s death is something I don’t believe. I do believe that punk dies in people and that if you repeat something enough times, regardless of truth, people start believing it.) Are punks in their late thirties—too young to surf the first wave, but old enough to put a lifetime in—delusional? Merely hangers-on? Leeches attached to ghosts of nostalgia? No one seriously talks about a wide-scale punk music revolution anymore. Almost every lifer punk I know doesn’t even look like what when someone from the outside shuts their eyes and imagines a punk rocker. But no other term has come along, no other label’s ever stuck. Saying that it’s “music” is too broad; like the term “world music” is just fuckin’ stupid and racist (because I don’t know any bands that have recorded in outer space yet, all music is world music). Digging into smaller and smaller subgenres doesn’t do anyone any good. Parts further isolated will eventually be mocked, suffocated, and destroyed. The Arrivals bring all of this thinking to the forefront. Bar none, they are one of my favorite bands, and have been since their debut Goodbye New World, in 2000. So, I could say, “They’re so much more than punk,” but why divorce them from my favorite form of music so some squares will have fewer wrong preconceived notions and may actually give a wonderful band a chance? I want to celebrate it, bar none, not serve it on a clean plate to fancy, fickle people who mostly suck anyhow. So I came up with a quick, personally helpful device. If someone calls any band that I like “punk,” and they mean it as a compliment, I’ll take it. If someone dismisses music as “just punk,” and they mean it as a slag, that they’ve got the entire enterprise figured out and it’s now a waste of anyone’s time, they can go fuck themselves. With all that mind, The Arrivals have just made one of the best records—and have one of the strongest catalogs—of any band in the past ten years. Punk or not. It’s a big, fat fuckin’ paradox. –todd (Recess)


ARRIVALS, THE: Volatile Molotov: LP:
Volatile Molotov: LP
If the last record made me feel like a pirate (because of songs for the working class through eyes that are both brutally honest, yet romantic), this one feels like I’ve come ashore, only to find that all that’s left is a post-apocalyptic wasteland. There are a lot of songs about the end of the world, and coping; musically ranging from thrashers like “Two Years” to the more anthemic and beautiful “The Last Testament” that feel like they’re slowly building up to something really big. I say it’s a masterpiece. If this is what’s going to be playing as the world comes to an end, I say bring on 2012. –Kristen K (Recess)


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