Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

CUSTOM FIT:
Self-titled: 12” LP
Female-fronted oi works for me. The focus here is good fucking music rather than all the macho baggage that can, unfortunately, come along with the scene. It’s a sound reminiscent of late-’90s street punk bands like Reducers SF and One Man Army. This is street punk with a touch of soul and a bit of style.  –John Mule (Chapter 11 / Pirates Press)


CRY!, THE:
Dangerous Game: LP
This is just a damn fine glammy power pop record from this Portland, OR band. The sound is basically a middle ground between The Biters and The Exploding Hearts, but, of course, not nearly at the level of either of those two bands. Still, a power pop record that even grabs my attention anymore is something noteworthy. It seems so simple: just write great songs that are catchy and full of hooks. Yet it seems that excellent songwriting, great vocals, and strong playing have somehow become one of the rarest beasts in all of current music. The Cry! write excellent power pop songs with great hooks. Highest possible recommendation.  –frame (Taken By Surprise)


CROISSANTS, THE:
We’re in the Basement: 7”
The idea of leaving the audience wanting more taken to the extreme: there’s more runoff groove than content on this one, what with less than ninety seconds of the title track and two sub-minute burners on Side B. Not a bad strategy, all told, as I’m curious to see where the band goes from here: buzzsaw three-chord punk pop with distinctly Dan Vapid-ish vox cutting through the din.  –Michael T. Fournier (Hella Mad)


CREEPS, THE:
Eulogies: CD/LP
How many bands is Skottie Lobotomy in? The Visitors, Crusades, and The Creeps? I’m sure I’m missing some. The point is that the dude is prolific. And while I didn’t care for The Visitors, I love Crusades. Of the three vocalists for Crusades, Skottie’s definitely my favorite, so I was curious to see what The Creeps would sound like. It’s more like The Visitors, reminding me of a lot of 1990s pop punk, although I can’t quite put my finger on who exactly they sound like, which in my book is a good thing. Skottie utilizes the “woah-oh” to a fair degree, but it’s not overdone. Lyrically, it’s certainly more serious than The Visitors. While the lyrics are abstract, they’re a little darker. I can still dig ‘em, though. The biggest thing that struck me about Eulogies is how catchy it is. Within five listens I had a number of the songs stuck in my head. By ten listens I was singing them in the shower. Ten songs in twenty-seven minutes is the perfect length— just enough to make me want more. Ottawa does it again!  –kurt (It’s Alive)


COURTNEYS, THE:
Lost Boys: Cassette
All-female three-piece from Vancouver, British Columbia, following their debut full-length with a cassingle about the undead. The steady drums and effects pedals verge into less harsh Sonic Youth territory. Think the steady “Teenage Riot” build it, build it, build it climax of feelings until the chorus explodes and you’re dancing alone in your room screaming “VAMPIRE TEENAGE BOYFRIEND!” over and over again with the beat, so loudly and with such passion that your mom thinks you have finally lost it. A+. –Alanna Why (Burger)


CHET KNIGHT AND THE NO DISCIPLES:
Self-titled: 7”
I grew up on Adolf And The Piss Artists and that band had a profound impact on me. Their one consistent member, (who also did a stint in the Templars) Chet Knight is taking a little bit of a departure with this new project, and when this record came in the mail I didn’t know what to expect. “(If You’re a Rebel) Rebel,” is closer to his stuff in APA, as it has a strong UK82 influence like Special Duties or Partisans in the backbeat, but delivered with his signature growl. The other three songs are him finding a new home in a sound that runs a huge gamut of influences, but works cohesively when filtered through his experience. I hear a lot of pub rock in these songs as well as a strong influence from bands like Small Faces or Humble Pie. It’s funny to point that out because I don’t think these songs necessarily sound like those bands, but the arrangements are pointing in that direction (as well as the minor-key vocal melodies). “All I Need Is,” has a strong Springsteen vibe in the backbeat and vocal delivery, but it’s still so rough around the edges. Imagine a very dark, slowed down version of APA where the band moved in a more mature direction and you have a little bit of an idea about how these songs may sound. The lyrics on this record are top-notch and very personal. These are the kinds of songs that get stuck in your head and when you put the record on, you sit and really listen to it instead of just bobbing your head and telling your friends about the heavy jams. I don’t know if this is an ongoing project or just a one-off and I know that there have been a lot of personal struggles with Chet over the last couple of years, but I sincerely hope this is something that keeps going because this 7” is an indicator something great that could come down the road.  –Ian Wise (45 Revolutions, SoundCloud.com/Chet-Knight)


CHANNEL 3:
History: 7”
History is another winner by these vets, showcasing a band that’s been cranking out anthems for so long they’ve got it down to a science—hooks aplenty, singalong choruses, and all the subtle bits that color the whole thing in. The flip is a serviceable, if wholly unnecessary, cover of AC/DC’s “Kicked in the Teeth.”  –jimmy (Hostage)


CHAD VANGAALEN:
Shrink Dust: CD/LP
Chad Vangaalen has called this his country album, but don’t be fooled: the use of his newly acquired pedal steel isn’t overly extensive and when it is used it’s effective. With twelve songs clocking in at forty-two minutes, Shrink Dust is the perfect length. While it’s more sedate than past albums and not nearly as weird (there’s no song titled anything as outrageous as “Shave My Pussy,” for example), it’s still got Vangaalen’s flavor of falsetto vocals, bleeps and bloops from keyboards, and an almost hypnotic beat in some songs. Many of them are tinged with sadness, more so than previous releases. (Who knew that a song about a dead dog [“Lila”] could be such a bummer?) His lyrics are still offbeat and unique: “Let’s get high on other people’s dreams” (“Frozen Paradise”) and “Cut off both my hands and threw them in the sand / Watch them swim away from me like a pair of bloody crabs” (“Cut Off My Hands”) are just two such examples. Due to the mellowness and lack of complexity, this is easily Vangaalen’s most accessible album, but it’s still got enough of his psychedelic folk influence to mean this will never be mainstream. That’s fine by me. This will be our secret pop record.  –kurt (Sub Pop)


CAPITALIST KIDS, THE:
At a Loss: CD
I recognize that Razorcake covers pop punk and that it’s still a thing and people are into that thing, and that’s great. I just feel very removed from that world. The Capitalist Kids have a name from a punk band name generator and songs that match, I suppose. If you close your eyes and think “pop punk,” you can hear the entire album, which is more of an issue than the “coolness” problem they address on their opening track (“Not ‘95”). But maybe there is no problem here. I’m with them politically, if not at all aesthetically. They’re having fun, it’s their world. Meanwhile: I’m thirty-four, and I spent the morning reading Blood Meridian and listening to the Bill Evans Trio and Miles Davis. What do I do with this?  –Matt Werts (It’s Alive / Toucan Play)


BUM CITY SAINTS:
New Beginnings: 7”
I don’t know if it was because of the three-word name with “city” in the middle, or because it was on Pirates Press, but I was really expecting some oi/street punk stuff. I was wrong. BumCity Saints have got something going on that I want to call “melodic hardcore” but that conjures up the wrong image. They’re a hardcore punk band with melody. They’ve got raw guitars and vocals to match. There are choruses that you can sing along to and breakdowns and speed-ups that you can spill your beer in the pit to. I really, really like this!  –ty (Pirates Press)


BOTTLENOSE KOFFINS:
Gayzilla: LP
I wanted to hate this. The band name is not clever enough to make sense, I find the artwork lacking, and I guess I’m just PC enough to find the title Gayzilladistasteful. And who wants to review a surf band? There is not much to write about a surf band other than, “they play surf.” However, Bottlenose Koffins (ugh) deliver a debut LP that is more than tolerable. Mix traditional surf rock, the punk stupidity of Masked Intruder, and lots of shout-along choruses (“Kristy Yamaguchi…I wanna go out and skate!”) and you’ve got a band that would probably be lots of fun for dancing on tables and smashing bottles in your local watering hole. You gotta spin it to win it, so that’ll teach me to judge a book by its cover.  –Matt Seward (Get Weird!)


BOMBSITE:
1994: CD
This limited edition CD was released in conjunction with the Extreme Noise Records Twentieth Anniversary show, which reunited many of the bands that were rocking the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul in the mid-’90s to celebrate the longevity of my favorite record store. Bombsite was one of those bands. Two things are important: First is how not-twenty-years-old this music sounds. Second is the way this band tapped into a style that has weaved its way through the Twin Cities punk scene since the beginning. You’ve probably heard it. It’s that torn jeans, calloused hands, playing our hearts out, hopeful for sunny days sound that continues to hold sway in this region to this day. This style feels right here, where winters are so dark and crushing. These sounds feel warm, and Bombsite made these sounds so well, adding their own unique touch. I love that I can now listen to this and think about how generation after generation, the kids in Minneapolis and St. Paul climb out of their homes and slide through January winters into cinder block basements, still wearing their jackets, just excited to jump around and raise fists and have fun and survive another year.  –mp (Self-released)


BOB MOULD:
Beauty and Ruin: CD/LP
Bob Mould’s last album, Silver Age, was a surprising success. It showed a return to some great rock and roll, reminiscent of the high points from his days in Sugar. His latest, Beauty and Ruin, features two pictures of him on the cover; one from his Hüsker Dü days and one from the present day. While I’m not sure if it was intentional, it’s an interesting contrast because it seems as if Mould is still drawing from his days with Hüsker Dü and Sugar, bands that he played in back in the 1980s and ‘90s. The sound can be fast and aggressive (“Kid with Crooked Face”) or more introspective and somber (“Let the Beauty Be”), but it all works well. Mould has stated that the twelve songs are broken down into four sections of three songs each: loss, reflection, acceptance, and future. Each of these sections deals with the aftermath of losing his father in 2012. Once you know that was what Mould was attempting, it opens up the album to a different interpretation. There start to be themes between the songs and the lyrics speak to the listener in an additional manner. It’s not a concept album per se, but it is a look at the aftermath of loss. Mould still knows how to play fast, the backing band of Jon Wurster and Jason Narducy is tight as ever, and the songs have great pop hooks. I have a soft spot for Sugar’s File Under Easy Listening (I know—I’m the only one) and the Hüsker Dü material is legendary, but Bob Mould’s solo material is still much better than the vast majority of music I hear on a regular basis. Anyone who has ever liked a Bob Mould project should pick this up.  –kurt (Merge)


BIG EYES:
Almost Famous: LP
This trio of Seattle-based badasses has released their second LP, Almost Famous, and I am more smitten than ever. Honest lyrics with obvious “fuck you” undertones, riffs that make you want to dance until you’re covered in your own vomit, and hooks that sink into your skin before pulling you into the deep, dark ocean of Big Eyes. Don’t resist, just let it take you.  –Genevieve Armstrong (Grave Mistake)


BIG BOYS:
No Matter How Long the Line at the Cafeteria, There’s Always a Seat: LP
For me, choosing a favorite Big Boys album would be like asking a parent to choose their favorite child. They all have different qualities that you admire but at the end of the day you love them all the same. This is the reissue of the Big Boys’ third and final album. It features two of my all-time favorite Big Boys songs (“Narrow View” and “Which Way to Go”), but let’s face it, they are all good songs. As usual, Light In The Attic has pulled out all the stops for their Big Boys discography reissues. A thick stock, gatefold cover with amazing photos, stickers, original liner notes, and, hell, the mail order edition even came with a T-shirt! I’ve said it before and I will say it again; if you don’t have this band in your life, you best remedy that. Life changing!  –ty (Light In The Attic)


BIG BOYS:
Lullabies Help the Brain Grow: LP
It’s no secret how much Austin Texas’ Big Boys mean to me. I’ve shouted it from the rooftops and in these very pages, and if I keep getting the opportunity to write reviews of killer reissues of their albums, then damn it I’m going to! Lullabies is the Big Boys’ second album and it really built on the foundation that was created with their debut LP Industry Standard/Where’s My Towel. To my knowledge, there is no band that has ever been able to straddle so many separate styles with such amazing results. From the hardcore blasts of “Brickwall” and “Assault” to the funkiness of “Jump the Fence.” From the off-kilter menace of “Baby Let’s Play God” or “Manipulation” to the pure majesty of “Sound on Sound”… It doesn’t take a super fan to know that this is one of the most important bands in punk rock history… Scratch that. Music history. The reissue has been given the usual Light In The Attic treatment, which means it’s phenomenal! A gatefold cover with an amazing, never-before-published photo of the band sweating it out on stage. You must have this. If I had the money, I’d buy everyone copies of their entire discography.  –ty (Light In The Attic)


BETRAYERS:
Let the Good Times Die: Cassette
This full album (thirteen songs and bonus fourteen on the digital download you get with the tape) of psychedelic music from a garage somewhere in Edmonton, Alberta wins the award for best tambourine use of 2014. Like many, I’m at the point where many new garage psych bands are all starting to melt into one and sound the same to me, but there’s something distinct about this tape. Maybe I’m just giving them points for incorporating a fuzzed-out harmonica and slide-guitar into the album. But you should get points for that.  –Bianca (Shake!)


BEASTMAN:
Self-titled: Cassette
Beastman are interstellar cavemen and Vikings and ravers, and it would be fair to say they’re the best hardcore band in the world. They’re Funkadelic and Sun Ra and Wrangler Brutes and Nation Of Ulysses and early Meat Puppets and DRI. Their only peers are legends and ghosts. They’re crawling around this planet, being dragged to the stage in chains, showing us their butts, not doing their laundry, losing their minds under bridges, electing rock’n’roll to the white house, and somehow somebody recorded them, and now it’s on a tape, and now you’re buying that tape.  –Matt Werts (Jelly Music)


BEARMACE:
Cold Ones: 7”
This band from Montreal offers 4 songs of tough metal influenced hardcore punk. A general lack of information included with this release doesn’t offer any clues to what these guys are all about, but most fans of gnarly ‘80s influenced hardcore should dig this.  –Mark Twistworthy (Zaxxon)


BANNER PILOT:
Souvenir: CD
You have to deal with the fact that the soles of your favorite low top Chucks will eventually blow out. Yes, they were your favorite, the most comfortable thing in your wardrobe, and made you feel like you were earning scads of punk points, but at some point you will have to purchase a new pair. Souveniris an amalgamation of forgettable Unfun-era Jawbreaker wannabe tunes anchored by that familiar Bauermeister bass tone (“Heat Rash,” “Shoreline”). The wind up octaves of the first bridge in “Colfax” are the first things that pique interest. It’s the ninth song. I like Banner Pilot. A lot. But when there are only three songs in slots nine, ten, and eleven of a twelve track album that actually sound on par with the band’s past work… sorry, guys. Pass.  –Matt Seward (Fat)


BABYSITTER / MONSTER TREASURE:
Split: Cassette
It’s always a little awkward when I get sent something from Razorcake that involves friends of mine. On one hand a bias exists, but on the other I want to share any awesomeness that is coming from my area of this small world of ours. Fuck it, here goes. Shake! is a cool label in Victoria that is working hard to put out vinyl and cassettes with all kinds of different, fun stuff. This is a split tape between Babysitter and Monster Treasure. My tape player sucks ass so I hope I am talking about the right bands. Babysitter is rocking some fuzzed-out garage-pop steeped heavily in early ‘90s alt rock. Monster Treasure could actually use the exact same description that I just used for Babysitter yet they sound completely different. That’s weird. I like both of these bands.  –ty (Shake!)


AUTISTIC YOUTH:
Nonage: LP
At first blush, this sounds like yer average thud-punk stomper for which Dirtnap seems to have a soft spot, and there is definitely enough of that here to serve as a base. Pay attention, though, and you quickly find they’re hurling a ton of other influences at yer noggin—subtle drone leads, Spector-like bell accents, some metal-tinged guitar duo-leads, multi-part harmonies, and no small amount of dark pop hooks dipped in post-punk eccentricity—all the while keeping the rhythms insistent and pounding. Just when ye think a subgenre’s on the verge of finally burning out, someone adds a new wrinkle. Kudos for some fine work.  –jimmy (Dirtnap)


AUSMUTEANTS:
Amusements: LP
When I see a new Goner Records release, I think it will sound like one of two things: blown-out garage punk or quirky Aussie/New Zealand synth-y stuff. And I’ll probably just buy it because I know I’ll like it. Goner is one of the few labels throughout my entire record buying career that I’ll buy something just because they put it out. Ausmuteants falls into this second sound-type. Goner has been advertising this upcoming release for a while but I never got around to previewing them online. (Something I go back and forth in my mind as being totally against my record buying impulses and as wholly practical because I’m getting older, own a home, have bills, like to travel, blah, blah, blargh.) Mostly up-tempo numbers (“Kicked in the Head by a Horse” is best) and one moody, Clean-ish jam (“Hate This Town.”) My Aussie/NZ palette is limited, so other influences are likely going over my head. Oh well, better for the enjoyment of this record as it stands, then. Goner Records, just open an Australian branch already!  –Sal Lucci (Goner)


ATLANTIC THRILLS:
Self-titled: CD
It never ceases to amaze me how many new bands (re: ones that I actually enjoy) emerge from the East Coast on an almost daily basis. Atlantic Thrills are no exception to the rule. Solid, catchy ‘60s garage/psych. Not unlike The Black Lips, as much as it pains me to go there. Yet, they have their own thing going for them; far from a carbon copy. Well recorded and distanced from anything too psyched-out. The songs are straight forward, but far from boring. Definitely closer to ATL’s masters themselves, rather than Demon’s Claws or Dead Ghosts, for example. “Day at the Beach,” is a hell of a track. If you’re a fan of the genre, you’ve probably already acquired this sucker. If not, what’re you waiting for?  –Steve Adamyk (Almost Ready)


ARMADA, LA:
Crisis: 12” EP
The intensity of a Costa Rican Bad Brains weaned on Dillinger Escape Plan but actually producing memorable hardcore, La Armada will burn your show space down with sheer power and technical virtuosity. Six tracks, including a Bad Brains medley, that swing from shred to breakdown while keeping the actual tunes fresh in your mind. The group is now based in Chicago, but with song titles like “Vincho Leonelista” and “Obsolescencia,” one is lead to believe La Armada is still writing lyrics with their distinct South American perspective, but lacking a lyric sheet, a listener has no way of verifying. However, pre-orders did come with a bonus Unbaptismal Certificate, solidifying their vocal distaste for organized Christian religion. Snatch this one up.  –Matt Seward (Fat Sandwich, fatsandwichrecords.com / Profane Existence, profaneexistence.com / Puercords)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937 938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 947 948 949 950 951 952 953 954 955 956 957 958 959 960 961 962 963 964 965 966 967 968 969 970 971 972 973 974

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player


·FEVER FEVER
·CHUCK RAGAN
·LEATHERFACE
·CRITICAL CONVICTIONS
·ZAO
·ELECTRIC EYE, THE
·Tales of the Unexplained
·YOUR PEST BAND/ EINE KLEINE CHINMUZIK
·SAINTE CATHERINES, THE


If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2015 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.