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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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SUPPRESSION / NO COMPLY:
Split: 10” EP
The ever long-running Suppression continues to mutate and warp music with every new record. This one is less grindy than you might remember them being, and more bent math rock weirdness. Something like Fat Day crossed with what Mike Watt is doing these days. No Comply, who are back from the dead (did they ever really go away?), will sonically place you back in 1997, the peak and decline of powerviolence. They are noisier than I remember, but still raw and to the point. Spazz is a definite influence in the lyrics and sound, mixed with some noise excursions here and there. I prefer these guys over the cutesy “powerviolence” bands that sell pencils and gloss.  –Matt Average (To Live A Lie)


STRANGE MATTER:
Ennui Activation Dissolver: 7”
This record is weird. It is Midwestern-sounding noisy hardcore one minute, then it suddenly takes a turn towards the ‘80s with a thrash-influenced, riffy song. It continues to straddle this line throughout the seven songs on this record. It’s one of those records that is hard to talk about because while it may remind you of a bunch of different bands, the record doesn’t necessarily sound like any of those bands. Whatever this is, it’s cool.  –Mark Twistworthy (Dirty Hippy Barn)


STEVE ADAMYK BAND:
High Above: 7”
I will be the first to admit that I spend a lot of time pontificating about the music of Canada, my homeland. While many of my friends south of the border will often yuk it up about Bieber, Nickelback, or Celine Dion, I will often retort with a laundry list of killer Canuck outfits that continually blow my mind. Last year I added Steve Adamyk Band to that list. Seriously catchy, well written tunes seem to be the hallmark of SAB, and this three song slab goes a long way to perpetuate the legend. Added bonus: A cover of my favorite Canadian pop punk band of all time (Bum’s “A Promise Is a Problem”). You need this record. Trust me, I’m Canadian.  –ty (La Ti Da)


STATE OF FRANKLIN:
Optimistic Despite the Evidence: CD
Not to be confused with another band called Lost State Of Franklin, this duo specialize in low-fi chunky pop punk that reminds me of Dinosaur Jr. in some regards. Songs such as “Ringo’s Eyebrow” and “Neil Young’s Camaro” display a keen sense of humor which I fully welcome. I don’t really know why, but for me this CD evokes feelings of the East Coast in the winter—bare trees, grey skies, stocking caps, and seeing your breath. Good stuff. Bonus points for the Ben Snakepit band portraits.  –Garrett Barnwell (Girth)


SPERM:
Nightmare Life: Cassette
This really cool, really bizarre, really short six-song hardcore demo from Buffalo is full of intentional idiosyncrasies. With stylistic influences ranging from Antischism to Minutemen, there is a lot of diversity packed in. Apparently, they already have a second tape available as well. A nifty cassette shell with no labeling other than images of spermatozoa tops off this worthy release. Balls have sperm and Sperm has balls.  –Art Ettinger (Self-released, spermbuffalo.bandcamp.com)


SONIC ABUSE:
Still Pissed: 7” EP
Off the top of my head, I can only think of two references to Munich, Germany. There is the Steven Spielberg-directed film, called Munich, where Eric Bana goes around blowing the shit out of terrorists. And then there is Sonic Abuse, the punk band from Munich, Germany whose debut EP I have the pleasure of listening to right now. The only scene I remember from the movie is when an antagonist lays down on his hotel bed, not knowing the mattress springs are rigged to an explosive. Seconds later, his torso—sans limbs—is hanging from the ceiling fan, slowly spinning, dripping blood. Sonic Abuse is kind of like that, only the fan is spinning much faster than any domestic ceiling fan ought to, causing the blood to fly and creating a circle of carnage on the cream-colored hotel walls. This album is fast, unrelenting, raw power but the songwriting is not without a sense of humor. If you read the lyrics, for they are far too fast to understand and contemplate, you would hear nods to getting laid, hating jazz music, genocidal icemen from outer space, and Douglas Adams’sHitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.  –John Mule (Munich Punk Shop)


SNEEZZBIL, THE:
Self-titled: CD
When I was in high school, there was a point when all the band kids got into Primus. Bass strings started getting slapped every which way in the creation of quirk-filled songs fueled by awkward adolescent angst. One of those bands has apparently found a time machine and shipped itself straight to 2014, and of course the reliably what-the-fuck 1332 has put out a five-song EP featuring such brilliant tunes as “Shotgun,” in which the narrator is upset because he called shotgun and apparently didn’t get shotgun. Appropriately, it all ends in a rant about the TV show Who’s the Boss?  –mp (1332)


SMOOTH BRAIN:
One of Them: 7”
I’ve never visited Cleveland. Judging by this record, which features members of bands like 9 Shocks Terror and Pleasure Leftists, I have a feeling that they have a very specific method of partying. That method probably results in getting black and blue. Is happy-angry a thing? Because that’s how I’d describe this—emphasis on the angry. Sort of like, “Well, I don’t want to be at this party, but I’m here so I might as well kick holes in the walls because that would make me feel good.” Maybe happy isn’t the right word. It’s more like reveling in the anger, taking pleasure from it, thriving on it, and asking everyone else to do the same by singing along. Whether you do or you don’t, you’re probably not leaving without a bruise.  –mp (Dead Broke)


SLOW DEATH, THE / BROKEDOWNS, THE:
Split: 7”
Perfect. I’ve been waiting for this record since it was announced last year. It’s a match made in heaven. Take the lyrics of my favorite Brokedowns song, “Done with Funk,” where they sing, “Slow death! We’re all choking on the slow death!” In my humble opinion, the Brokedowns can do no wrong at this point. It’s been three years since their last LP, but they’ve tided us over with splits with a number of fantastic artists. The roster of bands that have done splits with the Brokedowns is better than most modern record labels. The Slow Death provide a nice counterpoint to the heavy hardcore-inspired punk that the Brokedowns lay down, but even The Slow Death seem pulled into the sonic vortex of The Brokedowns, offering three of their heaviest offerings I’ve heard from them. If you are a fan of modern punk and you haven’t checked out either of these bands, you are doing yourself a great disservice. Grade: A.  –Bryan Static (Red Scare)


SLACK BIRD:
Turvallisuuden Onnettomuus: 7”
As broad as my punk rock umbrella is, it’s not quite wide enough to cover this slosh of Finnish folk… but for the sake of not having the argument “what is punk?” it sounds like Tom Waits to a Finnish folk polka beat. Sounds cool? Then you get it, but I still don’t.  –Camylle Reynolds (Parta)


SLABS, THE:
Feed Our Dirty Dark Souls: Cassette
C’mon, gang. Look, I understand the urge, and I’m a cheerleader for it: everyone should be in a band, do what you can with what you have, blah blah blah, but shit or get off the pot. Seriously, for a band who obviously cares so much about what their listeners think about their image to put out such a clumsy, unlistenable mess in the name of “keeping it real” is a waste. There’s at least a little bit of money in the presentation, what with its lovingly wrought ‘60s psych-inspired graphic design and screen printed tapes. There are times, too, when if I squint my ears I can hear glimmers of trashy glam songwriting potential, unfortunately reduced to a dull thud by the horrific “recorded straight to a General Electric boombox” mix (their words, not mine) which sounds like wrapping a bunch of blown speakers in bubble wrap. But between the disparity of care in packaging and recording, I just don’t buy any of this. I can’t. It’s too contrived. The corny, canned between-song banter, which includes tuning and lame in-jokes before the music starts, makes it sound like these guys want to be playing a live show but can’t muster an audience, yet are so full of themselves that they assume listeners will sift through their proudly shitty, trying-too-hard “we don’t care” bullshit for a negligible mess of a yield. Nice cover, though.  –Michael T. Fournier (Shake!)


SIMPLE CIRCUIT:
Self-titled: CD
This band reminds me a lot of The Intelligence. In fact, the first song on this record sounds like it was lifted straight off the Males LP. Additionally taking cues from bands like The Fall—as well as other contemporary fuzzy-yet-pop-based garagey punk bands like Tyvek and Thee Oh Sees—results in a great debut full length from these guys and girl. There are thirteen songs total of angular post-punk goodness here, every single one a gem. This is absolutely, undoubtedly, recommended.  –Mark Twistworthy (Simple Circuit, simplecircuit.bandcamp.com)


SHRIEKS, THE:
Blood and Lunacy: CDEP
The Shrieks are a female horrorbilly (or psychobilly? I don’t know the correct “-billy” uses) from Helsinki, Finland. There has been an awful lot of this stuff coming out in the last few years, and it can get tiresome. Luckily, The Shrieks manage to get a step ahead of the majority with good songs and interesting-sounding vocals. If you are a fan of any type of “-billy,” I reckon you might like it.  –ty (The Shrieks, facebook.com/theshrieks)


SECRET SMOKER:
Terminal Architecture: LP
This three-piece from Baton Rouge play emotive hardcore in the vein of Chino Horde and Current. It’s a long-familiar and adept style of emo—not quite throwback, not quite a full evolution. The guitarist juggles clean, twinkly precision and distortion with unpredictable palm-muted chugs. Meanwhile, the fluid bass lines and dead-on drumming create a proper home for the intermittent jaw-clenched vocal delivery. The high-strung portions evoke The Nation Of Ulysses, but the restrained technical prowess overrides any fury. It’s all beautifully inventive and carefully orchestrated. “Bench Drop” is a highlight, as it showcases the most harnessed and unleashed facets of Secret Smoker’s sound. It would tickle my fancy to hear them hit harder the next time around, but, regardless, they’ve crafted an unmistakably defined identity in a recently reinvigorated genre. It’s exciting to hear a band that hasn’t so much reinvented the wheel, but instead installed some shiny spinners on a classic car. Got mine on a gorgeous clear vinyl. Recommended.  –Sean Arenas (Protagonist / Adagio830)


SATAN PANONKSI:
Hard Blood Shock: LP
Satan Panonski, a.k.a Ivica Čuljak, was quite a figure in Croatian and Yugoslavian punk in the eighties and nineties. Before he was turned on to punk, he was a delinquent kid sent off to a reform school in Germany. There he discovered punk and introduced it to his homeland in the crudest and most extreme of forms. He called his style of punk “Hard Blood Shock,” dressed in drag, and cut himself with razors on stage while singing songs with subject matter such as rough sex, violence, and incest. It gets more interesting from there. During a dispute, a mafia guy starting messing with his brother. Ivica stabbed the man and killed him. He was sentenced to twelve years hard time for murder, but due to his struggles with addiction and madness, he was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and transferred from prison to a mental institution. There he had access to musical instruments and recording equipment and could get day passes to play with his band. He was released early in 1989, only to have his country erupt into the Croatian War of Independence. He joined the Croatian army to protect his family, but became increasingly nationalist as the atrocities went on. He was mysteriously killed by a gunshot wound and it, according to the Croatian Army, was an accident, but some believe he was fragged. It’s a wild story, to say the least. Unfortunately, drama doesn’t always make for great music. In spite of its spirited attitude, its amateurish and uninteresting at best and intolerably annoying at worst. Not liking it upon first spin, I thought I might be getting soft. After all, it could just be a challenging record, like something The Germs or Rudimentary Peni would make. So I gave it a few more spins. On an agreeable night I could dig the first couple of songs, sort of, but from there it gets more experimental and it’s just ill-conceived. There’s a lot of a lot minimal guitar riffing with Panonski’s annoying caterwaul. If you could imagine the aural equivalent of Panonski’s lyrics about sucking off his dad, that’s what it sounds like.  –Craven Rock (S.S.)


RVIVR:
The Beauty Between: LP
RVIVR is one of the best things to come out of Olympia, WA. They are a gender-balanced four piece (two guys, two girls) who harmonize with each other and play to a tight, driving beat while belting out some very inspiring lyrics. I feel that if music could give you a hug and tell you not only that things will be okay, but things will awesome, RVIVR would be the arms that held you. Their songs focus on change for the better while not letting life’s daily bullshit get you down. There is a fine tuned dichotomy between Matt and Erica’s vocals; the male vocals are euphoric and heartfelt while the female vocals are coarse and raspy. Coupled by strong lead and rhythm guitar parts, they create a marriage of melody. Together, it sounds wonderful. “Spider Song” is far and away the most important track on this record for me. It deals with relationships that are not necessarily on the outs, but rather slowly loosing relevance for both parties. “You can love someone and just not stay friends,” is a centerpiece lyric from this song. It also focused on self-growth and being okay in your own skin. On the B-side there’s a trilogy of darker themes called “The Hunger Suite” which pulls empathy right out of you. This triplet of tracks (subtitled “Go Away,” “Bleed Out,” and “Hunger”) transport the listener through feelings of utter abandon, self-deprecation, and a satiable urge for recovery. The lyric “I get so low, solo” in “Go Away” gets challenged with “Magic’s not gone from the world, it’s just harder to find” in “Bleed Out,” ending with “We want to be well” in “Hunger.” Musically, even through lyrics of pain and loneliness, RVIVR stays bright and uplifting with pop punk sensibilities, inviting you to sing along every step of the way. They recognize the difficulty in balancing contentment and depression and manage to find the beauty between. –Kayla Greet (Rumbletowne)


RENO DIVORCE:
Lovers Leap: CD
It’s been awhile since we’ve last heard from Reno Divorce, the Colorado-based outfit led by Brent Loveday but here we are; a new CD thanks to the wonders of crowd-sourcing and Kickstarter. It looks like the band has an entirely new lineup since the last album, but maybe I am wrong. This stuff veers dangerously close to Social Distortion territory and Loveday himself sounds so similar to Mike Ness that it can be distracting. I cannot deny, though, that Loveday has really grown as a songwriter. I really think he could use someone to help him edit though, either a producer or another strong songwriter to help smooth out the rough spots, like some of the curious lyrical choices he makes.  –Garrett Barnwell (Rusty Knuckles)


REGIMEN:
Self-titled: LP
One of the pitfalls of reviewing gobs of releases over extended periods of time is that one can create mental snapshots of a particular scene/country’s music scene that might be a bit fallacious. Let’s take Sweden, for example. From Mob 47 to DS-13 to Regulations to AC4 to—well, you get the point—one inevitably forms a vision of an entire country packed with both snow and an entire population that is born and bred on a steady diet of Discharge and had embedded in its DNA the ability to effortlessly churn out some of the best punk/hardcore on the planet. I’m willing to bet large sums of money this isn’t true, and I have heard my share of less than stellar output from that region, but one making such a leap of logic wouldn’t exactly be out of the realm of possibility. Regimen does nothing to counter such a leap. With a bevy of (mostly) mid-tempo ragers that are inexplicably catchy amidst all the screaming and slamming, ye find yourself shaking an angry fist and shouting along with the Swedish gang-choruses that pop up like whack-a-mole heads, and at other times shimmy-slamming to many of the tunes’ odd surfy undertow. No, Sweden can’t be a punk paradise—c’mon, the law of averages dictates that there has to be at least one square block in that country that is infested with shitty bands—but this definitely makes it easier for some of us to dream such a thing is possible.  –jimmy (Gaphals)


RAYDIOS, THE:
No Expectation: 7”
I’ve always imagined Teengenerate and New Bomb Turks to be Japanese/American equivalents of each other. Both bands blasting out rip-roaring, fuzzed-out punk rock’n’roll heat that will make your hair stand on end and your ass shake. Later on in their career, the Turks began tackling some more mid-tempo, bluesy punk rock mixed in with their speed assault with fine results. That’s where The Raydios come in. Members of Teengenerate are doing something new, and as you would expect, rocking. Like I said above, the tunes here are more akin to the Stones-like swagger that the Turks were throwing down at the turn of the century and, also like the Turks, The Raydios pull it off with style. I want more than just three songs, and I’d love to see them tour over this way.  –ty (Secret Mission)


RATIONAL ANTHEM:
Whatevermind: LP
The “it” factor. Music folks have been looking for the formula for decades with limited results. The best bands (like The Brokedowns, Dan Padilla, Rumspringer) play styles that are all too familiar, but for some reason can push both hands into your chest and push your heart through your mouth. Add Rational Anthem to the list. Whatevermind takes the lyrical strength of Black Flag’s “Depression” and grinds it through haunting bubblegum punk tuneage so you’re drunk singing through the tears and smiling through today’s suck, ready for tomorrow because the Rational Anthem LP is still on the turntable. I’m late to the party, but oh well, never, whatevermind…  –Matt Seward (Rad Girlfriend, radgirlfriendrecords.com / John Wilkes Booth, johnwilkesboothrecords.com / Kiss Of Death, kissofdeathrecords.com / Bloated Kat, bloatedkat.storenvy.com)


RAKTA:
Self-titled: 12” EP
Tough one to describe here. Which is a good thing, really. I hear strong death rock elements in the percussion and bass, and occasionally in the guitar. Then there’s this really wide and blown-out post-punk, post-rock, post-whatever, sort of art-damaged, vibe that dominates the sound that keeps everything from getting too dark and too heavy. Things really get interesting around songs like “Life Comes from Death” with its creepy graveyard organ sound, and the lumbering “Secret” where the bass has a loose and dark edge that takes the sound into the depths. Then there are the vocals in that song that have this distant dream feel. So good... Unfortunately, the songs “Ganex; Black Mob” and “Caverna” run too long and bog things down, killing the mood established by the previous songs. “Caverna” has its moments, and is more focused than “Ganex,” but neither song fit well with the previous four. Maybe it’s a matter of having to spend more time with these songs. Whatever the case, the material on the first side is definitely worth your time.  –Matt Average (Nada Nada, nadanadadiscos.com)


RÄJÄYTTAJÄT:
Self-titled: LP
Good, trashy punk, like most any other artistic endeavor, first and foremost needs a heaping dose of conviction—you can pretty much sell any crap with just a smidge and you’re only ensuringa long, faceless stay in the dung heap of mediocrity without it. Like Teengenerate, the Reds, and others working that side of the road, these cats are well aware of this rule and go out of their way to make sure this disc is sweating barrels full of both conviction and chutzpah. Taking cues from early Stones (even going so far as to quote “The Last Time” at one point) and all the usual suspects, they intersperse heaps of audio samples more often heard on a Crass compilation between tracks and flail in wild abandon when the actual songs kick in, with live-wire energy levels and howling aplenty. Guaranteed to clear out yer next clambake of all but the most hearty and coolest of yer crew.  –jimmy (Deadbeat)


PYGMIES, THE:
Self-titled: LP
Alright! Second album time from this fantastic Calgary band, made up of ex-Neckers and Chixdiggit members. I could not be more pleased to report that although the band has been fleshed-out from two members to a full four-piece band, the results are absolutely stellar. This is—quite simply—top-shelf garage rock with power pop influences and phenomenal songwriting. The keyboards add to the sound, which is a rarity in my experience, and they are just perfect in the mix as well. Fans of bands like Muck And The Mires and Mondo Topless will find a whole lot to like with the Pygmies. Anyone who is into strong power pop and great backing vocals will wanna be all over this. Bands from Canada are just better. Here is another shining example.  –frame (Self-released)


PUSRAD:
Modern Anatomi: 7” EP
Another salvo of hits from a cabal of punkers responsible for Swedish hardcore darlings Raped Teenagers as well as more current bands like Flakes and TV Eye. As can be expected given their pedigree, what yer getting is first class ADD-core tunes—the longest here clocks in at an epic minute-and-change—delivered tight as nails with rhythmic hiccups abounding, but blink and it’s time to flip the disc over.  –jimmy (Signaler Fran Ovan)


PRINCE:
Self-titled: 7”
So yeah, they named themselves Prince. Why? Bunch of stoners. I don’t usually like something this poppy, but, damn, I think this is good. Clean, melodic, and incredibly catchy, especially “Young Americans” on Side A. It’s probably their best song on this 7”. I can say, though, after playing a couple shows with these guys, they really do possess the “it” factor live: the energy, talent, and rawness is not captured in this recording. They are way the fuck better than this recording, so I’m looking forward to what’s next for them.  –Camylle Reynolds (No Breaks)


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·OLD FLINGS
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·Record Reviews From #42, Part 3 of 3
·Poser Disposer, SMD, Retaliate, and Eat the Living
·ANNIHILATION TIME
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·TOUGH TITTIE
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