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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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TEENAGE GLUESNIFFERS:
Chinese Demography: Cassette
I’ve given up attempting to shame the youth into abandoning their romantic fixation with the cassette format. I mean, if i can’t talk them out of peeling the sizing stickers off the brims of their baseball hats, i surely can have no legitimate impact in shaping their view of magnetic tape. Despite their being both Italian and pop punk—a combination fairly notorious for producing senselessly imitative results—the Teenage G’s are actually fairly cool. Instead of providing another unrequested dose of Queers/Weasel/Riverdales clonage, they’re actually more reminiscent of a few German bands: The slightly-higher-pitched-than-usual vocals and layered guitars evoke sensuous whiffs of Gigantor, whilst the rhythm section is more evocative of the Richies ((who sounded just like Animal Boy era Ramones anyway)). I can say with some assurance that this is the cassette of the year thus far! BEST SONG: “Sick of You.” BEST SONG TITLE: “Back from Pasalacqua.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Recorded in Milan; mixed in Denver. A meatball with a nosebleed! –norb (Teenage Gluesniffers, teenagegluesniffers.bandcamp.com)


SYMBOL SIX:
Self-titled: LP
I can easily prattle on about the extras that have been included with the reissue of this seminal L.A. hardcore band’s criminally overlooked and ultra-rare initial 1982 salvo, and yes, the inclusion of rehearsal recordings, live tracks, and a new tune or two is definitely ice cream on some o’ the best pie you’re ever gonna eat. Let’s be real here, though. The fine doctor could’ve released only the original Posh Boy EP’s four tracks (plus “Box of Bones,” which was on one of that label’s later compilations) here and this would still be one of the best purchases one could wish for. Everything that made early Southern California hardcore so goddamned influential is etched into every single groove that make up the opening five tunes here—melody, aggression, and attitude melded into a perfect blend of beach-tinged thug pop that made bands like the Adolescents and others household names. Fuggin’ stoked as hell to see this available again, and I highly recommend you pick up a copy before you’re again paying outrageous sums for a copy of your very own. –jimmy (Dr. Strange)


SWINGIN’ UTTERS:
Poorly Formed: CD
Ah, the old trusty Swingin’ Utters back in the game with what I believe is their seventh studio album and their second in two years after an eight-year absence of new material. Just like with every album that succeeded their monumental first and second (The Streets of San Francisco and A Juvenile Product of the Working Class) the Utters are using progression to their advantage by giving two shits to the wind as to what is “popular” or “sells.” The country and Pogues influences are still very much intact, though this time we’re also treated to something I myself had yet to hear in previous recordings by way of the clean toned guitars. Fuck me if this doesn’t work perfectly for a band whose track record consisted of a strict diet of feedback and crunch with the obvious exception of those songs where the amps were intentionally turned off in favor of some steel guitars and mandolins (which are also present on some of the tracks here). This album is sure to please even the most die-hard Utters fan with plenty of fist pumpers (“The Librarians are Hiding Something,” “Pour Beans,” “Dreadlock Dread Reggae”) and whiskey glass relaxers alike (“I’m a Little Bit Country,” “Sevita Sing”). A second full spin of the album is not recommended, it’s mandatory. The day the Swingin’ Utters stop making good music is the day I pack up my bags and move to Zimbabwe. –Juan Espinosa (Fat, fatwreck.com)


STRIFE:
Witness a Rebirth: CD
Rising from the ashes, legendary ‘90s hardcore band Strife has returned with their first album since 2001’s Angermeans. Strife was one of the flagship bands which built Victory Records as a label in the ‘90s, with two studio albums, a singles collection, and a split live release with fellow ‘90s hardcore titans Earth Crisis and Snapcase. With Witness a Rebirth, Strife finds a home on the excellent 6131 label, and embarks on a new era of their already storied career. The album, in many ways, is a literal rebirth for the band. Drummer Sidney Niesen is the only notable absence from the core lineup of the band, replaced by ex-Sepultura drummer Igor Cavalera. Musically, the band has returned to the root of their sound with technical and aggressive playing, calling to mind their first two studio albums: 1994s One Truth and 1997s In This Defiance. The tracks “Carry the Torch,” from whose lyrics comes the name of the album, “Show No Mercy,” and “The Distance” were my favorite tracks because they captured so well what I think of as the essence of Strife’s sound. A number of tracks feature guest performers, including Billy Graziadei on “Never Look Back,” Marc Rizzo on “In This Defiance,” and Terror’s Scott Vogel on “Look Away.” Of all the guest appearances, Marc Rizzio’s guitar solo towards the close of “Never Look Back” was my favorite. Longtime fans will be so taken by Strife’s return to form, they’ll be checking their beepers and iphones trying to figure out what decade this is. –Paul J. Comeau (6131, joey@6131records.com)


STORMSHADOW:
Set on Destroy: LP
Stormshadow were an early ‘00s New Brunswick three-piece and this is their long-delayed final LP. They wrote short, shambolic songs that changed moods and vocalists every few measures. You get a guy bellowing from inside a half-empty soda full of cigarette butts, a woman with a snotty voice, thrashin’ breaks, swampy distorted bass, single note stuff where the drums hit with the guitar pick… I’m thinking Minutemen, Hickey, a skipping Dillinger 4 record, and how much I want to go to one of their shows and spill beer on myself. –CT Terry (Don Giovanni)


STOPS, THE:
Self-titled: EP
Easily one of the best records I’ve heard in the past couple years. So damn good it’s unreal. It’s driving and tuneful punk rock from out of Portland with a lot of soul. From the beginning of “Wait for Today,” you hear Stefania’s voice you’re hooked. The music has a bit of a dark vibe, and is kind of moody, but not bogged down in the dreary or bleak. In fact, the songs on the second side are a bit more upbeat, especially on the aptly titled “Light Inside.” They sometimes repeat lines over and over, and with great effect, as it works its way into your mind, and you can hear the passion in the delivery as well. I like the guitar sound on here, with a slightly distorted and jangly syrupy thickness. This is one of these records where, when you listen to it, it’s a reminder that it’s a great time to be punk. I’m sitting here wondering what their live shows are like, and when the next record will be out... –Matt Average (Residue, residue-records.com)


STAT DAD:
Mominatrix: 7” EP
There are two great punk bands from Laramie, WY? Okay, they share the same bassist. But here Miguel Chen steps up to the mic and delivers. He seems upset. Two of the songs have “shit” in the title. But I’m here to tell him it’s okay. “You’re a Cop” and the title track really thrash with abandon. I’m not going to tell Miguel to give up his day job, but his moonlighting gig is pretty damn sweet too. –koepenick (Sexy Baby)


STAT DAD:
Mominatrix: 7” EP
Straight-ahead, punchy punk with an obnoxious lyrical bent. The outcomes are given that much more heft, courtesy of a Blasting Room mastering. –jimmy (Sexy Baby)


STACIAN:
Songs for Cadets: LP
This wasn’t what I was expecting from the heavy metal font. It’s a one-woman electro project. Cold, cold synth and drum machine with the occasional tweaked and subdued female vocal coming forth in the mix, echoed and chilling. Devoid of human emotion, it really comes off as eerie. It would work well as the soundtrack to an eighties b-movie, a horror film, or one of those sci-fi flicks with poorly-reproduced punks in them to symbolize a dystopian world of technology and squalor. And people being hunted by androids. Synth-pop this is not. It’s an alluring, yet uncomfortable, listen that I’m repeatedly drawn back to. –Craven (Moniker)


SPY DEVICE:
Miniaturized: LP
Middling garage punk with a flat singer. –jimmy (Minute Rock)


SPRAY PAINT:
Self-titled: CD
So I immediately decided that this band was awesome based on the title of the first track, “Canadian Trash.” I thought, “How sweet! A song about my people!” I figured I’d be doing some basic rocking out, but instead I found myself checking to make sure my windows were fully closed and my door was locked. Is there such a genre as creeper punk? Because I’m pretty sure this is it. This Spray Paint album is the Soundtrack to Stalking, the album you pop in when you ditch school early to follow the love of your life—who doesn’t even know you exist—back to his house so you know where to creep on him in the future. (Just me?) However, the genius of it is that it’s also the album you pop in when you’re running away from the crazed creeper who you didn’t know existed until now, as she follows you back home so she knows where to creep on you in the future. Spray Paint synchronizes the stalker and the stalkee—this is some multi-purpose shit right here. Although they sound as if they were Interpol coming down from a meth binge after joining the Illuminati, virtually every song is flawlessly produced and insanely appealing. Spray Paint is proper post-punk along the lines of the A-Frames and the Intelligence, with the attitude of the Hangmen and Night Beats thrown in for good measure. A hearty four restraining orders out of five! –Rishbha –Guest Contributor (S.S., s-srecords.com)


SPOKENEST:
We M●ve: 12”
At some point, you gotta take responsibility for yourself, your actions. That’s why, no matter how shitty someone is, punk cops and scene police will fight endless battles without a decisive victory. In a subworld that touts freewill, dickheadery and assholeishness are always on the table. There will always be racists, misogynists, and classists in punk. How to rise above? How to set a moral and musical compass? It’s fucking up to you. All of it. Who you align with. Who you celebrate with. Frontload that shit. Be your own ultimate boss. Those standing next to you are your friends. Those standing next to you for a long time are your extended family. There are righteous people out there making honest, great, unadulterated, authentic music. Flocks of ‘em. No, it’s not easy. Much of it is hidden, coded, protective. If it wasn’t, all of it would be broadcast and timeshared by both millionaires and “social entrepreneurs” alike. With Spokenest, I’m talking of people walking the walk over the broken neon dreams of weak-willed people with dollar signs wogga-wogga-wogga-ing in their eyes. If it doesn’t mean anything to you today, there’s the fucking door. We’ll celebrate without you. Spokenest is Daryl and Adrian of God Equals Genocide. They fit in that cosmology of dynamite male/female duos. Evens. Shellshag. Street Eaters. They’re as much birth-of-L.A.-punk—Dils, especially—as “fringe-wonderfully-becomes-center-in-twenty-years” punk of the Big Boys and Minutemen. This review has more words than this entire record, yet the record has volumes more to say. Recommended without reservation. –todd (Self-released)


SOMALI PIRATES:
Greatest Hits: 7” EP
Gruff, straightforward punk stuff about workin’, the Second Amendment and, well, Somali Pirates. Some of the lyrics’ll likely cause a bit o’ head scratchin’ in some circles, especially lines like, “Stay strapped/it’s a dangerous world/too many non-white boys/too many non-white girls,” in a song extolling the “patriotic” virtues of owning a gun and using it to ward off the threat of thieves, New World Order, and FEMA camps, but I’m guessin’ they’re makin’ a tongue-in-cheek point in the same way D.I. did with “Guns.” –jimmy (Camel Clutch, camelclutchrecords@hotmail.com)


SLIT PLASTERS, THE:
Chasing Jet Black Muffs: 10”
Vatican City’s most ardent boosters of the Pussycat font, it always seemed like the Slit Plasters’ packaging was always better than their actual music. Thus, it’s probably for the best that this record is less interesting-looking than its predecessors; the songs are generally better than what i remember on previous emissions ((possibly due to guest Farfisist King Automatic walking his murderous intentions over there)). Sometimes it sounds like some European King Tuff equivalent covered in some kind of weird salty Italian liquorice ((the kind that’s spelled weird like that and is fatal in large doses)), and other parts of it just sounds like those icky bands you’d sometimes wind up playing a bar show with, where the singer wore mirror shades and had some kind of ironic poofy hairdo and you couldn’t figure out what they sounded like, or what they were trying TO sound like, and, once in a while, it just rocks. Eh. I wish these guys nothing but the best in their quest for jet black muffs; much like the gays and marriage, you’re more than welcome to my share. BEST SONG: Either “The Thompsons” or “Fast Food LaneIs the Masterplan.” BEST SONG TITLE: Say what you will about “Street Fight Kaiser” or “I Can Squeeze My Own Juice,” it’s tough to beat “Oink Oink Oink Oink Oink.” FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Both sides of the label are printed with the number “66/46,” as if it were some important bit of technical information, upon the meaning of which i can only speculate. –norb (Chorizoloco)


SINKING SUNS:
Vicious World: 7”
This is the sort of music that plays in a bar that you have to get to by sneaking through an alley filled with bubbling barrels of toxic waste while mutant rats dive for your feet. When you finally get inside the bar, the bouncer punches you in the face just to give you a bloody nose so you fit in with all the other people jumping around to this cacophony with knives in their teeth and life’s failures left behind. –mp (facebook.com/SinkingSuns.rock)


SHIT STREET:
Self-titled: 7”
Shit Street may well be the punkest band in Helsinki, Finland. Well, to be honest I am pretty sure they are the only band I’ve ever heard from Helsinki, but they are pretty damn punk. The 7” features four mid-tempo pogo punk numbers that are really well played and have a great, raspy lead vocal. I can’t help but make the comparison to Canada’s hidden gem of punk rock, The Ripcordz. Great stuff! –ty (Älävittukitise! kakkakatu@gmail.com))


SHIRKS, THE:
Self-titled: 12”EP
Holy moly, this record flies by so quick I’m not sure if I can do it justice. I do know that there is an underlying “wolf” concept going on in between the grooves. And they have a song called “930 Dicks.” Not that I dislike the place, I just think it’s funny. If you like The Marked Men then you should be smart enough to welcome The Shirks into your home, too. Your ears will thank you. –koepenick (Grave Mistake)


SHAVED WOMEN:
Self-titled: 7”
Distorted vocals, lyrics firmly couched in self-loathing and confusion, and a passable nod to scuzzy ‘80s hardcore. For comparison’s sake, the band seems to be leaning most heavily towards Black Flag—there are a few Ginn-like guitar flashes on the A-side, and the flip, “Adulthood,” is a longer, droning affair, a template really laid out by Damaged. It’s all a bit lacking in jaw-dropping “Oh shit” moments, but convincing enough. –keith (Shaved Women)


SETIEMBREONCE / SIN ORDEN:
Split: 7” EP
Sin Orden: One of the sad realities of the whitewashed nature of punk’s history is that a band that’s had as profound an impact on the genre as Los Crudos has will likely never get a third of the recognition they deserve. Sure, there was never a shortage of bands singing in Spanish or becoming involved in community activism and politics, but so many bands across the nation, the continent, and the planet can trace their primary influence right to the feet of Martin and his cohorts. That influence drips off of Sin Orden’s three tracks here, from their approach, to their attack, to even the singer’s vocal tones. I say this not to take away anything from the band under discussion, because they more than handily put their own personal stamp on their music, but merely to note its presence in the hot-shit tunes they offer here. Setiembreonce: Starts off with a sliver of metal riffage, then lets fly with four short blasts of high-velocity thrash that keep the metal flaked in here and there and whiz by before you’ve had the chance to take it in. In all, good split here. –jimmy (Not Normal, notnormal.bigcartel.com)


SEE YOU IN HELL:
Jed: 12” EP
The hardcore gods have smiled down on us yet again and bestowed upon our unsuspecting asses a juggernaut of a record from the CzechRepublic’s own See You In Hell. No time is wasted here in establishing just which particular region these guys are faithfully paying homage to. You like Warhead? How about Gauze and Lip Cream? Now, combine those forces with the timeless d-beat onslaught of Mob 47 and you’ve got yourself quite the thrash brigade. You’d do well to step aside as these Czechs are charging full speed ahead and taking no prisoners with this eight-song assault. I hope these guys come through the West Coast sometime soon. If they do, just look for the idiot grinning from ear to ear in the front row. That’d be me. –Juan Espinosa (Insane Society, Voltage, insanesociety.net, voltage-shop.com)


SECTOR ZERO:
“Guitar Attack” b/w “Hiding in My Car”: 45
The a-side is a bombastic three-chord excoriation ((albeit not the three chords of which you’re initially thinking)) that lies somewhere on the pastrami-splattered pavement between the Urinals and the Mad. The b-side starts out as sort of a generic Goner blues-punky thing, but swiftly disengages the kill switch ((paradoxically, to kill better)) and lurches into a brain-sandingly furious chorus. I AM ROUSED FROM MY TORPOR, AND AM OFF TO KILL MY FAMILY. You could be too! BEST SONG: “Hiding in My Car.” BEST SONG TITLE: “Guitar Attack.” I admit i might have this backwards. FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Drums by Jay Reatard! Buy with confidence! –norb (Goner)


SCIENCE POLICE:
You’re under Arrest in the Future: 7”EP
I don’t blame Science Police. In the buffet of life, I’m just really, really full of light, wafer-thin pop punk. It’s not their fault. Their songs are pretty much flawless: tight harmonies, equal bites of the pink frosted donut of the Parasites, Connie Dungs, Unlovables, all sprinkled with the bright colors of Dirt Bike Annie. There’s even a nice, kelpy little weave of organ coming in and out. They aimed at the target, made the band they wanted to make, and hit the bull’s eye with a professional calm and efficiency. I’m just not that interested. All the eighteen years of reviewing records that I’m so-so on has just backed up on me. Sorry. –todd (Bloated Cat, bloatedkat.storenvy.com)


SCENICS, THE:
Dead Man Walks Down Bayview: CD
An old Canadian punk band gets back together and releases a follow-up to their debut album, thirty-three years later, and fills it with laid-back rock tinged with rockabilly and country. Snooze. –jimmy (Dreamtower, dreamtowerrecords.com)


SABERTOOTH:
Morning Breath: 7” EP
Poppy punk of a similar strain as bands like Tiltwheel and such. The songs are nice ‘n’ noodly in structure with the requisite gravelly vocals that seem to be all the rage these days. –jimmy (Debt Offensive, debtoffensiverecs.bigcartel.com)


RUN FOREVER:
Settling: LP
Let me preface this by saying I really, really liked their previous album, The Devil, and Death, and Me. It was an album dense with a feeling of loss and yearning, but that same sense of loss proved jubilant with repeated listens. It’s an album firmly floored in the idea of being down but resolutely not out, culling what was salvageable from tragedy. Of trying desperately to move on. (Hell, that’s what I got out of it anyway.) It’s a great punk album couched in solemnity and earnestness, and I knew it was going to be a tough record to surpass. And unfortunately, I don’t quite think Settling does. It’s a strong record, but it just doesn’t have the same searing, knuckles-to-the-heart quality. I’m hoping it’ll continue to grow on me, but that quality of jubilation, of muscling through the darkness, just isn’t there this time around. It feels, to me, like it’s simply a dark, dark record. Like it’s been aptly titled. Which is fine, clearly. But I personally miss that duality, you know? Still, I’m a sucker for Anthony Huebel’s voice, and the production here is solid, the songs are succinct (something The Devil… had a bit of a problem with) and Settling remains an undoubtedly solid album. I just hope it grows on me. –keith (Tiny Engines)


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