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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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CYNARAE:
Self-titled: LP
Holy shitballs. Total ‘90s Bremen hardcore worship ala Morser, Systral, and Carol, with a hearty dose of the same era’s Canadian counterparts (Uranus, One Eyed God Prophecy, Drift, Jonah, et al). Heavy, chaotic, melodic, evil, and just pummeling. This is so up my alley that it almost feels unfair to review it. My only “complaint” is that it should be about five times as long. Incredible. –Dave Williams (A389, a389records.com)


CUSTODY BATTLE:
Self-titled: 10”
Flagstaff, AZ’s Custody Battle come out of nowhere, swinging with both fists. It’s catchy-punk violence to infinity and back. Wild, off-kilter songs with maximum shredditude. Silk-screened covers, hand stamped labels, self-recorded, self-released (?), this is “DIY or DIE” in the flesh. This is Arizonafied San Pedro punk played by weirdoes for weirdoes. Bizarre house party ruckus played by guys who have probably spent a decent amount of time playing in straight-up metal bands. The surprise band of the summer. Get into it. –Daryl Gussin (Morning Star)


CRIMINAL CODE:
Hollowed: 7”
Pumped up, yelly, Wipers-inspired hardcore punk outta the Tacoma/Seattle area. Relentless and emotional—with two separate guitarists each approaching the song in their own unique way—Criminal Code creates an addictive combination of penetration and fuzz. All packaged in minimalist cover art. Prepare to give yourself a couple minutes to come down after listening to this record. –Daryl Gussin (Deranged)


CONNIPTION FITS:
Street Songs: CD
Some good old, straight-up boots, spikes, and mohawk punk. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Vocalist Jessie Vile spits out venom with her lyrics that match the relentless jackhammer of the music. I’d love to see them play. –ty (Rockin’ Stan)


CONFINES:
Some Sick Joke: 7”
Second 7” from these totally underrated Boston thrashers. I think I recognize the first two songs from their demo tape, but the flip side is a brand new, twisting, angry dirge that is reminiscent of Black Flag but has that sort of attitude that is awkward, but somehow still confident, that reminds me of the AmRep catalog. The lyrics are excellent, as I’ve come to expect from the band and the singer’s previous stint with Cut The Shit. I like that the band is very open politically and covers important topics without relying on rhetoric or clichés. They discuss punk and activism as things that are intrinsic and important to each other. There’s a recurring theme in their releases of passion within punk causing disillusionment because their expectations are so high, but the anger is coupled with an urgent need to progress their surroundings by pushing harder rather than giving up. Punk viewed in this light is—for lack of a better term—almost spiritual and viewed as something that is valid even if marred. This is the best hardcore record I’ve heard so far this year and it’s going to be hard to top, but that’s the point, right? These guys are just setting the bar higher to see who has the audacity to jump. –Ian Wise (Labor Of Love)


COGNITIVE DISSONANCE:
Into Madness: LP
Cognitive Dissonance has been shredding faces for several years now, both on the road and on recording. They’ve managed to capture the blistering intensity of their live set on this, their most recent LP. Cognitive Dissonance plays raw, heavy crust with a strong tinge of black metal. Into Madness features seven new songs and a rerecording of an early song, “Omens of Doom,” from the tape of the same name. There’s just the right mix of grit and polish on this recording, capturing the band’s live experience without losing one note of their great riffs and nonstop shredding. “Repercussions” and “Remain” were two tracks whose riffs I particularly enjoyed. Lyrically, the band is on point, with sharp lyrics conveying green, anarchist, and DIY punk ethics in straightforward and relatable language. I particularly enjoyed the lyrics to “Manufactured Genocide” for its challenge to eating meat. Not only is this record excellent musically, but it also features great liner notes in the form of a black and white printed zine. Lyrics to each song are provided, along with commentary, as well as some badass looking photos and art by an array of talented artists. This keeps finding its way back onto my turntable for repeated listens, and you should do yourself a favor and get it on your turntable as soon as possible. I can’t recommend it enough. –Paul J. Comeau (Ecophagy, ecophagylv@gmail.com, piratefrontier@hotmail.com)


CHANTEY HOOK, THE:
Self-titled: CDEP
Romantic, driving, poetic rock’n’roll is tough. Tough to not be maudlin. Tough to not be cheesy. Tough to not rip off the intellectual property estates of Bruce Springsteen or Neil Young. Thoughtful, dynamic, evocative, story- and romance-driven punk is even tougher. Leatherface’s ghosts and fingerprints are on the edges of The Chantey Hook. But they’re leagues apart from a band that zips itself into a Leatherface suit as easily as a banker sleeves into a pressed shirt. I have a longtime respect for Seth Swaaley, the singer and principal songwriter of Super Chinchilla Rescue Mission, now Chantey Hook. As it is with any music-with-meaning, this CD benefits from close listens and read-alongs. If you take time with it, let the relationship build under moss-bricked bridges, during loose-cylinder drives, when “the struggle’s always near, but the party’s always on,” that’s when The Chantey Hook shares. It won’t give you everything on the first time around the block. It’s not that easy. The gift The Chantey Hook delivers in four songs is nothing short of that reminder that humans make music and music can sometimes be wonderfully redemptive. “We’ll get there, but we ain’t there just yet.” –todd (thechanteyhook.com, music@thepersistenceofsound.com)


CAPITALIST KIDS, THE:
Lessons on Love, Sharing, and Hygiene: LP
Timeliness is tricky. Political ideas that are topical can seem silly in time, but that can be ignored if songs are written with music that stands on its own. Nobody complains about how outdated the references are in Dead Kennedys songs, right? Aiming for the sweet spot between Propagandhi and Mr. T Experience, the political songs match the love songs about one to one. Perfect for when you can’t decide between Bracket or Crass. I’ve listened to this record half a dozen times before Razorcake ever sent me a copy, so I’m probably the most qualified person to take a whack at this. I’ve been around this record for a while. I’ve overheard conversations between band members as they talked about these songs before the band had learned them and I’ve seen the songs played a handful of times before the recordings got made. At this point, I feel like I know this record like the back of my hand. The pop punk community should be happy that a band like the Capitalist Kids is playing right now. This isn’t me giving the old argument of “what happened to the politics in punk rock?” It’s always been there, it’s just been in the pop punk section of the store. In a section of rock dominated by songs about youthful nostalgia and partying, I hope the Capitalist Kids spark arguments. I hope they get people talking who don’t normally like to think about these kinds of things. If you like tight Lookout-styled pop punk, these guys are some of the hottest shit on the market. Get with it. –Bryan Static (Toxic Pop, toxicpoprecords.com)


BUKKAKE BOYS:
Self-titled: LP
Straightforward fastcore from this Atlanta band that plays like you would expect from them at this point. It flows together as an album well and the songs are played at a pace that makes them seem like they may just all fall over on top of each other. They get compared a lot to Japanese hardcore, and I see a direct line between them and bands like Forward, but to me this sounds more like a heavier version of Californian hardcore from the ‘80s. It’s good to see the band finally holding their own on an LP after building a good reputation based on their live show and 7” outputs, and they churn out a few songs that are downright catchy in their frenzied pace. –Ian Wise (Sorry State, sorrystaterecords.com)


BRUISES, THE:
Never Be the Same: CD
It’s apparently official: “alternative” rock has replaced the mellow, doobie-friendly hippie-vibe singer/songwriter shit bands like the Eagles and their ilk foisted upon the world four decades ago. I guess, these days this slightly more sonically aggressive type of guitar-pop is, indeed, an alternative to the painful metal-rap wretchedness and faceless teen-pop twaddle saturating the modern music consciousness, but in the end it’s just as scrubbed clean of any potentially controversial edges as those other dominant genres and is perpetually putting on its cutesiest face just in case the majors come a-callin’ to strip mine an old format under the guise of fulfilling another set of antiquated dreams of superstardom. Here’s one more disc of would-be alt-rock hopefuls, squeaky clean and ready for their shot at the big time. In the end, I’m predicting they’ll at best be another obscure name on the soundtrack to an even obscurer teenybop flick with little more for their effort than a tale they can tell their grandchildren about the days when they were in the music biz. Long live (corporate) rock’n’roll. –jimmy (The Bruises, thebruises.com)


BROKEDOWNS, THE / WIDE ANGLES:
: Split 7”
New Brokedowns songs are always welcome in these parts. You gotta keep up with how they’re gonna turn the gruff punk genre on its head. Song structure? Fuck it. Who shackled us up in these verse / chorus / verse / bridge / double chorus chains anyways? I hear a new album is in the works, but until then check out the three tracks on this 7”. Innovative and catchy, like if D. Boone grew up listening to D4 and Tiltwheel. Wide Angles also know how to hold it down with honest, heartfelt melodic punk that pines but never whines. These songs leave you wanting more, which is good ‘cause it looks like they also have an LP coming out soon. –Daryl Gussin (Cassette Deck)


BLOWBACK:
Greed Runs the Clock: 7” EP
Remember hearing a prior release and not thinkin’ much either way about it. This, however, is an entirely different matter. Four tracks here of well-executed punk/hardcore that bounces from one tempo to the next and to the next in complex shifts while a singer makes astute observations about the state of American culture. At different times throughout, I’m hearin’ bits of Really Red, Articles Of Faith, and a few others buried in here and there. Kudos and backslaps all ‘round; good, good stuff. –jimmy (String Break, stringbreak.com)


BLOODLOSS:
Lost My Head for Drink: LP
According to the included info, this is apparently the heretofore unreleased final album by sorta supergroup comprised of members of Mudhoney, Lubricated Goat, and Monkeywrench, originally record in 1996 and left to rot until 2010. Given the personnel involved, I imagine it’d be a surprise to no one that the music here is bluesy, sludged-out stuff—albeit pristinely scrubbed of any excess sonic abrasiveness—that fits in many pigeonholes, yet comfortably in none: grunge, punk, sludge, noise rock, yes and no to all the above. Is it worth a listen? Yes, surprisingly. A thousand of ‘em out there, so start scramblin’. –jimmy (Dirty Knobby)


BLOCKHEAD:
Self-titled: Cassette
This tape contains a righteous slab of D.R.I.-inspired punk. Pissed, thrashy-sounding hardcore with Spike-like vocals. The band does not like cancer, hypocrites, or bullshit. There is a Blockhead theme song and a blank side so you can tape your favorite companion songs. Everything a demo needs. Definitely a good buy for your old school friends. –Billups Allen (Self-released)


BLAG’GARD:
Fresh Candy: CD
Sounds like half of Mission Of Burma, but i’d be hard-pressed to tell you exactly which half. Not sure why there’s a shapely orange-haired waif bare-ass naked save a strategically-placed Stratocaster on the cover, but i guess it all makes sense once you cop a squint at the band photo on the interior. BEST SONG: “Integrity” BEST SONG TITLE: “Candy Town” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Cover model has one orange fingernail and the rest just have blue ends. Yes, that is the best i could do. –norb (Pig Zen Space)


BLACK WINE:
Hollow Earth: LP
When Black Wine released their first LP it felt fresh and different, but still incredibly reminiscent of (for lack of a better word) early ‘90s college rock. But a couple years and a couple full-lengths later, all Black Wine remind me of is Black Wine. The multiple voices and songwriters have spawned a beautiful beast. Miranda can slow it all down without losing you, J can speed it up and keep it catchy, and Jeff nails it every time he gets the chance. A list of influences will only get you so far. Black Wine never turned back. Play this record for your friends are and see which ones are cool –Daryl Gussin (Don Giovanni)


BLACK FEET:
Back on This Road: 7” EP
A quintet of poppy-wavy-garagey Swedes with an all-boy rhythm section, a pair of female vocalists/guitarists, and a girl synth player to keep the damn rhythm section in their place. The two-girl vocal interplay adds a certain tuneful semi-gloss to the front end, the synth adds a precious whiff of space-age darkness, and the rhythm section just shuts the fuck up and does what they’re told. “Back On This Road” is a pretty darn good song, and “Show Me” ain’t half bad, either. The B-side, “Deny,” veers into 6/8 time and sounds more like something from the butt-end of some 1980 pseudo “new wave” album like Sue Saad & The Next or someone, thus excites me proportionately less. Definitely a keeper, although I’m not nuts about the band’s moniker, which reminds me of Sevrin’s acid-burned foot at the end of the “The Way To Eden” episode of Star Trek. BEST SONG: “Back On This Road” BEST SONG TITLE: “Deny,” if you’re The Clash FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: At sixty characters long, this is the longest digital download link with which i’ve ever been provided. –norb (Hard-On)


BLACK DOTS:
Again and Again: LP
When a baby’s born, I can’t help but think about the parents. Are they ready? Do they know what they’re getting into? Is that kid sorta fucked or sorta blessed? Same goes with bands where you already know their genealogy before the needle hits the groove. April Froschheuser was/is in Vena Cava. John was in The Achievement: two so-honest-it-aches bands that I’ve spent weeks-worth of spins listening to over the years. Black Dots sounds like a wise democracy that’s figured out its infrastructure before putting up flashing signage. Three principle songwriters. Two principle singers—vacillating between Florida ex-pat Wade and John—topically ranging from teenage depression-cutting to “the journey vs. the top of the mountain” headspace of an isolated band playing in Denver. In the background, on the blacktop in the distance, I hear Rumbleseat, Tim Version, long drives to find sympathetic souls, and small, semi-hidden tattoos being way more meaningful than sleeves of brightly-colored ink. Like little black dots. Worth seeking out. –todd (blackdotrock@gmail.com)


BIZARROS:
Complete Collection 1976-1980: 2 x LP
Like fellow Akronites Devo and the Rubber City Rebels, The Bizarros twisted and wrenched rock’n’roll’s standard conventions into all kinds of interesting, idiosyncratic directions. Operating during a time when the landscape of what was later called “punk” and “the new wave” was still very much open to new ideas and sounds, they melded together a potpourri of different influences both contemporary and from previous decades—traces of psychedelia, rock, the Voidoids, the Velvet Underground and, yes, even Devo can be found with a little scratching at the surface—to create a sound in step with the times, but still very much their own, and topped with a vocalist well aware that a snide sneer is often more effective than a shout. Collected here are assorted tracks from their sole album, singles, live recordings, and later demos for a never-to-be-recorded second album. Though some of this stuff was released on a major, Mercury, like so many bands that failed to safely fall within one of punk/new wave’s rapidly shrinking, ridiculously rigid pigeonholes, they quickly went the way of the dodo and have wallowed in the “who?” section of collector-geek limbo ever since. Hopefully, this collection will give ‘em a proper dusting off and place ‘em back on the shelf for those with the (in my opinion, proper) attitude that punk is about being different from the pack o’ punters to appreciate yet another group of, well, bizarros who weren’t afraid to dance to the beat of their own drum. –jimmy (Windian)


BITCH MAGNET:
Discography: 3 x CD
Another short-lived band with a long-felt influence, Bitch Magnet formed in the late ‘80s and released two LPs and an EP before parting ways in 1990. Its members went on to form Seam, Squirrel Bait, and to play in an array of other bands. Temporary Residence Ltd., has collected the band’s entire recorded history into a triple gatefold, triple CD set remastered for this release. Included here are the band’s three official releases, plus a number of rare and previously unreleased alternate versions. Musically, Bitch Magnet sound to me like the lost blueprints to much of the ‘90s rock that took both the underground and the mainstream by storm in that decade. They have rawness and grit—calling to mind noise rock and grunge—while also having a melodic, emotive quality that surely helped shape what became ‘90s emo. The tracks from their Star Booty 12”EP and the handful of alternate versions collected together on disc three of this set were my favorite tracks, but I found this entire discography to be totally enjoyable even after numerous listens. Bitch Magnet probably influenced every band you like, so do yourself a favor and check them out. You won’t be disappointed. –Paul J. Comeau (Temporary Residence, annapaz@temporaryresidence.com)


BANGERS / WHAT-A-NIGHTS:
: Split 7”
Two songs from each band here. Bangers: A three piece, featuring strong, somewhat gravelly vocals. The tunes are played at a comfortable, fairly easy pace. Good guitar work, backed up by a rhythm section that doesn’t slouch. In the liner notes, it says that these songs were recorded live. Unless there was no one there, I would say that it means the songs were recorded live in a studio, and not at a club. What-A-Nights: Four Japanese dudes playing upbeat punk songs. Nice guitar leads stand out on the B Side. The cover art features somewhat of a blob character coming after people. Good shit. –Nighthawk (Drunken Sailor / Snuffy Smiles, DrunkenSailorRecords.co.uk)


BAD COYOTES:
Self-titled: 7”
Dudes wearing leather jackets. Everybody changing their last name to the name of the band. (In this case just “Coyote.” I’m assuming for brevity’s sake. “Bad Coyote” would be a stupid-ass fake last name.) I’m guessin’ before I even throw this thing on the turntable, that this is gonna be a little bit Ramones-influenced. Really it’s more like blues-influenced oldies turned up to eleven and played kinda shitty. (Or, uh, “lo-fi.” Whichever.) Sometimes it sounds like a bad Misfits bootleg. Not all that great –Ryan Horky (Eli’s Mile High, elismilehigh.com)


BAD BEACH:
Seasick: 2 x CD
This is a compilation of two full lengths and an assortment of demos from this late ‘80s British punk/post-punk band I had never heard of until now. The LPs presented here, 1987’s Cornucopia and 1988’s Cut It Off, present a band going full-on deathrock. It’s like a British Dance with Me-era T.S.O.L., cross pollinated with a bit of early Christian Death, a bit of d-beat, and Dave Vanian at his most melodramatic and gothic. Seriously, if I ever heard the opening track from Cornucopia, “Morgan Le Fey,” somewhere, I would assume it was from one of those middle period Damned albums. While taken in one sitting—especially with the bonus tracks included with this, the albums can be a bit on the long side—they are both incredibly solid albums. Both albums do break up the more straightforward, echoey, bass and drum-heavy goth punk tracks with songs such as the ethereal interlude of “Blind Fate” on the first album and the oddly folky opening track “Cut It Off (Pt. 1)” from the second album. There was even a flute somewhere on that second disc. Lyrically, this makes me think of the early Rudimentary Peni EPs with their shift between political concerns and more personal or esoteric concerns, such as love and death and puppy killers. The demos on the first disc are your standard rougher versions of the stuff on the LP. The BadBeach Trio—Sonic Sunset demo from the second disc is a bit different because it’s from 1995, a full seven years after the second LP, and consists of songs featuring a heavy female vocal presence. All in all, this is a very solid re-release of some excellent tunes I had never heard of before, and I’m sure anybody into all those punk/post/dark/goth wave DJ nights which apparently happen like ten times a night, at least here in L.A., will find this worth well tracking down. –Adrian Salas (Boss Tuneage, bosstuneage.com)


BABY TEARS:
Rusty Years: LP
Three songs into this, something sounded off. Suddenly I realized that I just may have been listening to this at the wrong speed. D’oh! At 45 RPM, this record was highly intriguing and came across like a mash-up of the Lost Sounds and Xbxrx. At 33 RPM, which I’m assuming is the intended speed, this sounds more like Francis Harold And The Holograms style noise-punk and, sometimes, like an even more unconventional Birthday Party. The lo-fi recording and the silk screened album cover convince me that this is indeed a DIY product and not just some hipster douche’s self wank fest. It’s an interesting listen, for sure. I just wish it was meant to be played at 45. –Juan Espinosa (Rainy Road, Doom Town)


ARMADA, LA:
Self-titled: LP
Lyrically I’m totally onboard with this—barbs about the shittier aspects of the modern world, including enslavement via debt, the reinterpretation of the term “organic food,” the failure of capitalism, resisting the system, etc. Musically, however, I’ve just never been all that impressed with “hardcore” metal—as that term is used these days—and the genre really does zippo for me. Here’s hoping that the seeds buried in the lyrics take root in at least a couple o’ fans who do dig that sound, ‘cause, frankly, they sure as shit ain’t gonna hear about stuff like this in the mainstream media or on the current hit program on Telemundo or TV Azteca. –jimmy (Fat Sandwich)


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