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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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PRETTY BOY THORSON AND LIL’ HAPPINESS:
“You’re Gonna Miss Me” b/w “Way Out”: 7”
There is no insert with this, and there is no label on the vinyl (which is transparent gold). The song titles are etched into each side. That’s the only way to know which song you’re playing. That, or the fact that Jesse sings the one on Side A, and Annie (from The Soviettes) sings the one on Side B. Lots of detective work is necessary here. The cover photo would have you assume that there are five people in this outfit; Jesse, who is an asshole (or at least that’s what a shirt that I have says), Annie, who is cool, Paddy Costello, who is cool, and two other dudes who look familiar. Both songs are about people leaving each other. The band features a full, laid-back sound on these catchy tunes. The music definitely makes up for the lack of information here. –Nighthawk (Rad Girlfriend, radgirlfriendrecords.com)


PRAYER BREAKFAST:
Family Business: CD / Cassette
While their first gig may have been opening for the Spin Doctors, Bloomington’s Prayer Breakfast sounds nothing like them. Instead, with a sound more reminiscent of acts such as mid-‘90s Sunny Day Real Estate, Guided By Voices, and Jetenderpaul (I know no one knows who this is, but I’m going to keep referring to them in reviews), Prayer Breakfast creates songs with lo-fi influences and solid build-ups and explosions. The addition of the occasional twangy guitar, keys, and harmonica round out the sound of Family Business, giving it some depth and variety, making for a fuller, richer sound. Overall, there are some nice, summery tunes on the album (see especially “Clover Crowns”), making for a positive listen. I know it’s primarily because it’s influenced by so many great bands from the ‘90s (when I was in high school and college), but Family Business is definitely one of the better albums I’ve heard in a long time. –kurt (XRA / Flannelgraph)


POTTY MOUTH:
Sun Damage: 7”
When I was a teenager, though I never fully immersed myself in the K Records and Kill Rock Stars catalogs outside of the obvious stuff like Beat Happening, Bikini Kill, and Bratmobile, I had a few compilation CDs that I loved. This stuff kind reminds me of a lot of those songs: jangly and kind of spacey pop songs with a hard edge. Really cool stuff! Also, did they take their name from the first Bratmobile record? I sure hope they did! –Chris Mason (Puzzle Pieces / Ride The Snake / Feeble Minds)


POST TEENS:
The Heat: 7” EP
Goddamn, this is great! Six tunes of superbly performed mid-paced punk that packs quite a punch from beginning to end. It reminds me so much of the noisier Marked Men jams, but with just enough of their own touch to make their songs shine on their own. These boys be straight outta Gainesville, which means yes on the beards but no on the country/southern influence. Do yourself a favor. –Juan Espinosa (No Idea)


POISON IDEA:
The Fatal Erection Years 1983-1986: LP
Early Poison Idea is pretty damn near unimpeachable in my book, so if you’re new to Portland negativity or don’t have five hundred or more bucks laying around to get the Pick Your King 7” or Record Collectors Are Pretentious Assholes EPs, TKO’s done a nice service for you. Sounds great, looks great. Live and comp. tracks are pulled in to fill out both sides of a long-player. There’s honor in keeping the legacy alive. What’s new and interesting are Jerry A.’s liner notes. They clear some things up. He admits to PI being a product of their environment, that they were drawn into the most negative aspects of L.A. punk—both the music and the people—and that they tried to outdo their contemporaries. Basically, outpunk the punks. It’s an honest reaction. It explains both what makes Poison Idea’s music so believable: their rage, their damage, their directness. They were fucked up kids who became fucked up adults playing ugly (a compliment) music. It also admits one of the great shames of the first wave of hardcore, where Jerry reconciles that “being creative, smart, and having any kind of sympathy toward your fellow man was not allowed.” –todd (TKO)


PLASTIC CROSS:
Grayscale Rainbows: LP
Huh. One half of The Measure (SA) and a few other guys trying their hands at hardcore punk. If you can get past the album artwork, there’s some pretty good material here. (Craig Fu Yong, you are a pretty good vocalist and your lyrics aren’t half bad either—they’re actually really good—but this cover and such? Eeeek.) A little burly, a little frantic, a lot of songs—and a lot of thinking around corners and dodging the obvious. The dichotomy here: Grayscale Rainbows is full of traditional hardcore, but with an aversion to traditional verse-verse-chorus solutions; it’s hardcore full of little flourishes, little blips and bleeps that add depth and strength. Eighteen songs. I’m not much of a fan of hardcore these days, but Plastic Cross more than held my interest. Quality. –keith (Don Giovanni)


PLANKS:
Funeral Mouth: LP
Historically, the Germans have done chaotic, melodic hardcore on a level that other folks can only aspire to. A perusal of the Per Koro discography will quickly confirm this fact. And on their third LP, Mannheim’s Planks not only carry on the tradition of brilliant German hardcore, but continue to build on their incredibly solid foundation by incorporating more elements of modern black metal, atmospheric sludge, and somber instrumental passages that fuse perfectly to create what will no doubt be hailed a high point of the genre. Phenomenal. –Dave Williams (Golden Antenna, goldenantenna.com)


PEEPLE WATCHING:
Demo: 7”
This demo (in tape form) has been around for a while, but I’m really glad Nervous Nelly had the good sense to put this out on a 7”. Not a lot of demos deserve a “proper” release, but this is one of the exceptions. Peeple Watching is the new band from Zack of The Credentials and picks up right where his old band left off: scrappy and passionate DIY punk rock for fans of ‘90s Bay Area punk and Boston stuff like Witches With Dicks and Awful Man. I’ve said this in past reviews of his other band, but it seems with every release he’s a part of the songs get better and more memorable, and this release is no exception. Looking forward hearing more from these guys, for sure! –Chris Mason (Nervous Nelly, nervousnelly.tumblr.com)


PANIC BEATS, THE:
…Strike Again: LP
I’m not sure when the pop punk community collectively thought that writing nothing but creepy stalker songs over Ramones song structures was the way to push the genre forward (The Creeps, Masked Intruder), but this is starting to go from a few gimmick bands to a legitimate subgenre and that’s weird. What really put me off about this record are the vocals. They come off sounding like the Dopamines if their singers had an incredibly weak grasp of melody. I wanted to like this, but there wasn’t enough to really grab onto. –Bryan Static (Night Fighter, nightfighterrecords.com)


OVERNIGHT LOWS, THE:
“Cones and Rods”b/w “Shouldn’t Say It”: 7”
The Overnight Lows continue to blaze with this two song offering. The trio play Dangerhouse-paced punk with a rock and roll twist. Snotty male and female tradeoff vocals over raw riffage. Plus you have to think about what they are saying once in a while. Quality punk all around. Most essential. –Billups Allen (Blahll!)


OCCULT DETECTIVE CLUB:
Alright Gentlemen: 7”
A while back, I got an amazing 7” by Hex Dispensers with a ripping B-side called “I’m a Ghost.” I played that song over and over again before realizing that on the record, it said the song was written by a band called Occult Detective Club. It took a while, but I tracked them down. Another amazing band from Denton, Texas? Not surprising. Well after two LPs, the ODC are back with a brand new 7” and I couldn’t be happier. Four blasts of muscular pop that forces you to bounce in your shoes uncontrollably. The hooks will stay with you forever and will have you singing at the top of your lungs in the car uncaringly. Four songs that instantly bring me back to seeing them live at Awesome Fest and have me longing for more. This band is that good. This record is that good. Pick this up. Pick it all up. –ty (Dirt Cult)


OBNOX:
I’m Bleeding Now: LP
I didn’t even need to check on the location of this one-man freakshow. Middle America? Bingo. This dude has done time in This Moment In Black History and the Puffy Areolas, but this is a different beast altogether. Straddling the line between straight-up noise and the rock’n’roll, like Iggy played back in the day. Swirling noise, yelping vocals, and everything up to eleven. Bastard child of the Clone Defects gone noise…. The soundtrack to Cleveland 2012. This shit is too much for me; I must be getting soft. –Tim Brooks (12Xu)


NUBS, THE:
“I Don’t Need You” b/w “Dogs”: 7”
As far as i can tell, Last Laugh is sort of the silver to Sing Sing’s gold standard with regards to obscure ‘70s punk reissuist labels; this might be damning them with faint praise considering that i can’t really think of a legit contender for the bronze, but i’m sure they’ll get over it. Originally released in 1979, “I Don’t Need You” is a decent KBD-style punker with Norelco® shaver guitars and rubber band bass—not quite the next “Just Head” or “Bummer Bitch,” but decent enough to merit preservation. I’m actually more taken with “Dogs,” the quirkier flipside about a human who thinks he’s a pooch, which sounds like Syd Barrett fronting the Snivelling Shits or something. Why Syd Barrett be fronting is anybody’s guess. BEST SONG: “Dogs” BEST SONG TITLE: “I Don’t Need You” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Recorded at the same New Hampshire studio which would later beget those early GG Allin recordings! TASTE THE IMPENDING GLORY OF “1980’s ROCK & ROLL!!!” –norb (Last Laugh)


NOUN:
Self-titled: 7”
Apparently, I’m a little out of the loop on this band. This is Screaming Females frontperson Marissa Paternoster’s solo project and they have two full lengths that I have never heard. If I were to take a stab at giving this a genre tag, I’d go with stoner space pop, but even that doesn’t quite cover it. It’s reverby, guitar-driven rock of some variety, but the definitions become vague and blurred as this record keeps spinning. It is definitely a noun of some sort. Huh. Clever name. Usually, the problem with these records is how lost the songs seems to get, but Noun is smarter than that. The trail is rocky and rough, but any distractions to the journey are brief and concise. I recommend this record. Save this one for a night with the stars. –Bryan Static (Don Giovanni, dongiovannirecords.com)


NOTHING:
Double Dose of Negativity: LP
Speedy and tightly wound hardcore from the Berlin outfit. I get the sense they schooled themselves on the 1988-1995 era of straight edge, as there are some similarities here. But they are definitely grounded in the modern times, as the energy is genuine. There’s also a slight hard rock angle to their sound as well, much like the Victims (Sweden). The songs have a nice way of being able to have a catchy rhythm and still have the speedy thing happening. The title track really stands apart from the rest on here with a middle part that slows down; the guitar comes in providing some mood and the vocals talk more than shout. Then you have some ragers like “Nothing’s Alright,” “Living Under Lies,” and “Everything Is Wrong.” All of them that have this urgency through time changes and the ability to put a little more on the table than shouting and racing through the song. Even the song “Old” does a great job of capturing that shitty feeling of trying to find your way and place in something that starts to feel alien to you from all the changes over the years. Believe me, I know, and can relate. –Matt Average (Refuse, refuserecords.prv.pl / refuserecords@gmail.com)


NONA / PEOPLE WATCHIN’:
: Split 7”
(Disclaimer: On the front of this record, written in Sharpie, reads “ex-Credentials and member of Spraynard,” which is now ex-Spraynard, I guess. I have no idea which band they’re talking about. Maybe both? My money’s on People Watchin’.) Nona: Shang-A-Lang meets Good Luck if it was sung by Kim Shattuck from The Muffs. It’s fan-fucking-tastic. Catchy in the Ergs kind of way, where the parts of the song aren’t repeated ad infinitum and the variety in any given song is impressive. For a band that only has this plus a demo EP floating around, this is remarkable. I’ll be keeping a close eye on them over the coming years. People Watchin’: Ah, Rivethead, I hear you so often it seems almost impossible that you only put out two EPs. You can probably guess that this is growly, fast pop punk. The songs grab a tempo and stick to it with solid guitar work carrying the band’s sound. What a beautiful release, highly recommended. –Bryan Static (Get Better, getbentrecordsnh.limitedrun.com / My Parents / Behind Punk / Square Of Opposition, squareofopposition.com)


NOITUUS:
Self-titled: 7”EP
Lärm moves to Finland and ditches the youth crew for crust and d-beat. This is so fucking out of control that it evokes images of the guitarist’s cabs shooting sparks and melting their input cords. Pissed-as-fuck and about as easy to listen to as the sound of an exploding toilet on a loop, fans of Nerveskade take notice; this is the stuff tuneless distort-core dreams are made of. –Juan Espinosa (Illegal / Punk In Lapland / Distroy Everything, noituus.moga@gmail.com)


NOFX:
Self/Entitled: CD
I came to NOFX’s new full length with minimal expectations but came away pleasantly surprised. This is probably one of the most, if not the most, consistent NOFX releases I have heard. I like NOFX. I think “Linoleum” is one of the best punk songs ever, and have caught them live more than a few times, but when it comes to their albums, even my favorites such as Punk in Drublic and The War on Errorism have songs on them that I have to skip or do my best to ignore (I’m thinking of you “My Heart Is Yearning” and “Anarchy Camp”). Not so with Self/Entitled. The closest to a weak spot is “Xmas Has Been X’ed” but being the last track, it isn’t really much of an issue, and, all said, it is an okay song. “72 Hookers,” which starts the album, features Fat Mike’s perhaps debatable take on Middle East foreign policy in regards to jihadists, but also has a classic-sounding skate punk opening riff, up there with “The Separation of Church and Skate.” A particular highlight is “She Didn’t Lose Her Baby,” which plays like the even darker companion piece to White Trash ‘s... “She’s Gone” taken from the side of an addict mother. Fat Mike really shines on songs like these because he can frame effectively empathetic character studies of people who are not necessarily characters deserving of sympathy, but of some understanding. The same goes for the short “I, Fatty” which appears to be based on Jerry Stahl’s engrossing fictionalized autobiography of Fatty Arbuckle of the same name. One of my problems with Wolves in Wolves’ Clothing and Cokie the Clown were the way the albums’ more personal tracks reveled so heavily in Fat Mike’s self destructive behavior to the point of seeming contemptuous of both those close to him and his fans. Thankfully, there are now songs that seem to reflect a sort of maturation in acknowledging consequences to these actions. “Cell Out” is a narrative song detailing an ill-fated trip to a bar and having an uncomfortable “you can never go back” moment with a hardline former fan who accuses the narrator of selling out. What is perhaps the centerpiece of the album is “I’ve Got One Jealous Again, Again” (the sequel to the much more optimistic “We’ve Got Two Jealous Agains”) which deconstructs Fat Mike’s divorce through the lens of a lifelong dedicated punk fan and record collector. It peels back the sarcasm and eternal adolescence that many assign as NOFX’s modus operandi, to examine a failed adult relationship in a very concise and affecting manner. It may not be emo, but the bit of honesty really does a lot to help NOFX craft an album capable of standing next to many of their stronger works, which is impressive after a career this long. –Adrian Salas (Fat)


NO TOMORROW BOYS:
Animal Eyes: 7”
New band from Matt Mayhem from the sorely missed and amazing punk band Young People With Faces. This band is quite different sounding, coming on like a ‘90s release on Crypt Records. Falling somewhere between say, the Revelators, and the Devil Dogs, No Tomorrow Boys dole out lo-fi garage trash in spades. –frame (Rapid Pulse)


NERVEBREAKERS:
Hijack the Radio!: CD
A collection of rare recordings by a Texas band famous for two things: 1.) They opened a gig for the Sex Pistols during the latter’s infamous and ill-fated U.S. tour; 2) The song “My Girlfriend Is a Rock,” which was a minor hit and has been subsequently covered by no less than the Angry Samoans. Collected here are a number of choice tracks spanning 1975-‘79, culled from assorted releases, demos, and recording sessions. Sound quality is top notch and the songs are fuggin’ aces, bucko. Highly recommended for both the completest and the casual punker fan. –jimmy (Get Hip)


NEIGHBORHOOD BRATS:
Ocean Beach Party: 7”
Razorcake #66’s cover band continues to prove why Neighborhood Brats are currently one of the best no-qualifier, no-additional-adjectives-needed punk bands on the West Coast. Raw melody. Buzzy, bucking guitar work. Rampart-and-heartbeat strong bass. Forced marching to bad places drumming. Post-apocalyptic beach party music. “No sun, no tan.” Live, they pantsed a room full of unsuspecting Awesome Festers. It was like watching an above-ground nuclear testing documentary. Rad. –todd (Falsified)


NEIGHBORHOOD BRATS:
Ocean Beach Party: 7”
This time, Neighborhood Brats are taking it to the beach with this two-song blast that is liable to give you a coronary. It’s not a trip to the beach that’s all happy and fun. No, this is filled with rain and clouds and blood and zombie sharks. A real beach party! This band can do no wrong. As with their previous releases, the songs, the energy, the tempo—everything is perfect. More, more, more! –ty (Falsified)


NASTY, THE:
Murder Mask: CD
Super fast and screamy thrash punk. Awesome! This CD has five songs in five minutes, and no lyrics sheet. When you put out a full length, send it this way! –Lauren Trout (P.I.G.))


NARCS, THE:
Long Hot Summer: EP
Excellent follow up to their previous EP on Reel Time, I Want Dope I Want Pussy I Want All That Shit. In fact, this record surpasses that record, and it was no sloucher. They ratcheted up the energy here to something a bit more on edge and almost reckless. Punk that lives up to its name: dirty, raw, rough, and all with a sense of something fucked could very well happen. I mean, fuck, this band is made up of some historical figures: Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglas, and flugelhorn master Chuck Mangione. So you know something epic is just around the corner. An American band, if there ever was! The title track is a rager with a short little guitar noodle to add a little unease to the deal. It’s the song “Ratbone” though that really connects. Short and urgent! Also, “R.O.T. Blood,” which has a sense of coming together at the recording studio with the weird ending, like, is that it? I guess so! I imagine their live shows in a room of cigarette smoke, leather jackets permeating years of poor hygiene, cheap beer, and a few participants who can’t keep their shit together. The Narcs... there is no other. –Matt Average (Cowabunga, cowabungarecords.com)


MOSS ICON:
Discography: 2 x CD
Often cited as an influence on both the post-hardcore and emo genres, Moss Icon had a brief life in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s. Main guitarist Tonie Joy went on to co-found Universal Order Of Armageddon and play briefly in Born Against. The band has popped up here and there sporadically over the years since, but remained obscure to all but the most dedicated fans of their music, thanks to their original recordings being all long out of print. Now thanks to Temporary Residence Ltd., Moss Icon’s complete discography is available once again in a two CD set jam packed with lyrics, live photos, and original album art. Beyond the beautiful packaging is the music itself, which thrashes back and forth between raging walls of sound and quiet, meandering parts. Vocalist Jonathan Vance’s alternating spoken word style of singing and enraged shouting carries his poetic, almost stream of consciousness lyrics throughout. There’s a very emotionally charged feeling on many of these recordings—a sort of melancholy mixed with barely repressed rage—a feeling heightened by the rise and fall from loud to quiet parts. The intensity this creates makes for some damn catchy music. I’ve had this in heavy rotation and don’t see myself tiring of it anytime soon. It’s a highly enjoyable and highly recommended reissue. –Paul J. Comeau (Temporary Residence, annapaz@temporaryresidence.com)


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