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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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HELLSHOVEL:
Hated by the Sun: CD
Hellshovel, from Montreal, is fronted by an ex-member of Demon’s Claws and also features drumming by garage rock troubadour Bloodshot Bill. Musically, this is a lo-fi garage rock record with heavy psych influences, and it’s really fucking good. Take any band out of the current wave of lo-fi garage rock bands, let’s say something like The Oh Sees for example, take all of the pretentiousness out of it, and cover it with a thick layer of ‘60s psych and you might be somewhere in the ballpark of this record. I can also hear some King Khan & BBQ influence here too. Recommended. –Mark Twistworthy (Slovenly, slovenly.com)


VERSE:
Bitter Clarity, Uncommon Grace: CD
From the very beginning of their existence, Verse has been a band to push the boundaries of what is modern hardcore, forging a distinct and recognizable sound unlike anything else out there. Their first two albums, 2004’s Rebuild, and 2006’s From Anger and Rage have special places in my heart not only for personal reasons, but because they are two of the finest hardcore records of all time. With Bitter Clarity, Uncommon Grace, Verse returns with their first album since reuniting and unleash one of their finest records to date. The sound that the band developed on their first two records—and refined on 2008’s Aggression, their third LP—reaches its finest expression on this recording. The raw, searing riffs and brooding melodic riffs for which Verse is known are all here in abundance, with an increased level of guitar wankery and technicality thrown in the mix, as in the track “The Relevance of Our Disconnect,” one of my favorites on the album. It’s impossible to discuss a Verse album without talking about the lyrics. Vocalist Sean Murphy is one of my favorite lyricists, for his deeply personal and fiery political lyrics. The two are bound together tightly on almost every song on Bitter Clarity. My favorites include the previously mentioned “The Relevance of Our Disconnect,” from which the name of the album is derived, “Finding a Way out When There Is No Way,” and “The Silver Spoon and The Empty Plate.” The last of these finds Murphy at his most direct, in terms of political expression with the chorus “Police are pigs, [and all] justice is blind / greedy men in suits only serve to divide,” words to which I think everyone reading this can scream along. While critics might be down on the band for breaking up and reuniting, questioning the legitimacy of their current run, let me annihilate all of them right now. Bitter Clarity, Uncommon Grace is the real deal, a defining statement from a band that still has a lot to say, and a record we’re all sure to be listening to and discussing for years to come. –Paul J. Comeau (Bridge 9)


HAWKS:
Push Over: LP
Some Minnesota malcontents kick up a mean racket here. Gruff vocals dripping vitriol, lurching rhythms, loud guitars, and an overall attack that would’ve easily earned them an Amphetamine Reptile comp slot two decades ago. –jimmy (Learning Curve)


VERLAINES, THE:
Untimely Meditations: CD
I think Graeme Downes has lost his mind. The longtime Verlaines frontman is known for obtuse lyrics, unusual arrangements, and vocals that slalom between the melodic and the challenging. I’m familiar with most of the band’s previous nine studio albums and there isn’t one like Untimely Meditations in the bunch. At first I thought it was going to be a more direct record. The opening song, “Born Again Idiot,” has lyrics I could grasp on first listen and a great guitar riff that went right from A to B. All right, I thought, let the Verlaines make a more commercial album. They’ve paid their dues over the past thirty years, let ‘em indulge. How wrong I was. This record swerves wildly, not just from song to song but within songs. Horns that sound like Van Morrison. Guitar lines like Steely Dan. A boozy rhythm section that calls to mind the Kinks early ‘70s days on RCA. Sounds awful right? Even if you dig one or more of those elements, they have no right being in the same beaker. I think Graeme Downes is crazy for trying and genius for pulling it off. It’ll take me months to wrap my head around all ten tracks, but I’ll be trying. –Mike Faloon (Flying Nun, flyingnun.co.nz)


HATED ‘TIL PROVEN:
Songs for the Short of Attention: CD
This awesome political hardcore band from England delivers an excellent debut album with Songs for the Short of Attention. It suffers from some overly metal lead guitar lines here and there, but it’s a fast-paced, vibrant release overall. There’s a clear Exploited influence, as well as an influence from catchier newer bands like Leftöver Crack. Now as always, simple political punk plays extra funny with a British accent. Or maybe I’m simple for thinking so. –Art Ettinger (TNS, tnsrecords.co.uk)


HANDICAPITALIST:
Raw Punk Rock: CD-R
This is the shittiest looking demo I’ve ever seen. They’re not even trying and it doesn’t deserve a review. A song on here called “Smart Girls” is about how low IQs make the singer’s “dick get soft.” He goes on (to quote the lyric sheet), “I don’t give a shit about those boobs that you flaunt, over achievers (sic) are the ones that I want.” So, for a second, you think maybe he doesn’t like smart girls anymore because he says “over achievers.” You think he’s over... achievers, but then you realize that he just spelled overachievers wrong. So, later, when he sings “I only fuck smart girls,” in the chorus, it makes me wonder how the hell he’s doing it. Maybe every girl is a smart girl in comparison to him. Whatever, this CD-R didn’t play. –Craven (No address)


VENENO LENTO:
Self-titled: EP
Excellent record! Tuneful and driving punk rock from these guys. There’s a definite U.K. influence, but not a starry-eyed knock off. You can hear it in the guitar playing and some of the riffs, which sound inspired by the likes of Steven Kent (the Business) and Nicky Garratt (U.K. Subs). The songs are mid tempo and catchy. You get some fist pumpers like “Eu Não Quero!” and the awesome “Meu Caminho O Inferno” (definitely one of my favorite songs of the summer—the guitar riff, the chorus, and the backing vocals that come in at the end—whoa!), then there are some slightly slower songs like “Arprisionado” and “Garotos De Rua” to let you catch your breath. Brazil has a lot of high quality bands lately. Oh how I’d love to go down there and witness it firsthand... –Matt Average (Nada Nada, info@nadanadadiscos.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Mystery School Records Presents Forbidden Fruits of Rock N Roll: CD
This compilation includes twenty-seven songs by twenty-seven bands, mainly from the seedier pockets of punk. The high points are previously unreleased tracks by The Hookers, Self Made Monsters, and Barbatos. Other popular bands featured include Dwarves, Midnight, ANTiSEEN, and Brody’s Militia. As with any quality comp, a handful of the groups are totally new to me, the best of which are the Briefs-like Mommy Sez No and the brutal Pier Six Brawlers. Not that calling a comp way above average is saying much in the dreaded world of comp-land, but this really is well worth looking for. –Art Ettinger (Mystery School, mysteryschoolrecords.com)


GROND:
Steel Coffins: CD
Basic metal from Russia. Not even a Celtic Frost cover could save this disc from what it was destined for: a date with a garbage can. – –Juan Espinosa (Atomic Carnage, no address)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Inxcompxlete: 7”
Jeebus, where to begin: the packaging for this 7” compilation is a complete monstrosity. You have a plain white album jacket screen printed with the track listing on the back cover. The front cover is adorned with a random 12”, also screened but is completely useless since the music is contained on a separate 7” whose dust sleeve is glued onto a black piece of paper sized to fit inside the 12”. Frustrated yet? You also get a turntable mat (whether you need it or not, and let’s face it: you don’t.) All this nonsense almost makes the CD inside a 7” sleeve a good idea. Shitty packaging aside, this is actually a pretty solid comp featuring In Defence, Sick Mess, Guns N Rosa Parks, Instant Asshole, and the mighty Conga Fury leading the way. As you can imagine, the bands are all of the hardcore/thrash/what-have-you variety with the whole comp breezing by in a matter of minutes. A musically decent comp with terrible artwork equates to: meh. It is what it is. –Juan Espinosa (World Won’t Listen)


GRAND HOTEL PARADOX:
Rust: CD
I can’t say I’ve ever had the opportunity to review a band from Dubai, but there’s a first time for everything. Eight songs clocking in at twenty-four minutes from this trio seems a little short, but it’s still enough to gather an idea of their sound. There are two vocalists, one sounding like Blake Schwarzenbach pre-polyps surgery and the other fitting what I would imagine a punky nerd would sound like if he fronted an indie rock band. (Yes, I realize that makes no sense, but in my brain it fits perfectly.) The energy on these songs is upbeat; the majority of the music is a combination of indie rock and punk, both in a more poppy version, but not sounding over-polished. The strongest song on Rust is the tune “Home.” It’s not as fast as some of the other songs or as punk-influenced, but it’s got a more emotional feel than the other material. Like many albums I review, Rust isn’t a horrible album, but it’s not a great album either. It seems to fall on the better side of average, which is a good step in the right direction. Tightening some of the songs and songwriting (there were times when the vocalist seems to be singing lyrics so fast he’s almost tripping over them) would help. Also, there is the sense that these songs lack a coherency as one unit; they seem to not flow as well together on the album as they might have. The problem isn’t so much their order on the album as it might be the way the band seems to write songs. Rust doesn’t seem as consistent as it could or should be. –kurt (grandhotelparadox.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
From Russia with Hate: CD
I fell out of the heavy and speed metal scene when I was fifteen or so, but I still have a soft spot (irony!) in my heart for the genre. I lot of what I hear these days, especially on regional comps such as this, is gaggingly one-dimensional; hearing one band on the comp is more or less the same as hearing any other band on the record. That was not, I am damn pleased to say, the case with this outing. From Russia with Hate features fifteen bands who have all parachuted squarely into the black metal drop zone. The stereotypically “evil” names across the board are a dead giveaway but there is a surprising diversity of sounds among those bands. Some of the tunes are fairly typical black metal offerings, and yes, there is an abundance of cookie monster vocals, but even those garden-variety metal bands were actually pretty good at such garden-variety songs. Some of the songs bore the musical tattoo of Napalm Death pretty clearly, and some even strayed towards the anarcho-punk border, bearing gifts for Amebix and Discharge. My personal favorite, “Metal Zombies” by Blood Pollution, is highly reminiscent of Kill ‘Em All-era Metallica, and that sound fucking rules. So if you’re into black metal, check this out. If you don’t like black metal and somebody happens to play this for you, give it a try. –The Lord Kveldulfr (Wings Of Destruction, wod-prods@mail.ru)


GIVE:
“Heaven Is Waiting” b/w “One” : 7”
Give shred another epic post hardcore single on this 7”. I love that Give has such a plethora of 7” singles out right now, and it’s cool to see that each of them is on a different label that they want to support and work with. I also noticed that each one features a photo of a different member of the band as a cover, which was also neat. On this 7”, “Heaven Is Waiting,” is another track showcasing the band at their best, but the real gem on this for me is the B Side track, “One.” Of the two tracks, I feel that “One” captures the essence of Give much better than “Heaven Is Waiting,” though each are excellent for someone new to the band to check out. Rock’n’rolling post hardcore doesn’t get much better than this! –Paul J. Comeau (React!, givemusical@gmail.com)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Discharge Tributo: CD
Usually, tribute compilations aren’t my thing. Yet, for some reason, I seem to really enjoy Discharge tributes. I still have, and listen to, the “Discharged” comp from Allied Records from about twenty years ago. And this, the latest in Discharge trib comps, is pretty damn good and has been in constant rotation in my fallout shelter for a good couple months. All the bands on here are from Brazil and are definitely inspired by the reason for this compilation. Some stay true to the song, and others put their own stamp on it, such as Apokalyptic Raids doing slowed down version of “Decontrol.” Disarm seem to channel early Black Flag and mix it in their D-beat on “Religion Instigates.” Nuclear Frost put a bit of a minimalist spin on “The End” while retaining the abrasive edge and churning bass. Corja slow it down with some near rock‘n’roll and jazz vibe in their punk on “Anger Burning.” Then you have bands like Karnekrua (I need to hear more from these guys!), Armagedom, Social Chaos, Açao Direta who hand in some raging versions that are worth the price of admission alone. Seriously, when the bands are raging, this stuff is f’n great. Not only do you get some awesome bands on here, this comes packaged with a lyrics sheet that folds out to a Discharge poster on the other side. –Matt Average (Terrotten, terrotten@terrotten.com)


GIVE:
“Flower Head” b/w “Kiss the Flame”: 7”
Post hardcore rockers Give return with another single. “Flower Head” is one of my favorite of their songs for its noodly bass intro and grooving riffs throughout. It’s yet another song with an epic sing-along in the chorus. The B Side, “Kiss the Flame,” is equally awesome for the sheer amount of guitar wankery going on. This is easily one of my favorite of their singles. –Paul J. Comeau (Youngblood, givemusical@gmail.com)


UP THE ACADEMY:
“Gimme Gimme” b/w “Pretty Bird”: 7”
Side A starts things off with some swampy garage rock with a somewhat creepy refrain of “just give me what I want.” Sometimes I can dig slide guitars when done tastefully, which they are in this case. Side B is instrumental indie rock that starts off promising enough. I mean, I was hearing some weird GSL type stuff, but it quickly devolves (or evolves depending upon on your perspective) into prog rock territory. Side A’s telling me I should give this band another chance. I am a big fan of the screen printed cover on a Pabst box as well. –Chris Mason (Replay)


GIVE:
“Boots of Faith” b/w “Going Confetti”: 7”
Another single from post hardcore rock’n’rollers Give. The A Side, “Boots of Faith” has some fast, more hardcore-sounding verses, but gets groovy on the choruses. “Going Confetti,” on the B Side, is a sweet jam with some great sing-along parts with the chorus, “We no longer need to dream / we can create everything.” If you haven’t checked out this band yet, you’re seriously missing out. –Paul J. Comeau (Deranged, givemusical@gmail.com)


TYRED EYES:
The Piercing Eyes, the Thousand Lies: LP
What is it about Scandinavia? Back in the day it was the raw hardcore…. then recently we’ve had the joys of Smalltown, No Hope For The Kids, Gorilla Angreb, Knugen Faller, Vicious, and a host of other youngsters banging out stuff that sounds unmistakably “Scandinavian” but has originality bursting from the seams. This Gothenburg band takes pieces of all the above bands, melding knowledge of the past but with something new and vibrant. Sounding somehow familiar yet fresh and new. This band takes everything I love about bands from Sweden and Denmark and blend them with current West Coast heroes like Toys That Kill. Songs of drinking, firing squads, and not liking anyone work just fine for me. It’s rough and raw but the male/female vocals give it a certain sweetness that acts like the ginger back to your Fernet shot. This is one of those gems you’ll have to make an effort to track down. Trust me; it’s worth the effort. –Tim Brooks –Guest Contributor (Alleycat, alleycatrecords.se)


TY SEGALL BAND:
Slaughterhouse: CD
Bad garage is like bad grindcore or bad ska. With enough equipment, volume, and grooming, people are fooled easily enough. These modes are also three easy entrances into music. With garage, especially psyche, after all the pedals are bought and the instruments and haircuts are fussed over, good bands go on to tackle the ghosts, addictions, habits, sinew, miracles of headspace and timespace, the danger and dissolve, the tightened fists and skyless nights. One has to offer more than surface gloss, price tags, and logos if quality’s a consideration. The Ty Segall Band’s captured something powerful in Slaughterhouse. It’s hard to pinpoint and that’s where the pleasure in repeated listens is coming from. It’s a bad trip in the best way. The playing’s powerful, precise, and fucking huge. It sounds like it’s dragging chains and there’s no muffler on the exhaust. Dark star exploding. Not much light’s escaping despite the tremendous velocity. Jeez, this is great stuff. Hey Emily. –todd (In The Red, intheredrecords.com)


GIGLINGER:
Red: 7” EP
Bit of a mystery band here—no info whatsoever on the release outside of a red inner sleeve with the band name, the name of the release, the track list, and the speed at which it should be played. There’s a MySpace page with little more info than that they’re from Finland, as well as a link to a band site that’s purportedly been hacked by some Muslim extremist group. The tunes are catchy, no-frills mid-tempo punk rock with “Who Wants It All” being the standout, with a repetitive lead throughout that acts as one wicked little hook. From what else I was able to glean from the internet, this is the fourth in a series of four-song EPs from ‘em. –jimmy (no address)


TRUE RADICAL MIRACLE:
Termites: LP
Lumbering and sinister music that is darker than dark—even more so during a long mid-day summer afternoon listening. The raspy vocals have a hot and dusty quality about them, as words are shouted and sometimes delivered with a gritting output. It’s as though the vocalist is reaching down deep and getting the lyrics out through some intense pain. The music is heavy without being overwrought and misanthropic in tone without beating you over the head. Not a common approach these days. Instead of stomping, kicking, and slobbering all over themselves in impotent anger, the songs peel away a little with every pass, revealing a darkness that cannot be pinned down. The guitars ring out and sometimes bash over rolling percussion. The bass snakes around real shifty and casts shadows in places where there shouldn’t be shadow. It’s the sort of music you “crawl inside” and let it consume you, blocking out the surroundings, as you soak in your malaise. Excellent record. One of my favorites for summer listening. –Matt Average (Iron Lung, ironlungrecords@hotmail.com)


FUTURO:
Self-titled: EP
Pretty damn good record here. Kind of has a late ‘80s, early ‘90s feel, more of a post hardcore vibe via DC filtered through present day Brazil. Features the guitar player and drummer from B.U.S.H., so you can hear a smidge of that late band in the mix, but this is more tuneful and less thrashy (though they do resurrect a B.U.S.H. song, “Maos Atadas,” on the second side). Despite the speed and overall drive of the music on here, Mila Leao’s voice combined with Pedro Carcalho’s jangling guitar gives the music a slight ethereal touch. Very good! It’s this quality that really grabs my attention. Among all the noise and furor there’s this overriding sense of calm. Kind of a strange juxtaposition, but it works. Don’t hesitate in getting a copy of this record. –Matt Average (Nada Nada, info@nadanadadiscos.com)


TROUBLED SLEEP:
Poltergeist: 7”
This second EP from a quartet out of Brooklyn dish up four new tracks with fresh, unadorned female vocals and early ‘90s left-of-center indie rock structures. Borrowing from My Bloody Valentine and The Breeders’ stripped-down tunes, Troubled Sleep is straight up college, coffee house rock. “Teenage Everything” adds a chorus of male vocals lending a layer to their Wonderbread sound. While it’s still early in the game for Troubled Sleep, this oughta ease you into your morning. –Kristen K (Ripe, riperiperiperipe.com)


TONY SLY & JOEY CAPE:
Acoustic: Volume Two: CD
Just a week before I had to turn this in to Todd, I got the shocking news of Tony Sly’s death on August 1, 2012. I had a completely different review written prior to hearing about his passing, but now I’d like to say that although I wasn’t a huge fan of No Use For A Name, I was a budding fan of Tony Sly’s solo work which was more than folk punk, more than a former frontman flying solo. While I know I’m supposed to be writing a review here, I’d like to point to Tony’s diverse body of work: eight records with No Use For A Name, two solo albums, Scorpios, a collaborative work with Cape, Jon Snodgrass and Brian Wahlstrom, plus Acoustic: Volume Two and its predecessor. Yes, Sly’s death was sudden. Yes, he will be missed. And yes, he was an awesome example of a constantly evolving musician, courageously tramping down the acoustic route. But now it’s time for you to find this out for yourself. –Kristen K (Fat Wreck Chords)


FUCKING WEREWOLF ASSO:
Self-titled: 7” EP
Four tracks of noisy with a synth where a guitar usually sits, titles culled from the lead singers of different bands, personal lyrics, and a bouncy, angry delivery. –jimmy (Alleycat)


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