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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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VIOLENT ARREST / ENDLESS GRINNING SKULLS:
Split: 7”

When I was fifteen some twenty-five years ago, I discovered hardcore around the Britcore era of ‘87/’88. I lived in the middle of nowhere and my only exposure to new music was through tape trading and writing to bands. One person I wrote to was Baz of Ripcord and Heresy (to this day two of my favorite bands). He turned me on to bands like SS Decontrol, Siege, and Mob 47 as well as sending me all his band’s records. That part of my life was an education and I wouldn’t trade it for a thing. Twenty-five years on, ¾ of Ripcord play in Violent Arrest, one of the best U.K. hardcore bands (and dare I say best anywhere?). Nothing wasted, short sharp jabs to the face and neck. SS Decontrol and Siege filtered through Bristol old timers. This shit is as good as it gets. EGS have a tough task but stand up well with their brutal d-beat banger. Discharge meets Doom with some Flat Earth early U.K. core styling. This shit is fresh as fuck. Comes with the new issue of Artcore, which is a banger too. Highly recommended. Year end top 10 business.

–Tim Brooks (Artcore, artcorefanzine.co.uk)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Steelcap Love Affair: CD

A label sampler featuring twenty-one tracks of sub-Subs street punk, bad metal, shouts of “skinhead!”, and enough macho-hoarse vocals to make a throat lozenge executive drool. Of particular note was the band The Clichés, who turn in a ditty called “Skinhead” with no apparent realization just how fitting their band name is.

–jimmy (Spirit Of The Streets, spiritofthestreets.de)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Punk in the Trunk Bootlegs Vol. 1 – Live at Burger Records 7/19: CD

Heller Keller play rapid, female-fronted punk and sing songs about cereal and air conditioning. Traps PS sound kinda like the A-Frames and sing songs about really deep shit I can hardly understand. Great Ghosts sound like Half Japanese trying to play the Peanuts theme backwards, and their song topics are not for mortal man to comprehend. Graphic Garrett tells jokes about drinking and manatees, and Suzy’s Dead sound like a Californian version of Patrik Fitzgerald. I would say that this show probably beats whatever I was doing on July 19, but I looked back at my calendar and that was the day I sang “He’s a Whore” with Die Kreuzen so I think we’re going to call it a tie. BEST SONG: Heller Keller, “Cereal Killer” BEST SONG TITLE: Suzy’s Dead, “Fuck July,” though I do not agree with this statement. FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: Nonstandard slimline DVD case packaging ensures this CD will either be kept in a place of great prominence or else simply discarded! Go big or go home!

–norb (Punk In The Trunk, soundcloud.com/punk-in-the-trunk)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Big Neck Record Store Day: 7” EP

As the titled suggests, this is Big Neck’s compilation contribution to this year’s Record Store Day celebration. Populating the disc are one track each by the Livids, XRays, Cheap Freaks, and Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb. All are fine bits of high-octane garage-influenced punk and I’ll go out on a limb and guess the tracks are exclusive to this release—if not, what would be the point, right? If you dig any of the bands, or just like yer swaggering caboose handed to you by bands meting out raucous rock’n’roll, this is definitely worth the green and the scramble.

–jimmy (Big Neck)


VACATION CLUB:
“Daydream” b/w “Forest Babe”: 7”

Although one supposes that comparison to quirky fellow Hoosier Staters like First Base and Charlie And The Skunks is inevitable ((or, perhaps, merely evitable)), what I think this record really sounds like is what Beg, Borrow & Steal-era Ohio Express would have sounded like if Lou Reed quit his job writing twerpy pop hits for Pickwick Records not to run off and shoot Drano® with Andy Warhol, but to write twerpy pop hits for Cameo-Parkway instead. IN OTHER WORDS, IT SOUNDS LIKE BOTH THE BANDS WHO DIDN’T SUCK IN 1968! Watchyour ass Bobby Kennedy! BEST SONG: “Forest Babe” BEST SONG TITLE: I’ll take either “The Black Angel’s Death Song” or “It’s Too Groovy,” depending on which band that isn’t Vacation Club we’re talking about. FANTASTIC AMAZING TRIVIA FACT: There sure the hell are a lot of boobs on the covers of the records I’ve been assigned to review this month.

–norb (Randy!, randyrecords.blogspot.com)


URNS, THE:
Deep Web: LP

The Weezer comparison is inevitable. But you loved Weezer, remember? Take away the ironic college geek chic and replace with actual disaffected youth and you’ve got a bangin’ LP that drags the early ‘90s indie rock into the 2000-teens. The Urns bring slack rock back to the kids, sloppily careening close to falling apart before regaining control with a Superchunk lead, an ambient keyboard swirl, or a dissonant third guitar and topped with a swelling sing-along chorus. The LP showcases all these strengths, arguing that The Urns are a great band for either a sweaty basement or a nice venue with a bumpin’ sound system. Check it.

–Matt Seward (Fat Sandwich, fatsandwichrecords.com)


URINALS, THE:
Negative Capability: 2 x LP

The definitive collection of The Urinals finally available on vinyl. The Urinals were a seminal L.A. punk band, comprised of UCLA students too smart to learn their instruments. No band sounded like The Urinals and Los Angeles was lucky to have ‘em—they certainly brought a different element to the scene and remain underappreciated. Negative Capability contains all of the known Urinals material in existence, including live shows (fidelity is surprisingly good) at venues like the Hong Kong Cafe (recorded by Paul Cutler no less). Negative Capability is an important record no fan of L.A. punk rock should be without. Be sure to pick up the recently released 100 Flowers LP on Superior Viaduct as well.

–ryan (In The Red)


TWITCHING TONGUES:
In Love There Is No Law: LP

Here I sit, thirty-two years young, and finally, a band has gone and done it. Los Angeles’s Twitching Tongues has boiled down seemingly every brilliant, heavy influence from my youth—Type O Negative, Pantera/Down, Only Living Witness, Crowbar, Life Of Agony, Cro-Mags, Machine Head, Sheer Terror—into one incredibly sincere, pained, and immeasurably weighty full-length record. Understandably, Twitching Tongues is positioned within the current hardcore crop—members claim(ed) spots in Nails, Disgrace, Creatures, Ruckus, and other notables—but the depth of this band goes well beyond the hardcore formula. Musically, there’s a maturity here rarely seen in hardcore circles. The consistent, seamless shifts in tempo and dynamics are masterful (conjuring River Runs Red or Bloody Kisses) and the playing itself is dead-on. That said, the highlight here is vocalist Colin Young. Young’s softer sections offer a genuine sadness similar to Mina (née Keith) Caputo or “Hollow”-style Philip Anselmo, while his roars (often still melodic) hearken back to a young Robb Flynn or Kirk Windstein. Needless to say, these are some legendary shoes to fill; yet Young seems to wear them quite comfortably. I’m not going to attempt to make any deep lyrical analysis here, but know that this is a soul-bearing record that speaks candidly of Young’s darkest memories, often with dark, religious overtones (which I was predictably drawn to). It’s venomous, painful, and often chilling in its intimacy. Twitching Tongues’ first LP, Sleep Therapy, was great, excellent even, but I use no hyperbole when I say that In Love There Is No Law is a high point of the hardcore scene (perhaps matched only by releases from Starkweather, Between Earth & Sky, and Ringworm) in the past decade. Absolutely incredible.

–Dave Williams (Closed Casket Activities)


TRASHMONSTERS:
There’s a Rat in the Tunnel of Love: CD

Cali-style melodic punk with a natural touch of rock’n’roll and some welcome humor in the lyrics (“I Was a Teenage Pessimist”). If I had this in high school, it would have been in the car stereo post-getting dumped, on the way to a diner with my buddies to make inside jokes until the waitress stopped refilling our coffees.

–Chris Terry (Heap O’ Trouble)


NO TONGUE :
Body + Mind: 7”

Visceral and atonal without any pretentiousness, Oakland’s TONGUE (pronounced No Tongue) play evolved screamo without warranting any guffaw. Like Fugazi or A Day In Black And White, the hits are hard and frantic yet remain harnessed. This isn’t sloppiness in the guise of competence, but, instead, proficiency that ranges from brooding duress to dreamy, nearly pop-like melodies. The songs never become awash or redundant; they are concise and memorable with vocals that feature gentle falsettos and guttural strains. (There are even some languid “oooh”s snuck in there.) There’s a lot of variety on this four song 7”. Also includes a zine with a wax poetic manifesto entitled “Destroy Hardcore”—I couldn’t agree more.

–Sean Arenas (Kyeo Speaks, kyeospeaks@gmail.com, kyeospeaks.com)


THIRTY SIX STRATEGIES:
Strategy One: CD

The Thirty Six Strategies (or “stratagems,” depending on the source you’re looking at) is a collection of Chinese sayings akin to Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, in that it offers effective tactics in matters of war, politics, diplomacy, and so on. Strategy One, according to translator Stefan H. Verstappen, translates as “Fool the Emperor to Cross the Sea” in his book, The Thirty Six Strategies of Ancient China. The idea behind this strategy, he explains, is that in order “to lower an enemy’s guard you must act in the open hiding your true intentions under the guise of common every day activities.” With that in mind, Thirty Six Strategies—the band—play impressive poppy punk with ringing Hüskers-via-Leatherface guitars and flat-but-fitting vocals belting out lyrics addressing mostly personal issues with a vagueness that’ll surely help to avoid any potential controversies. Whether or not they’re adhering to the precepts of the aforementioned Strategy One is dependent on their ultimate, if any, ulterior motives—are they looking to capitalize on any subsequent popularity they garner within the punk scene to vault them into mainstream success? Is their end-game to subvert and bring down the whole of punkdom via ambiguous lyrics and catchy hooks? Are they just another band who picked a random name they thought clever, only to have some asshole reviewer pick it apart and find nefariousness in efforts wholly innocuous?—and only the band knows the truth at this point. I for one intend to remain ever-vigilant.

–jimmy (Boss Tuneage)


TEN VOLT SHOCK:
78 Hours: CD

(This was released in 2010, and there’s no sign of it being a reissue on my copy here, so I’m not sure why I got it with my review package—especially since they recently released a new record—but whatev). Ten Volt Shock are a relatively long-running German band who clearly are no strangers to the “angular,” noisy sounds of Shotmaker, Big Black, Hoover, and Hot Snakes. This kinda thing is certainly having something of a resurgence right now (ahem… METZ) and Ten Volt Shock does it as well as anyone else. I’ve personally always felt that this sub-subgenre was right in that awkward place on the spectrum between heavy enough and hooky enough (and therefore sorta lacking in both respects) but people sure seem to go wild for it.

–Dave Williams (Bakery Outlet, bakeryoutletrecords.com / Salon Alter Hammer / Screaming Mimi / X-Mist)


TECHNICOLOR TEETH:
Sage: 7” EP

Woozy, dreamy pop stuff with lots of reverb and such. They dirty up the sound plenty, but counterbalance it with tasty hooks and engaging arrangements. I’m diggin’ it more with each listen.

–jimmy (Cowabunga)


DEATH ON THE RADIO:
Death Rock: 7"
“Life on the Line” is the “rock” of the title—a movin’ little ditty with a dark undertow buried under the guitars not unlike 45 Grave. The flip, “Pleasure and Pain,” provides the “death,” with slower tempos and a bit more overall brooding. Can’t say it fully worked for me, but it wasn’t bad by any stretch and I do hear potential for greater things if/when they slough off a bit more of their influences and start honing a much more original sound. –jimmy (Scare America, myspace.com/scareamericarecords)


TANGLED LINES, THE:
Stacy: 12” LP

Not at all what I expected. The cover art totally threw me off. It’s a shattered image of a Barbie-faced mutant, glossy and pink with stars and sparkly font. I am not fluent in Polish (Tangled Lines is from Poland), but there apparently is a story behind this mutant Barbie named Stacy and her escapades through consumerist hell; song titles include “Botox Smile” and “Reinvention.” What I do know is that this LP at times totally rages with hardcore/thrash female-fronted vocals (reminiscent to Foreign Objects), as well as erodes and digresses into a strange swamp of rock breakdowns that go nowhere for no good reason. Overall, though, it’s pretty good. Apparently, Tangled Lines is no longer. They broke up in 2012, and this is their final album.

–Camylle Reynolds (Refuse, refuserecords.prv.pl)


CRIATURAS:
Espiritu de Libertad: 12” EP
Great Scandinavian/Japanese-inspired hardcore punk from Austin, TX which comes storming out of the gates at full speed without a single dull moment to be heard on this slab of wax. Fierce female vocals are front and center with fully enraged screams that also show range with a little melody and grace eerily similar in style to those of Chitose from the Comes. Actually, the more I listen to this, the more it sounds like the Comes if they hailed from Sweden and not Japan. I’ve been seeing Criaturas’ records here and there for a while now and never bothered to pick one up, but that’s about to change because this album left me wanting to hear more. I highly recommend this one, friends! –Juan Espinosa (Residue, no address listed)


CRASHDOLLZ:
Self-titled: CD-R
Self indulgent, mind blowing-ly boring “punk-metal” on this CD-R which should more appropriately be used as a beer coaster. There’s so many fucking contacts listed all over this disc, not to mention a business card. Crashdollz, you obviously don’t read this fanzine so let me clue you in: we’re not an agency here so do us both a favor and stick with the one, sole, best way to get in touch with your band should anyone feel the need to. Me, I’m not going to hold my breath for that miracle. –Juan Espinosa (Self-released, crashdollz.com)


TANGLED LINES, THE:
Discography: Cassette

It was a major disappointment when I heard Tangled Lines had called it quits. This cassette preserves every blazing riff—their full length, 7”s, including the Wash the Shit Off 7”, which was my favorite of their releases, their split with 4Sivits, plus demos, live tracks, and more. I saw the Tangled Lines when they toured the U.S., and was immediately hooked on their thunderous sound and their positive message. Vocalist Luise had one of the most distinct voices in hardcore, a combination of bubblegum cuteness and banshee howl screams, which, when coupled with shredding riffs, gave Tangled Lines a raw power to which few other bands could compare. Every ounce of intensity packed into this cassettemakes it a must listen.

–Paul J. Comeau (Spastic Fantastic, spasticfantastic.de)


SURPRISE VACATION:
Self-titled: 7”

The cover for this record is a total throwback to day-glow side of the eighties. Which could be part of why I’m reminded of bands like the Simpletones and the Crowd when I listen to this record. Edward Colver took the photos for this release, which makes sense. Surprise Vacation has a poppy beach punk sound. Song titles like “Drive” and Head Over Heels” let you know that these boys are in it for fun. This is a feel good, summer, punk rock single, complete with handclaps and “whoa’s.”

–Ryan Nichols (Bad Touch)


COME TO GET HER:
Another Way to Go: CD
­Reviews are made a lot easier when bands sound just like another band. There’s always the possibility you can write a simple review: “I liked this band a lot better when they were called ____.” Or you can go on and on about the similarities between the band and the other band they sound like (but how they’re obviously not as good). Another option is to write, “____ called—they want their sound back.” In the case of Come To Get Her, they are trying hard to emulate Rise Against, circa 2001. I suppose if I received this a dozen years ago I probably would’ve liked it, but perhaps even then I would’ve noticed how derivative it was of the Chicago foursome. At least Come To Get Her includes a Dag Nasty cover (“Circles”), but even then, the vocals aren’t pulled off very well. And like a number of punk albums, it includes the obligatory acoustic tune. Another Way to Go is good, stylistically, but the thirteen songs in thirty-eight minutes just don’t seem original in much of any way. –kurt (cometogether.bandcamp.com)


SUNDOWNER:
Neon Fiction: CD

Sundowner is a project of Chris McCaughan of The Lawrence Arms. It’s an acoustic-based singer/songwriter project that he started working on in early 2006. This is his third album. He is joined on this album by Neil Hennessy on bass guitar and drums. Together they have managed to make an acoustic album that will appeal to people not looking for a Springsteen clone, but for a band that gives the listener something substantial to listen to—no slogans, just pure musical enjoyment. These ten songs are a nice mixture of faster songs—”Cemetery West,” “We Drift Eternal”—and slower, more melancholic songs, like “My Beautiful Ruins” and “Grey on Grey.” The mix of the songs works really well to keep a flow going. It never drags or gets too maudlin.

–Rick Ecker (Fat Wreck Chords, fatwreck.com)


SUNDIALS:
Always Whatever: LP

Subtitled, “A Collection of Songs from 2009-2012,” this record traces Sundials’ evolution from scrappy punk band with a taste for Archers Of Loaf to Weezer-y emo for people who never felt guilty for liking Alkaline Trio (the cover even references Alkaline Trio’s self-titled singles collection). Sundials are a damn good band, and I’m pleased to have this to fill in the gaps in my collection.

–Chris Terry (Asian Man)


CLOSET BURNER:
Self-titled: LP
Hyper-speed grindcore stuff. Their lyrical stance on gay issues and challenging homophobia are commendable, but musically this just wasn’t my personal flask o’ poison. –jimmy (Reality Is A Cult)


STABLER:
Squadroom: Cassette

Stabler’s ten-track Squadroom is an eight minute, ten second pal. To me, Stabler’s Squadroom recalls Black Flag’s loose rush of power, akin to Damaged, minus Greg Ginn’s jazzpunk solos but very much with the rush and crash of a band that only pauses for the bass to dig out a jagged groove or to allow silence until the next track. To compare with something more recent? Maybe Chicago’s Weekend Nachos. Stabler songs like “Torture” and “Self-Disgust” offer uplifting lyrics, encouraging the listener to challenge mediocre shit—to be humbled, to be aware, and to take responsibility for life choices. So the content is there for lyric lovers like me. Sonically, the rapid swipe and chug of these tracks is ideal for smashing chairs to, or for powering through rough spots that Minor Threat tracks like “Seeing Red” and “Filler” just can’t clean. You can grab Squadroom off of Stabler’s Bandcamp (check out the vaguely titled “…preview…” song there, too) or procure a cassette from their label, Reality Is A Cult.

–Jim Joyce (Reality Is A Cult, realityisacult.blogspot.com / stabler.bandcamp.com)


SONNY VINCENT:
Totally Fucked: 7”

Smokin’ slab of rock efficiency. In two terrifically thick, big-hole sides, Sonny Vincent crams in three energetic garage gems. By “garage,” in this instance, I’m talking about a bunch of dudes bashing out hooky, fast songs with rudiments and an absence of bells and whistles, and none of the willfully lo-fi recording that follows the genre around—everything is audible and well-recorded in the mix. “Robot Radio” cribs hardcore’s oompa urgency, and “Come for You” is the most melodic of the batch by dint of soaring choral vocals. Wouldn’t be out of place on a Humpers/Stooges bill.

 

 

–Michael T. Fournier (Oops Baby, oopsbabyrecords.com)


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