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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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JJ AND THE REAL JERKS:
Economy Class Ego Trip: LP
Finally a 12” record from this fantastic Los Angeles band! More of their killer punk rock’n’roll that fans of the Humpers / Lazy Cowgirls / Dragons / Joneses will wanna be all over. I am fairly surprised to find that in this day and age L.A. has most of the very best rock’n’roll bands on the planet. Between Pat Todd and the Rank Outsiders, the Hangmen, Simon Stokes, The Blessings, and JJ And The Real Jerks, that city is just killing it on the real rock’n’roll front. Gonna need to make it out there to see a few of these bands share a bill as soon as I possibly can. –frame (RankOutsider, rankoutsiderrecords.com)


JEFFREY NOVAK:
Baron in the Trees: LP
By my count, this is Jeffrey Novak’s third solo record. Novak’s solo recordings are different than his Cheap Time albums. The solo stuff—and Baron in the Trees is no exception—has a heavy Canterbury Scene and Ray Davies influence. It’s a rich record on a budget (part of it was recorded at Jay Reatard’s house three years ago). A lot of thought was put into the arrangements (including a cello). Novak’s lyrics, at times, have a real playfulness/storybook quality to them that evoke Syd Barrett’s work. Baron in the Trees isn’t a record that fully reveals itself on first listen. I can already tell that—like Kevin Ayers’ work—this record will continue to appeal to me for different reasons for some time to come. My only complaint is the album’s a bit short—the B side is about twelve minutes. Brevity aside, Baron in the Trees is a solid record (with great cover art to boot). –ryan (In The Red, intheredrecords.com)


INTERNATIONAL SWINGERS, THE:
Self-titled: CDEP
A new supergroup has touched down to rock the world! Gary Twinn (Supernaut) on vocals. James Stevenson (Chelsea, Generation X) on guitar. Clem Burke (Blondie, The Romantics) on drums. Glen Matlock on bass. If I have to tell you what bands Matlock was in, then you’re not welcome at my house! Most of the tunes here are written by Twinn, except “Honey’s Room,” which he co-wrote with Stevenson. There’s one cover here—”Friday on My Mind”—by The Easybeats. But the originals stand out from the pack. Great arrangements, solid playing from all involved, and catchy melodies make this EP a must-have. My only complaint is it’s too damn short. So get cracking on a full record and bring the rawk to a U.S. tour soon! –koepenick (Self-released, photodol@aol.com)


INDIAN WARS:
Songs from the North: LP
Indian Wars play loose, garagey country rock that sounds like a rootsier Black Lips. There’s a nice crunch of electric guitar, touches of harmonica and keys, a twang that’s never exaggerated, and a vaguely ominous psychedelia. This record reminds me of a road trip I took through the North Carolina mountains. My friend Steve had me hold the wheel of his truck while he rolled a joint, and things got weirder and weirder until the night ended in a karaoke bar with people signing me, the only black guy, up to do rap songs and these middle aged swingers trying to take me home. So, play this record when you get that wild look in your eyes. Then play it again when things take a turn for the bizarre. It’ll still make sense. Band photo references “Ragged Glory” by Neil Young and the band name references… Native American genocide at the hands of European settlers. Hmm. –CT Terry (Bachelor)


INCREDIBLE KIDDA BAND, THE:
“Bitch!” b/w “She’s a 50”: 7”
Los Angeles had the Nerves. Nuneaton, U.K. had The Incredible Kidda Band. The Incredible Kidda Band formed in ‘76 and their first single was in ‘78. Both the Nerves and Kidda were hard-working, slightly-in-the-wrong-place and/or slightly-at-the-wrong-time powerpop bands that were able to conjoin the strut and confidence of glam with the catchiness and stripped-down focus of new wave. They avoid the endless-songs-are-our-thing mistake of the Grateful Dead and weren’t Punk (capital P, in the 1977 sense of the word). The similarities between the two bands are striking. Both were surrounded by fellow bands (on tours, on labels, or management), who became famous or were already famous. Blondie covered the Nerves “Hangin’ on the Telephone” on Parallel Lines. Most people still think it’s a Blondie song. Kidda recorded with a guy who was in the Animals and was Jimi Hendrix’s manager. They supported the Troggs and The Beat. (The English one, not the one that emerged from the dissolution of The Nerves.) Both bands were poised and positioned for a hit on the charts. It never came. It took people thirty, thirty-five years to come around. (That, and their singles selling for around a thousand bucks.) Kidda’s posthumous debut album, Too Much Too Little Too Late, was released in 2000 was a collection of twenty-nine songs—studio and demo recordings, much like The Nerves’ One Way Ticket in 2008 on Alive. I have no idea where these two songs fit into their timeline. I’m just glad that they’re out and are currently available at a reasonable price. –todd (Last Laugh, lastlaughrecords.us)


IN DEFENCE:
Into the Sewer: CD
From what I gather, this is their second LP recorded back in 2009, with a couple EPs (their splits with Party By The Slice and Mother Speed), and some extra unreleased stuff. I do like this band, and I must say I tend to shun hardcore bands with humorous lyrics because they usually suck and are only as interesting as their gimmick, which is entertaining for about five minutes. However, In Defence have the music to back them up, and the vocal delivery is pretty damn good as well. Yes, the songs are fun and goofy in their way, but they do make points. It is a far more effective way of reaching people than a guilt trip dished out by the far less clever bands out there. Most of the songs here tend to deal with punk scene issues, such as people thinking they shouldn’t have to pay to see bands, filthy punk houses, and the stupidity of ‘80s dance parties. Some are inside jokes, like “A Song for Mark Nelson,” “Ben Crew Is an Asshole,” and a few others. But whatever. I’m bowled over by the burly NYHC style they crank out (and they’re from Minneapolis!), and how they deliver it with a definite intensity. I should have made the drive down to Santa Ana when they were here recently... –Matt Average (Profane Existence, profaneexistence.com)


ILSA:
Intoxicantations: LP
Jeezum crud. This is some seriously downtuned shit. My typical issue with bands who fall under the “sludge” umbrella is the lack audible melody and riffery, but Ilsa certainly sidesteps that pitfall. I don’t even have a comparable reference for this record. Think Disembodied-esque tones, but more eeevilll sounding. As with much of A389’s catalog, there are Holy Terror moments, but at a snail’s pace that harkens Mosquito Control-era Isis and even Bloodlet at times. Regardless, this is an insanely heavy, dark, venomous record that should appeal to both hardcore and sludge/doom aficionados. –Dave Williams (A389)


ICON GALLERY:
Valiance: 7”
Either punks who’ve listened to too much Iron Maiden, or dirtheads who haven’t listened to enough punk. A wee bit too hair-farmer for moi. –jimmy (Solar Funeral)


HORNY WACKERS:
They Are Savage!: LP
Psychobilly as a genre has a negative connotation to me because—and I’d like to make it clear that this is likely just a prejudice of mine—it’s one of those styles of music that everyone feels they can pull off, for some reason. Everything about this record bothered me before I put it on. Silly nicknames and corpse paint doesn’t read well with me. I’ve seen a lot of bonehead rockabilly acts spitting bad Gene Vincent impressions while their guitars echo out of control, thinking they’re dead interesting because they suggest the dichotomy of man by having a Ronald Reagan haircut and mom’s old Halloween skull glued to their amps. But despite the facade, this three piece can actually play. Not only do they do the overdriven rock riffs to a Bo Diddley beat that is easily mastered by jocks and creeps, but the guitarist plays well without a drowning echo on his guitar. They pull of some genuinely good roots-sounding songs and have a tasteful mix of overdriven fuzz songs mixed in for fun. Another big pitfall for a psychobilly band is the inevitable affected-sounding singer. The singer for the Horny Wackers has a natural grip on the inflections and spirit of good rockabilly vocals. I like this record. If you’re into the genre, this is an above average outfit. –Billups Allen (Dead Beat)


HELLKITE:
Fun Kite: CD
Feral, mostly mid-tempo hardcore that sounds like it was either birthed in some early-’80s Midwestern hellhole or crawled out of San Francisco’s legendary Vats. They keep things simple and abrasive, with guitars a-buzzin’, vocals a-shoutin’, and song titles serving as the sole line of their respective choruses. Effectively executed and delivered with conviction. –jimmy (Hellkite, hellkitefunkite@gmail.com)


HEAT DUST:
Self-titled: 10”
When I made my Mansa Musa-esque pilgrimage to Razorcake HQ last year, I told Todd that there needs to be a name for the Dinosaur Jr. punk that’s been coming out lately. He said something like, “To name a style of art is to kill it,” and I shut up, because I like grunge. Well, I’m back and I’m calling this stuff “Dino-Punk” because I’m sick of it and it needs to die. Go away, lackadaisical vocal echoes, vague lyrics, buzzy guitars, and slow songs. You’ve had your time. Twice. What makes Heat Dust stand out? They’re from New Orleans, the guitar sounds more like a mosquito than a drill, they have a song called “Priority Mail for an Asshole,” and sometimes they really slow it down, for maximum depressive effect. –CT Terry (Texas Is Funny)


HEART ATTACK ALLEY:
Living in Hell: CD
Given that it’s on Voodoo Rhythm Records, would you believe that this is bluesy garage stomp? That is the modus operandi of this label and they are heads and tails above most releasing this kinda stuff. This record is no change and is quite good; a real stomper from this New Zealand band. Any fan of the majority of the stuff in the Crypt catalog that is not familiar with this label will wanna check out both Voodoo Rhythm and Heart Attack Alley. –frame (Voodoo Rhythm, voodoorhythm.com)


HALF RATS, THE:
Self-titled: Cassette
I’ve bought another cassette. Hell has frozen over! I had to make an exception for The Half Rats, one of the best Midwestern bands of the past couple of years. They’re a crossbreed of Chicago, IL and Lafayette, IN (singer/guitar and drummer based out of Chi, other singer/guitar, bass, keys from Lafayette). I don’t know what it is, but Lafayette bands have a thing for long distance relationships. ‘60s-influenced rock’n’roll played by regular guys who don’t feel the need to dress the clownish “Paisley Underground” part. Recorded by Jim Diamond at Ghetto Recorders, but lacking the drum tone and overall oomph I hear and feel in many of his recordings. I don’t know how active The Half Rats are these days, though. Catch ‘em live and try not to dance! Hopefully this comes out on vinyl soon. –Sal Lucci (Burger)


GOOGOLPLEXIA / BUTT:
Ass-Sick Creeps: Split 7”
Side A is a song called “Butt Release.” The lyrics are about the band on Side B. They go to jail, but are then released. Get it? It’s an up-tempo, toe tapper that you can dance to. Instruments played by Googolplexia include banjo and accordion. There’s even whistling! Mario Seaweed from Butt lends a hand on guitar and drums. Side B is a song called “Ass Disaster.” It’s a slower tune, driven by drums. Both female and male vocals tell the tale of the Pancake Master getting involved with donkeys (asses). Very humorous yarn. The end of each song flows into the beginning of the other song before being cut off. The never-ending flow probably sounds better on the MP3 version, which is downloadable. The cover art on each side is colored embroidery, done by Fishboy. In place of a lyric sheet, you get a comic interpretation for each song, drawn by Matt Harnish. Very well put together and well worth the price, whatever that is. –Nighthawk (Pancake Productions, pancakeproductions.net)


GENTLEMEN OF HORROR:
Live in Kelowna!: EP
Obscure Canadian punk from the early 1980s. From the information on the inside sleeve, they were a short-lived band, released one EP in their time, played some shows, pissed off the locals, and then disappeared. This record is two live recordings from 1981 and 1982. The quality is raw and unpolished, but it definitely captures the spirit of the time. Between songs, you can hear the audience yelling at the band, as well a the vocalist berating the city they live in and religion, as they tear into one song after the other before eventually being shut down. The songs are pretty good blasts of hardcore punk, and there’s definitely the spirit needed to make it work. The 1982 recording, “Crime Watch / Block Parents” has a much rawer sound, almost like Disorder. Pretty damn good! How about reissuing the first EP? –Matt Average (Punk, punkrecords.com)


GAY KISS:
Fault: LP
At their core (no pun intended), these guys are a hardcore act, but they approach it from such an atonal angle that what results is mid-tempo thrash that’d likely appeal to the average noise rock enthusiast as well. I’m concerned the singer’s gonna get throat polyps long before he reaches his next birthday. –jimmy (Anxiety Machine, anxietymachinerecords.com)


GANGABANG GORDON:
I’m Not a Musician: Cassette
The title is right on. Whoever is playing this garbage is not a musician. This is just dumb noise. I never understood the whole, “Let’s make stupid, shitty music, get it?” No, I don’t get it. What a fucking waste of a cassette. This release really brought Burger down a notch in my book. I just can’t imagine the reasoning behind this crap’s existence. I am honestly upset at having received this. Not everything that gets recorded deserves to be released, but hey, it’s their money. Too bad plastic isn’t biodegradable. –Rene Navarro (Burger, burgerrecords@gmail.com)


GALLOWS:
Self-titled: CD
This self-titled record is Gallows’ first full-length effort with former Alexisonfire vocalist Wade MacNeil fronting the band. It’s a follow-up to their 2011 EP Death Is Birth, which introduced MacNeil to the fold following the departure of original vocalist Frank Carter over creative differences. The self-titled record marks a turning point for a new chapter in the story of Gallows. I understand wanting to close a past chapter on a band’s history to continue to move forward, but I don’t know if Gallows is a step forward for the band as much as a lateral move, a reinvention. The album opens with a spoken word intro before thundering to life with the first track “Victim Culture.” What’s immediately apparent in this first track is that there are new things going on with the band since their last full length, 2009s Grey Britain than just a new vocalist. The band’s songwriting has also taken a new turn, with a much more rock’n’roll vibe, and some of the catchiest riffs they’ve yet written. Judging this album on riffs and songwriting, I’d consider it a stellar achievement, and the best album in the band’s catalogue. Tracks like “Vapid Adolescent Blues,” highlight for me the pinnacle of both catchy guitar riffs, and songwriting structure, something many bands can’t pull off doing both of at the same time. It makes the squealing leads and epic crew vocals in the background at various points that much more intense and enjoyable. “Vapid Adolescent Blues,” is the kind of song you’d expect kids to go nuts for live, and it’s followed by the ripper “Austere,” which blazes flaming riffs into your ears from start to finish. As much as I loved this album musically, I was not enamored with their new vocalist. As angry and aggressive as he sounds on every track, MacNeil lacks the dynamism of former frontman Carter and the charismatic grit of his delivery. Even after multiple listens, raging along to the music, I could not get into his voice. While a weak vocal performance keeps this album from firing on all cylinders, holding it back from otherwise being one of my favorite albums of the year, it’s still worth a solid listen. Longtime fans are sure to feel divided on this record, as I was, but should give it a chance before dismissing it. –Paul J. Comeau (Bridge Nine)


FLIP SHIT:
Outgoing Rockers: 7”
From the cover and layout, I was prepared for some serious Dee-troit MC5/Stooges worship from this band. Instead, this record contains some of the best Bad Posture/Nihilistics-style hardcore that I have heard since the Funeral Shock LP came out several years back. This record is excellent and I am looking forward to hearing a full length from Flip Shit. –frame (Reel Time)


FITT, THE:
When The Fitt Hit the Shan: LP
If i was strong enough to lift a phone book made entirely of lead, and said phone book was covered with some type of rubberized coating that gave it at least modest boingy-ness, then i’d imagine that beating myself repeatedly over the head with that item would spiritually approximate listening to this record. Heavy as shit, but still concise ((case in point: This eleven-song records spins at 45 rpm)). Slightly reminiscent of Japan’s occasionally excellent Mad Capsule Markets, but from more of a homemade American rust belt no hope loser type of angle. I don’t usually go in for “heavy,” but i’ll freely admit this is one leaden phonebook that’s not going to wind up in the recyclables. BEST SONG: “Fresh Meat.” BEST SONG TITLE: “When The Fitt Hit the Shan.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: The back cover reminds me of the back cover of the Lazy Cowgirls’ “Tapping the Source” album. The front cover is just a bunch of naked ladies. –norb (Deadfinger)


FITT, THE:
Is Dead: LP
I must say that while it is a little embarrassing to admit that I once tried to like bands like Poison and Firehouse simply because I assumed that’s what I was supposed to like being a “metal-head” at the tender age of eleven, I am not ashamed to admit that grunge (however gimmicky and played out it soon became) saved me from continuing to throw my money away on bands who are all probably now working at Jiffy Lube and staring at their old album covers wondering what went wrong. Rightfully due lambasting aside, The Fitt remind me of some of those long forgotten and less appreciated grunge bands from yesteryear who also qualified as hard rock and, in some instances, even metal. I can think of two bands The Fitt are probably fans of. One of them is pretty obvious to me. Helmet. But does anyone else remember Stompbox? No? Take my word for it, they weren’t all that bad and I’m hearing some shades of them in The Fitt. No actual “singing,” no guitar solos, not trying to reinvent anything nor any unrealistic aspirations for becoming a renaissance band of any sort. Just well written and arranged songs culminating with the final track “Helpless,” which is causing me to reevaluate the significance and influence of Black Flag’s My War just as much as Neil Young (whose cover this is of) in classic and modern grunge. By the way, I did mean Firehouse and not Firehose. Mike Watt wouldn’t be caught dead within a foot of some shitty hair metal band’s hairspray cloud. This record is The Fitt’s swan song to the world: sad but fitting. –Juan Espinosa (Deadfinger, patbn049@gmail.com)


FAT STUPIDS:
Self-titled: 7”
Hear me out, okay? It snows in Canada. A lot, to my current understanding. I assumed, instead of spending time outside, like the rest of the world likes to do, Canadians stay inside and write songs all day. Bands get formed that wouldn’t form in the United States because of all the snow. How close am I? Fat Stupids are from Halifax. Their record was mixed and mastered by members of the Crusades and The Creeps. The record sounds like the midway point between the Creeps and the Copyrights. The vocals come from two singers, both using a melodious, but forceful shout in their songs. The songwriting itself is a fine example of modern pop punk. This wins the “best music I got to review” award for this month. –Bryan Static (Rad Girlfriend / No Breaks, nobreaksrecords.com)


FAT PREZIDENT:
Bruto Slavo/VBK: CD
Bruto Slavo/VBK harkens back to the 1990s when the Epifat monster ruled the earth, with Fat Prezident sounding a lot like some oddly successful Strung Out/Pulley/Ten Foot Pole combination. It’s such a played-out genre but these guys are good at it, and it turns out that they’ve actually been a band since 1994. Croatian punks that insert some actual fury into the mix here. It’s convincing and well executed. Interesting also for the fact that they split their songs up, with the ones sung in Croatian closing things out. Surprisingly potent stuff. This will get some listens. –keith ()


FADEAWAYS:
Young, Wild & Wretched: LP
The band bio namechecks Teengenerate, the Rip Offs, the Mummies, Supercharger, and the Spaceshits, but this proved to be largely wishful thinking on their part as the group sounds more like a Japanese version of the Makers than any of the aforementioned ‘90s garage icons, although i suppose a case could be made that they do sound a bit tonally similar to that Teengenerate EP recorded at Kearny Barton’s place. Not a bad record on its own merits, but if you’re imagining that dropping the needle on this one is gonna magically transport you back to the mid-’90s and, oh wow, happy times are here again, think again, sucka. BEST SONG: “Won’t Come Back.” BEST SONG TITLE: “Stupid Girl (Has Pretty Face).” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: All three members are depicted wearing matching red and white horizontally striped shirts on the cover. I guess that was their way of currying favor with Horizontal Action. –norb (Dead Beat, dead-beat-records.com)


FACIALS:
Self-titled: LP
It’s a tough gig to bring the message and the party at the same time, but Facials does it with fuckin’ style! One part righteous lady/queer punk like something Rumbletowne would release, one part Chicago garage rock with keys like something Shit Sandwich would release, all with an early SF proto-punk element. Eleven tracks that get down into the nitty gritty of urban, counter-culture life, but unafraid to throw a little humor into the mix. Wrap it all up with a four-and-a-half minute-long ballad about Patty Hearst, and you have one killer record. Definitely track this one down. –Daryl Gussin (Chaos Rurale, chaosrurale.com)


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