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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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LENGUAS LARGAS:
Ese Culito: 12" EP
This music feels like it should accompany extremely dramatic situations. Drug-induced paranoid freak-outs or desperately dehydrated quests for water would work perfectly. The haunting echoes of this band’s many players reverberate through the speakers practically leaving light trails as your room and ears fill with the burning winds of Tucson, Arizona. With this record you get five strong gusts averaging at about two minutes a piece. From what I understand, this is also the first recording done as a full band. And full it most definitely is. –Daryl Gussin (Volar, volarrecords@gmail.com)


LEATHER:
Sterile: EP
Nice! Leather crank out blistering hardcore that has a little bit of Bl’ast in the guitar sound. Four songs that stick in the mid-tempo range, allowing the band to add interesting elements, such as the change up in “Zek,” and also how the vocals are delivered towards the end of the song. “Relapse” kind of bogs down, though it’s not a horrible song. Maybe cut the duration of the song down a bit? “Novitiate” picks up the pace and recaptures the energy established by “No Motivation” and the aforementioned “Zek.” The Jade Tree website alludes to previous Leather material being tough to get a hold of. Hopefully that’s going to change. This EP is pretty good, and I definitely want to hear more, past and future. –Matt Average (Jade Tree, jadetree.com)


KRANG:
Speed of Tent: 7"
Echo-drenched stoner rock. “Big deal,” you say. “What makes them so goddamned different than the tons of other bands doin’ this shtick?” They’ve got a clarinet player. Bet your band can’t boast the same. –jimmy (Mammoth Cave Recording Co., mammothcaverecording.com)


KICKING SPIT:
Psychorockbullshit: 12”EP
This is a hell of a record. As soon as you drop the needle, in swarms the bass and drums with a thick coating of feedback and you know you’re in for a ride. Imagine if Bob Mould jumped straight from Land Speed Record to Sugar. As a band, Kicking Spit boils down to hardcore shredders playing aggressive yet melodic noise rock, and they kill it! The hearty, breathy melodies take cues from the best bands of ‘90s college rock, while the guitar solos are constantly being kicked up a notch into total unrelenting eruption. Six songs on a 12” never seemed so logical. –Daryl Gussin (Tankcrimes)


JOE LALLY:
Why Should I Get Used to It: CD
Third solo album from Joe Lally. I thought Fugazi were a great band and the thing that made them stand out for me was Joe Lally’s style of playing (coupled with Brendan Canty’s drums). Clean, yet driving, and grooves that very few can attain in a convincing way. This album sounds very much like a Fugazi record, which makes me wonder if he was their primary songwriter. Every song on here is sterling: catchy, driving, great vocals, clean execution, and memorable for days. I find that the title track and “Revealed in Fever” have become sort of personal anthems. “Let It Burn” switches gears, with a more experimental side. There’s more of a minimal feel in how the percussion and bass work around one another. Easily one of my favorite albums this year. –Matt Average (Dischord, dischord.com)


JESU:
Ascension: CD/LP
Jesu’s latest full-length, Ascension, is surprisingly only their third, despite the band’s eight-year career. This is due in no small part to the plethora of EPs that the band has released. While he has other members that help when on tour and occasionally in the studio, Jesu is Justin Broadrick. The droney, shoegazer sound he creates also takes a slight nod to a doom, industrial influence, though it seems that the heavier take on Broadrick’s sound has lessened with the release of Ascension. Yet, in that delicateness, Jesu has found a quality that suits it well. It’s a sign of progression in the sound while still retaining some of the ethereal, ambient sound that declared the difference between Jesu and Broadrick’s former project, Godflesh. While I wouldn’t go so far as to say that Ascension is a “happy” album, it’s certainly not as dark and morose as much of Jesu’s previous releases. Might it be possible to listen to the ten songs on here and think more of a sunny, spring morning than an overcast winter afternoon? While I would have preferred a little more of a heavy edge to some of the music, it’s always good to see an artist progressing, especially if—as is the case with Ascension—it is done in a competent and well-played manner. –kurt (Caldo Verde, caldoverderecords.com)


JELLO BIAFRA AND THE GUANTANAMO SCHOOL OF MEDICINE:
Enhanced Methods of Questioning: CDEP
One of the things I loved most about punk rock as a kid was the often obscure and sometimes downright weird shit I’d learn about that would never make the television news or the papers. As intended, it fostered in me a healthy distrust of pretty much anything handed to me as “truth” by the government and media and the corporations that own ‘em, created a permanent habit of digging deeper for more information about something that’s caught my interest, and the trivia geek in me has a whole host of tidbits with which to freak people out at garden parties and sundry society shindigs. Dead Kennedys, of course, were a fount of occult (as in “secret” or “hidden,” so all you Jesus freaks can stop with the note-taking now) information, and some thirty years into our musician/fan relationship, Biafra can still plant that little seed of obscure info that’ll send me rushing to find out more. This time out, it comes via “The Cells That Will Not Die,” and specifically the tale of Ms. Henrietta Lacks upon which the tune is based (no, I ain’t gonna recount her story here. Go look her up yourself, ye lazy bastards). This, my friends, is what punk rock does at its best—it makes you think, to question, to use your sesos for something more than to act as an alcohol sponge or to deduce what Colorforms-type singer is gonna win the America’s Next Musical Equivalent of Popcorn talent contest. Musically, the five original tunes here (plus a hidden cover of a song called “Metamorphosis Explosion” originally by a band called the Deviants) follow the same pattern as those on their inaugural CD, The Audacity of Hype, namely the band finds a groove and milks it for all its worth while Biafra does what he does best, in this case rail against Silicon Valley millionaires overrunning the Bay Area like a plague of locusts, point out the nasty byproducts of America’s wars of empire, weigh in on the scourge of religion and the crimes of modern medicine, and take what appears to be a swipe at Bob Dole’s appearances in pud-pepping pill ads. As with its predecessor, the songs, on occasion, go a wee bit longer than maybe they should, but for some reason they seem a bit stronger here in smaller doses, and, ultimately, are light years ahead of much of the pack calling itself “punk” these days. It’s also a welcome relief that the songs here lean more towards a mutation of Killing Joke’s “deceptively simple, sonically rich, and all kinds of heavy” punk template than merely going through the motions of trying to out-Dead Kennedy the Dead Kennedys. Ultimately, nothing here is gonna change the minds of those that either love or hate Biafra, but those in the latter camp will find it a bit difficult to deny this is one of his more solid releases. This “having a real band for the first time in some twenty-five years” thing is suiting him much better than Lard ever did, and he’s doing something his old DK bandmates have thus far failed to do, which is remain creative, topical and, ultimately, relevant. –jimmy (Alternative Tentacles)


JEFFERY NOVAK:
Self-titled: EP
Can’t help but think of Syd Barret era Pink Floyd crossed with early Brian Eno. Add some glam flourishes, and you have a really good record. This seriously sounds like a lost gem from the early ‘70s, especially due to the guitar sound on “Remember All the Expectations” and “The World of Peter Brown.” The songs have an appealing dark side to them, be it the lyrical matter or the instrumentation, such as the keyboard and the sometimes spidery-sounding guitar. “Back at the Bottom” is the most upbeat of the four, while the rest have a little more of a maudlin, though sneering, attitude. Like this single quite a bit (limited to 500, so act fast). Definitely want to hear the solo albums. –Matt Average (Trouble In Mind, troubleinmindrecs.com)


JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD:
We Are the Champions: CD
Ever sit and just watch a sport that you know nothing about—curling, bocce ball, that dancing gymnastic thing with streamers and balls—and just zone out on it? No real frame of reference, but you can admire the dedication and obviously expert skill. There are both fields of competitors and enough fans for it to be televised. By this record’s name, I was expecting more Queen. More prance, Mensa, and opera. This had me thinking about a longhaired Weezer some moments, then some 2011 version of Led Zeppelin if it was two dudes the next. The songs change from channel to channel to channel, like they’re mimics ciphering a distant transmission. Harmless in a channel-flipping way, but not something I’ll paint my chest blue and cheer for when they’re playing. –todd (Infinity Cat, hello@infinitycat.com)


INCREDIBLE KIDDA BAND:
Radio Caroline: 7"
“Two songs from 1977 U.K. powerpop band” says the sleeve. Alllll right, I can get on this train, popping at a regular clip, like its on tracks; smoothly going around corners, up hills, real smooth but you can feel tiny little jerky moments that let you know a human created it, not a machine. Love it. –mike (Last Laugh, lastlaughrecords.us)


IMPULSE INTERNATIONAL, THE:
Mini Album: 10"
I feel like I’m starting to sound like a broken record talking about this band. But the truth is, the International Impulse do get better and better with every record. This really is their best record yet, and they’ve had a string of pretty good records. A lot of folks are trying their hand at power pop lately, and most sound stale and fake. Not here. This sounds like it came from the late ‘70s/early ‘80s. If this was released in 1975, it would have probably come out on Bomp! or a label of similar repute. I put this on, first song, “Bicycle Rider” comes on. I think it’s pretty good. Then “Where Did the Girls Go?” follows. I think it’s even better. Then the next song comes on. That one is better, then the next, and... I almost want to laugh because this is so good it’s near unbelievable. “New Century Life,” which ends this record, has something interesting going on with it. It’s as though it’s two separate songs. The first version is more filled out with the guitar and the second version has a more stripped-down, spontaneous feel to it. No summer is complete without some Impulse International in it. –Matt Average (Puta, myspace.com/putarecords)


HYGIENE:
Public Sector: LP
There is no doubt that Hygiene are in full control of their package. Music, artwork, references, matrix message, are all tightly considered. The music is cold, grey-skied, blunt, restrained, artful. Repetitive. Mechanical. Grating and sparse with melodic, wiry guitar work. Public Sector sounds like dark, feet-in-thick-boots dancing music for Orwellian robots. It is very English, busted pipes, and rust-stained concrete. Lyrics largely deal with middle-management bureaucracy in a large organization. Think of fluorescent lights flickering—casting everything in a pale, bloodless light. For years at a time. For those who enjoy the dangerous black ice traversed by the Estranged and Total Control, Hygiene’ll raise your banner and keep you in formation. Talented. –todd ((La Vida Es Un Mus, Paco@lavideesunmus.com)


HUNX AND HIS PUNX:
Too Young to Be in Lov: LP
Ten catchy tunes, some bubblegum but mostly ‘60s girl group-influenced pop. I’d say it’s even better than their previous LP (a comp of out of print, internet-expensive singles). Some of the shtick is dropped and songwriting seems to be the main focus. Lots of help from Shannon Shaw of Shannon And The Clams (check out her turn in “The Curse of Being Young”—goddamn!) Shaw’s vocals are much stronger than Hunx’s bratty whine and, on some songs, the backing vocals even overpower Hunx. If I have a complaint, I’d say that was something that should have been fixed during mixing. –Sal Lucci (Hardly Art)


HJERTESTOP:
Musik for Dekadente Ører: 7"
If I didn’t know better, I’d swear this was some long-lost ‘80s punk gem from Denmark. While it’s a new release from a band with an inception that dates no farther back than 2004, it definitely has an ‘80s feel to it. You get two thrashers and two slower tunes in all here, all of them with a deceptive pop undertow that gives them a little something more to remember them by. Good stuff. –jimmy (Fashionable Idiots)


HIGH TENSION WIRES:
Welcome New Machine: LP
One of the tenets of post-modernism is the lack of a center. What was on the outside one minute can be in the middle the next. It’s flux, unpredictable movement, interchangeable parts, marbles rolling around in a box. Inside of atoms, we can either know where the electron is or where it’s going. Not both at the same time. Same goes for what comes out of Denton, Texas and DIY punk rock. Put Mike Wiebe (Riverboat Gamblers, Chop Sakis) and Mark Ryan (the Marked Men proton in this example, since he’s doing the recording, guitar, and some songwriting) in the same room. Wha-bam! Filtrate with both the tried and true formulae of Chris Pulliam (Reds [pre-Marked Men]). Glug-glug, flash! Then agitate, accelerate, and excite with Gregory Rutherford (Bad Sports) and Daniel Fried (Wax Museums). Ba-boom! The result is something that Einstein, Picasso, Tim Kerr, and the Oblivians would all agree on. Welcome New Machine is perfect rock’n’roll for outcasts not looking for acceptance, fueled by an unquenchable thirst to keep making more music if others catch on or not. Shityeah. –todd (Dirtnap)


HAPPY THOUGHTS, THE:
Self-titled: CD
I reckon the foundation these kids are working from would be power pop, but the production has a raw, garagey feel to it, and the wisps of Teenage Fanclub and Jesus And Mary Chain that flitter around the edges would lead one to believe there’s more happening than is apparent at first blush. The hooks are aplenty, and the whole package is definitely worth a listen. –jimmy (Hozac, hozacrecords.com)


GRIM FANDAGO:
Birthmark Blues: CD
A four-piece from Australia comes at you from different angles and throws a few curveballs here. I’m hearing Jawbox-like guitar with some Off With Their Heads-type vocals. I like some of the song titles like “Dirt Doesn’t Need Luck” and “Horseland.” These guys are earnest and you can tell they are serious about this endeavor. I endorse this one and look for more sonic desserts from this band soon. –koepenick (Poison City)


GOVERNMENT FLU:
Are You Sorry Now?: CD
Kickass Polish hardcore going whop upside yer head and doing so without resorting to silly-speed trickery or blustery metal blowhard bullshit. They come in, beat you senseless, and head out the back door, quick ‘n’ impolite-like. Fuckin’ love that. –jimmy (Nikt Nic Nie Wie)


GET RAD:
Choose Your Own Adventure: 7" EP
Am I easily swayed by clever packaging? You bet your fuckin’ life I am! As the title implies, the accompanying booklet features the exploits of Cru Jones, whose life is pretty crazy since he won Hellpath, and by making key decisions for him, you lead him towards either ruin or true love. The music? Rock-solid hardcore with the lyrics printed on the back page of the booklet for those not easily distracted, but shit, I’ve got more important things on my mind, namely trying to figure out why every decision I make seems to result in Cru’s death. Creative, lots of fun, and, on the whole, a great listen. –jimmy (Halo Of Flies)


GATEWAY DISTRICT:
Perfect’s Gonna Fail: LP
Throughout this review, just think “Really great punk pop, but so much more.” Coming from America’s Scandinavia, Gateway District are Midwestern poetic. Of being born into failing industrial towns, down to specific streets as familiar as veins on forearms. Compelling, bubbling harmonies and backing vocals. Dark skies. Long winters. A deep appreciation for spring and summer. Constant renewal. What gives Gateway District repeated listens is their yearning, their ontology. They’re concerned and dealing with the nature of being; not just beers, breakups, boohoos, and yahoos! But some deep thinking and placement: “You think you’ve got it all figured out/ that’s when the bottom drops out / looking for perfect’s gonna fail you.” Perfect’s Gonna Fail is an album that sounds like a shared relationship between four musicians. In fact, its strength is in the lattice of overlapping types of relationships the band examines: From memories of high school to the drifting-away of friends by the passage of time or time stolen away by addictions. Records like these make me proud to self-identify as a DIY punk. So smart, rockin’, and meaningful. –todd (It’s Alive)


FUTURE VIRGINS:
Western Problem: LP
I spent a few years in college as a the music director for the local college rock station, and after countless hours of listening to new music in order to make the decision about whether to add new discs to our rotation, I got incredibly good at the “recommended if you like” section of our description page. Problem was, even though I could suggest to people, “you’ll like this if you like that,” it became more and more difficult to differentiate between “good” and “bad” music. For a period of time, I thought I’d lost my passion for music; it all just sounded derivative. I feel like a band like the Future Virgins would have snapped me out of that line of thinking pretty quickly had they existed back then. These guys knocked me on my ass with their first seven inch and nothing’s changed with each subsequent release. This is probably the best DIY pop punk band in existence, and I don’t apply such labels lightly. Perfect, passionate, and energetic songs that make me want to jump around my bedroom all night long with a huge smile on my face. I didn’t expect this to top their previous efforts, but I think it just might have! I dare someone to try to knock this out of its current “best record of 2011” position. –Chris Mason (Plan-It-X South/Starcleaner, plan-it-x.com, starcleaner.com)


FUCKED UP:
David's Town: LP

Fucked Up has become known for their unique vinyl-only releases, and David’s Town, is no exception. This is a concept record—with artwork making it look like a fake compilation—and the band doing garage rock in the personae of eleven bands. The fictional bands on this record are all from the fictional town Byrdesdale Spa, U.K.—setting for the narrative of their forthcoming LP David Comes to Life—with the title clearly a nod to the forthcoming LP. Keeping up the premise of a fake compilation, the eleven songs on this record all sound very different, recalling a slew of bands spanning the entire garage rock subgenre. Each song features a different vocalist or performer, with guest performances by Danko Jones, Dan Romano, The Cloud Nothings, and others. The songs are all catchy, with some great hooks and interesting riffs, each offering a distinct and unique sound, as though written by different bands—which is obviously the point. Those who think Fucked Up is just another hardcore band won’t really get this record, but that’s okay, it’s not for them. This record will appeal most to diehard Fucked Up fans, particularly those into their experimental side, and fans of garage rock. The curious should give this a try as well. They may be pleasantly surprised.

–Paul J. Comeau (Matado)


FROZEN TEENS / STREET LEGAL:
Split: 7"
Frozen Teens: Somewhere between Onion Flavored Rings and Future Virgins on the pop punk spectrum. Definitely the biggest surprise I’ve had in a long time. Is it any surprise a band this good comes from Minneapolis? There must be something in the water up there. Street Legal: Pretty awesome hardcore. Reminds me slightly of This Is My Fist! mixed with Brutal Knights. All in all, very recommended. –Bryan Static (Shut Up)


FOLDED SHIRT:
Self-titled: 12”
After a sterling EP, these Cleveland mongoloids return with twelve black inches of musical fuckery. Never straight forward, or typical. Instead, they go to outer realms, make some noise, use children’s instruments for color, assault the senses with hyper tempos, discordant breaks, odes to ice machines, and more. Not for the meek. –Matt Average (Fashionable Idiots, fashionableidiots.com)


FLESHTONES:
Brooklyn Sound Solution: CD
Goddamn, this band just keeps going, and I mean that in a good way. They’ve been around since 1976 and have been busy every year since. Twelve songs in just under thirty minutes. Featuring Lenny Kaye, y’know, the Nuggets guy, and recorded by Ivan Julian (Richard Hell And The Voidoids). Most of the songs are instrumentals (seven out of twelve). presumably to showcase Kaye’s guitar. Highlight for your next party mix should be “I Can’t Hide It.” Kids today need to know The Fleshtones! –Sal Lucci (Yep Roc)


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