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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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TOO MANY DAVES:
Weekend at Dave’s: CD
The first time I met Davey Tiltwheel was in Vegas. We were neighbors at the amazing NevadaPalace hotel. In a (totally uncharacteristic... yeah right) bout of drunkeness, I foisted a Hoosegow beer cozie on him and he returned the favor with a Too Many Daves one. I was struck by the band’s code. Beer, weed, pizza... I’m no Dave, but those are cornerstones in life. I was hooked. Many years later, I’m still listening to the Daves. They still play songs that feel like they’re taken right out of my life. Seriously, I’ve been eying up a hot dog spinner for a looooong time. I can’t get enough of the disc. Fun songs about... Beer, weed, pizza, dudes... It doesn’t get much better that that. Also, this disc supplies us with an answer to the age old question: How can you improve on Body Count’s “Cop Killer”? You get some kids to chant “FUCK THE POLICE” in the breakdown, that’s how! Shirts off, Dudes on! –ty (ADD)


TOMMY GUSTAFSSON & THE IDIOTS:
Eastern State Penitentiary: CD
This spinoff from the Swedish street punk band Da Skywalkers is incredibly corny, which shouldn’t be all that shocking considering that former band’s name. But I’m not complaining. It’s actually a hoot hearing Plan-It-X type political folk punk played by Swedes singing in English. Whether or not this is intended to be comedic, it’s fucking hilarious. The heartfelt, screamed, sociopolitical anthems included on Eastern State Penitentiary are quality, earnest fun. Hell, if The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and its sequels can end up being international successes, maybe Tommy Gustafsson & the Idiots can top the global charts, too. –Art Ettinger (Warbird, arbirdentertainment.com)


TINY KNIVES:
We’re Our Own Wolves: CD
Tiny Knives deliver dissonant tuneage that’s alternately arty and rooted somehow in hardcore (more in the aforementioned dissonance than in macho posturing and jackhammer rhythms), and is oddly poppy in places. Good, rowdy noise. –jimmy (Stank House, no address listed)


TIMMY’S ORGANISM:
Rise of the Green Gorilla: CD
There’s some seed of “rock” buried in there somewhere, but heaping helpings of assorted noise, synth-mania, psychedelia, humor, and oddness are piled up high to give things their own unique sheen. Its inherent “goodness” is ultimately based on taste, but it’s rarely uninteresting. –jimmy (Sacred Bones, no address listed)


TIMEBOMBS:
Mumbling: 10”

Whoah-ho-ho! This is so fucking ugly! Noisy and blown-out sonic nihilism. Mix Void with Drunks With Guns and you get something similar to this. I have nothing but respect for a band like Timebombs, who instead of playing it safe and growing boring, have decided to step away from a more acceptable sound, and actually become more “hardcore” than most hardcore bands out there. That might sound like a large statement to lay on some band, but, really, hardcore was never about playing it safe, taking it easy, and playing favorites to a crowd. That sort of behavior is for pussies. If you want a band that does that, then look up your local Heartbreakers or Stooges clone bands. On this 10” they go further out than they did on their recent LP. The sound is darker, noisier, more unpleasant, and so fucked up. Even the lyrics are as nihilistic and twisted with lines like, “I’ve prayed for the day I slit your throat,” “I need more dead, I need more slaughtered, I need to be dead,” and “Pitch black are the eyes that I see.” Yep... Can’t wait to catch these guys live in a couple weeks.

–Matt Average (Cowabunga)


TIFFS, THE:
Self-titled: 7” EP
Every once in a while, when you get records to review, you get a gem. A real treasure that keeps you focused on why reviewing records is fun. The Tiffs is a Japanese band and includes members of Blotto and Her Spectacles and this is their first EP. My second favorite track is on side B and is titled “Lost in the Super Drinking Life.” As if the title wasn’t super sweet in itself, the song truly brings to the table, in all its Japanese glory, some really kickass lyrics and tunes to boot. My most favorite is called, “Goodbye, Blue Monday!” which is on Side A and to truly appreciate it, you have to read the lyrics… pure poetry. All four songs on this record are tight. Just like most of my favorite Japanese bands, the bass sounds so good! I really enjoyed this record. –Corinne (Dirty Snuggies)


THIS DAY WILL TELL:
Too True to Be Good: CD
Five very young, wholesome-looking kids who have utilized the unfortunate sonic attack of nü-metal dorks like Enter Shikari. Pretty, sweet vocals give way to yowling, over-produced screamo stylings—another namedrop that works: Escape The Fate. This is terrible, terrible stuff. They namedrop God, iPhones and iTunes, they have witty song titles, and yet the lyrics themselves are bland and totally interchangeable—they all seem to be lamentations towards a lost love, but I can’t be sure. The band is clearly suffering from Bad Religion Syndrome—all the songs sound remarkably similar. They can clearly play the fuck out of their instruments and are possibly very sweet dudes, but that’s not necessarily a free pass. I’m sure there’s an audience for this type of stuff—Epitaph and AP Magazine seem to indicate as much—but Razorcake’s definitely not one of them. Steer clear. –keith (Indianola)


TESTORS:
Two Sides of Death: 7”
Hmmm... I like this, but if you’re curious about the Testors, then check out the album on Swami first, since it offers studio recordings. What’s on here are two live recordings (from 1978) that have a murky sound quality. It’s not horrible, but it doesn’t have the same blazing fire as the studio recordings. This stuff is pretty raw, and some of the low end is lost in the process. That said, the songs that are on here are pretty damn good. The previously unreleased “Drac” recounts the dilemma of being the Prince of Darkness and being on the run. The farfisa pushes this song over the edge and gives it the creature feature atmosphere. It’s definitely my favorite of the record. The B side is “It’s Only Death” and the version on here is exclusive to this release. The urgency is intact and may be more so due to this being a live performance. Plus the lyrics to this song, fuggin’ primo stuff—”You see I’m losing my heart, I’m losing my soul, I gotta keep the damn thing under control/ But I need a cigarette because I cancelled my mind”. Whoa! And, yep, the comparisons to the Dead Boys are accurate, but there’s a little more bluesy Heartbreakers style in there as well. Only 1,000 of these records are on the face of the planet. –Matt Average (Windian)


TILTWHEEL:
The High Hate Us: LP
I’m a man of glacial movement. I’m a marathon runner of creativity and productivity. My love of Tiltwheel is well documented because I self-publish. I re-tell Davey’s clown stories in front of kids when I talk at the library. I once made a decision to stop dating a lady because she didn’t appreciate that “back stage” for Tiltwheel means “van.” The mini-novel-length, three-part interview of Tiltwheel that was printed in Razorcake a good year before this record was released is the longest piece of “music journalism” (such a twatty term) I’ve ever done. It was worth every word and I really still don’t care if more than a hundred people read it in its entirety. I did it because I could and I wanted to and I didn’t have a boss yanking my chain. If you’re reading this and vehemently disagree with how high a regard I’ve kept and still keep for Tiltwheel, do us both a favor and put all that energy in making something of your own. Do it for fifteen years—through snapped bones, shanghaied hearts, rejected paperwork, douche bosses, termite swarms—then get back to me if you’re not selling insurance or haven’t completely disappeared into “real life.” I’m glad to say that The High Hate Us didn’t jump the shark—that it’s on par with the best of Tiltwheel—because I can’t afford to get these tattoos lasered off and I don’t know how one goes about recalling patron saints. Beautiful packaging, to boot. –todd (ADD)


TERRIBLE FEELINGS:
Demo 2010: CD
Good grief. The Swedes just know what they’re doing when it comes to mid-tempo melodic punk rock. The Vicious/Masshysteri, The Lost Patrol Band/Invasionen... pretty much the whole Ny Vag family, all great. And Terrible Feelings certainly don’t drop the ball. Somewhere between Igen-era Vicious and Knugen Faller’s LP. Frig. So good. Can’t wait for the inevitably incredible LP that these cats churn out. –Dave Williams (Self-released: myspace.com/terriblefeelings)


SWANN DANGER:
Staccato: EP
Post punk with a goth edge, similar to early Siouxsie And The Banshees. The music is dark with a tribal beat and an ominous sounding bass guitar. “A Minor Heartbreak” is my favorite of the three on here. It’s a bit more driving and the washes of noise only add to the subterranean atmosphere. I also really like how the bass sounds during the main verses. Sounds like there’s a guitar in there as well, though it’s used sparingly. This is some really, really good stuff and has certainly helped shake me out of a negative stupor towards the present state of music. These guys would fit perfectly on a bill with Magick Daggers and the Secret Society Of The Sonic Six. Someone get on that, and make it happen here in Los Angeles, please. –Matt Average (Mess Me Up)


SWANN DANGER:
Self-titled: 7”
I don’t want to take the easy road out and compare them to Siouxsie And The Banshees, but I cannot think of anything else. And by “I cannot think of anything else,” I mean that every second of this record makes me think of that comparison. –Bryan Static (Mess Me Up, no address)


SUNSHINE SS:
Throw My Brain Against the Wall: 7”
The opening track on this record is called “Peace, Love, and Sunshine SS” and is one of the most legitimately dirty hardcore songs I have heard in a long time. Early Black Flag or Circle Jerks are a great reference point. The guitar riffs sound borrowed from the early ‘80s, relying a lot on muted notes and quick shuffles in the chord progression. The band is able to inject more into their sound than sheer enthusiasm, though. The mid-tempo “Permanent Vacation” is deceptively clever, throwing in inverted chord structures with ease and a pleasant disregard for the listener. The production is warm with the right amount of grit between the groove and needle, if you know what I mean. This is top notch throwback style hardcore that would appeal the scummy sects of people ordering from the Grave Mistake catalog. –Ian Wise (Death, Agonies, And Screams)


SUMMER VACATION / JOYCE MANOR:
Split: 7”
Summer Vacation: gotta love these kids. They set up so many shows, and are pretty killer musicians. Catchy, angsty tunes that are equally questioning and complaining. I always love seeing them play and would love to see some more records out. Joyce Manor: Party Marty’s “rookie of the year” band. Do you have a Hot Water tattoo? Against Me tattoo? Jawbreaker? Chances are you’ll love this band as well. –Daryl Gussin (Muy Auténtico)


STREET PIZZA:
Cancerous Planet: CD
This CD is like a room full of first-graders who have eaten too many brownies. They have also been possessed by demons, and that’s why their little heads are spinning around until they pop off and fly across the room. You, the person listening to this grind/thrash disasterpiece, are like the teacher: just trying to figure out what is going on. You’re horrified at first, but then you realize it’s actually pretty fucking cool, at least until the kids’ parents show up. –mp (myspace.com/sxpxvafast)


STOP BREATHING:
Self-titled: 7”
When I got to the second song on this record, “Bombs Away,” I groaned. Oh great, I thought, another hardcore song about the world being blown to pieces. Then I realized something kind of scary: Even though punks have been singing about this shit for decades now, it’s still valid. I was on a flight recently with an air force guy who told me about how secure I should feel because of all the missiles the U.S. has ready to go, but it didn’t make me feel secure at all. It didn’t help that the guy was kind of an idiot, even though he assured me he wasn’t going to be the one pushing the button. I guess my point is no matter how samey shit like this starts to feel, it’s probably not a bad idea to keep talking about how fucked up the world is, and it sure doesn’t hurt to package that talk in the form of some cool hardcore. –mp (Rotten To The Core)


STONED AT HEART:
Party Tracks Vol. I: LP
One of the curious wrinkles of surrounding yourself with fellow music lovers—roommates, good buddies, significant others—is that when someone moves out or moves away, you come to realize that you don’t own some of your favorite music. And it happens with bands that you’re most familiar with, collectively. I was astonished at how few Big Boys, Bad Brains, and Bananas records I actually owned when I ended up living by myself. The bands seem so close. I listened to them so much. And there were gaping holes in my music library. And so it can go with local, great bands. “Oh, man, I’ll pick that up next time. I see you all the time.” It’s especially the case when so many of the members were and are in other bands like Toys That Kill, Can Of Beans, and Underground Railroad To Candyland. I’m totally guilty of this behavior. I don’t want to say that I take Stoned At Heart for granted, I don’t. But I really thought I’d actually reviewed this record and hadn’t. I first met Baby J., the lady voice in Stoned At Heart, as a sixteen-year-old-kid who was living in a shed behind a house in San Pedro. She’s been playing in bands ever since. Couple her voice to the sunny-on-top, questioning-in-the-middle, it goes-down-easy playing and singing of Todd Congelliere, Chachi, and Jimmy Trash, and you’ve got a record that’s super-duper familiar and comfortable, but traveling down another alley, off on a different errand. To those who don’t recognize a single person’s name in this review, think of indie rock made by punk rockers, so all the douchey, bourgeoisie preciousness is kicked to the curb, yet it’s pretty and mostly mellow, precisely played, emotionally convincing, and always moving forward. –todd (Recess, recessrecords.com)


STICKS AND STONES:
Nineteen Eighty Seven: 12” EP
I was like “ooh, keen, an album by that bubblegum band from Milwaukee!” Turns out it’s actually a hardcore band from New Jersey, recorded ((“in the spring of our youths”)) in—you guessed it—1987. I dunno. Not to be a heathen unbeliever/cranky jaded one or anything, but 1987 was a pretty shit year for hardcore. In point of fact, so was 1986, and, in large part, 1985. Even 1983 and 1984 were only really interesting if you were living in some tertiary market whose homegrown HC scene took off a few years after the national hotspots. By 1986 ((at the VERY latest)), pretty much all the good was gone from hardcore; people just kept playing some variant of it because they really had no idea what else to do. Or thus are my findings. To support said findings, i point to the fruity and musiciany intros to the songs “Contempt” and “Society’s Pressure.” From about 1984 on out, just about every hardcore band had some songs that had extended musician-y intro parts like these, which i claim stems from an either subconscious or intentionally repressed desire to play fruity musician-y music instead of hardcore. By 1987, people were completely bored with hardcore, but they were playing it anyway—that’s my point here. I’ve always viewed 1987 as the big pop-punk year, myself—there were the Hard-Ons and the first Lemonheads album and White Flag and 7 Seconds “New Wind” and the Descendents and the Oysters and a whole gob of shit i’m sure i’m forgetting—and whatever hardcore was in 1987, with the long songs and the fruity guitary intros and the no sense of humor, was just, like, dross to me. I don’t even know what “dross” is, but that’s what it was. Twenty-three years later, when none of this matters a pinch of shit, i still can’t completely divorce myself from the notion that these guys are just a bunch of kids who were late for the party and therefore don’t quite “get” it, which is fairly unfair, but such is life. In any event, this era of hardcore holds little to no interest for me, although this is well-played and fairly well-recorded ((if you discount the unlistenable triggered snare sound, which was a popular—God knows why—snare drum recording method for a few years starting around 1986)), and seems like the kind of thing that should have grabbed a bigger chunk o’ market share Back In The Day. I conclude by saying that the fact that forty-five-year-olds are still shaking their fists at forty-year-olds and telling them they don’t know shit about hardcore is a beautiful thing indeed. Thanks for the memories. BEST SONG: “Thanks For The Cash.” BEST SONG TITLE: “Contempt” i guess? FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Record is a single-sided 12”, with an etched b-side depicting, somewhat incongruously, one of those ‘50s styled microphones. –norb (Gunner)


STICK AROUND:
When We Ran: CDEP
This is the recording of a young band, a band that I don’t think has learned to play together correctly yet, but, goddamn, are they close. There is some definite growing room left to cover. They use “woah”s too often and sometimes don’t hit the notes quite right. Stick Around, don’t be discouraged, I strongly believe that you’re next release will be of even greater quality. Your brand of Lifetime-esqe melodic hardcore meets Latterman family vocals will be probably be amazing in the not too distant future. I believe in you! –Bryan Static (Carry No, no address)


STEREO STATE, THE:
Caffeine, Beer & Quoting Movies: 7” EP
Oddly enough, while I wouldn’t call bands like Hot Water Music or Kid Dynamite “beginner bands” (as in the kind of stuff someone gets into at a young age before finding the “really good stuff”), yet there’s practically a whole genre that focuses on that stuff as a prime influence. This falls under that territory (coarse vocals, with some “hardcore” moments despite being fairly melodic all around), and while, admittedly, I was ready to blow it off, I didn’t hate it by the end of the few songs here, thanks to some ‘ricks (what I’ve dubbed “guitar riff tricks”) that I tend to enjoy. –joe (Neutral Territory)


STEPDADS:
Deja Vu: 7”
I get a feeling off this slab that there is something at play here that I don’t understand. Four songs featuring heavily distorted vocals that blare over repetitive, heavy guitar riffs underscored with minimalist ‘80s drumming. It does not appeal to me, but I think it is representative of that distorted dance music that people in the tight pants and neon, Ray-Ban looking glasses dance around their apartments to between film class and their jobs at Buffalo Exchange. I’m not one hundred percent sure, but I think this is young people’s music. I promised I would not become one of those punks who dismiss everything young people like, but I don’t get it. –Billups Allen (NMG, no info)


STATE LOTTERY, THE:
When the Night Comes: LP
When the Night Comes isn’t necessarily a departure for The State Lottery. And I can’t imagine any fans of their previous full-length, Cities We’re Not From, being bummed at how it sounds. It’s not a departure, but there’s a definite shift at work here. Call it a slight “stylistic advancement,” or a “band maturing,” or whatever you want. The point being, it’s entirely effective. While Cities… was rich with a kind of wandering solemnity, When The Night Comes is firmly entrenched in rock and roll and the kind of detail-rich lyricism that dudes like Springsteen and Josh Ritter do so well with. While the band still manages to pen songs that sound like a Detroit winter come to life, this time around it’s filtered through the wire mesh of rock and roll, JD Salinger’s short stories, healthy doses of saxophone and organ, and even a hint here and there of ‘60s pop. I’m surprised they pulled it off, and more surprised that they make it sound so damn effortless. Bobby Colombo’s vocals still fall between Blake Schwarzenbach and Brendan Kelly, but his ability to tell a story has improved massively since the last record. When the Night Comes has its joyous, thundering gems (“Coming Alive” and “East Jordan”) and its heart-stung lamentations (“Little Song” and the album closer, “Spring, 2008, Detroit”). It’s what I wish people thought “indie rock” was when they used that term, and it’s probably one of the best records that came out in 2010. You can get the LP version from Salinas, or a free download of it at ifyoumakeit.com. I’d suggest you do both—the art is beautiful and the lyrics are more than worth reading. This is an awesome band and a terrific LP. –keith (Salinas)


STATE CHAMPION:
Stale Champagne: LP
Four-color gatefold sleeve and dust jacket with clear vinyl. It has the range, rawness, gait, emotionalism, and orchestration of Two Gallants and Avett Brothers, but not quite the lyrics or the power. The instrumentation is sparse and production is just-throw-a-mic-in-the-middle-of-the-living-room, which makes it very difficult to hear at times. There’s a little bit of drone and some oddly timed crescendo and decrescendo. Not a bad effort, but I’d like to hear some matured material that’s a bit more even-keeled. –thiringer (Self-released)


ST. FALL APART:
Somos Extremos: CD
I like the melodic sensibilities these guys put into the poppy punk songs they showcase and the fact that they aren’t afraid to let the two guitars deviate from whatever chord progression the bass guitar is playing. The songs are smart, “modern punk”-sounding without being awash in corporate punk suckdom, and the lyrics sound above the average pack of punters with guitars. Can’t say I dig the gruff, blown-out vocals in this context all that much, and that more or less boils down to personal preference, but on the whole they ain’t all that bad. –jimmy (No address listed)


SPAT:
Consumers Suck: CD-R
Straight up, no-bullshit political hardcore from Scotland. The occasional lyric will no doubt raise the hackles of the PC punk wing, but, on the whole, they stick to the topical; like mindless consumerism, war, and the hypocrisy of those who speak of resistance and direct action and instead get loaded. Nothing really groundbreaking in their delivery, but they are more than adept at the template and no doubt have little trouble getting a live crowd revved up. –jimmy (http://myspace.com/spatpunk)


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