Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine Welcome to Razorcake | DIY Punk Music | Punk Bands | Punk Rock Bands | Punk Magazine
 

























Record Reviews

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Below are some recently posted reviews.

RSS Feed

AK-47:
Garden City: CD
Hardcore. Passionate, pissed off, pummeling hardcore. A few ripping metallic solos and a few catchy breakdowns keep it interesting. Good thing there’s a lyric sheet, these guys have something worthwhile to say, with songs about Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin and other victims less known but with equally fucked up stories. With apologies to my Floridian friends, the best song title and concept here is “Annihilate Florida.” Go see these Victoria, B.C. Canadians and pick this up.  –Chad Williams (Self-released)


ABOLITIONIST / RUBRICS:
Split: 7”
There’s no two ways about it, Abolitionist has once again raised its game based on the three tracks on this split—it’s like the band has undergone some big transformation and these songs blow away everything else that has gone before. I love the power and drive in these songs and it’s making me excited for the new album, Pathogen, due out later this year. Rubrics offer up five tracks of energetic punk rock that bring to mind a host of bands from the Lookout! explosion of the 1980s / 1990s, including Crimpshine and Operation Ivy, where attitude and endeavor found favor over a pristine sound—the best stuff I’ve heard from this band too.  –Rich Cocksedge (1859 / Different Kitchen)


ZIPGUN BOMBER:
Paper Airplanes: CDEP
Nate Doyle (ex-Guts) switches from bass to guitar and starts a pop punk trio that has a spring in their step. It’s catchy and hard-driving punk that will get your blood pumping when you crank this up. The five songs included go by in a flash. But there’s not a stinker in the bunch, and when the last song trots out an acoustic, you may be reaching for the Kleenex. High quality and worthy of your attention.  –koepenick (King Yum)


ZATOPEKS:
About Bloody Time: CD
Finally…Zatopeks are back with more of their high energy pop punk. Singer Will DeNiro’s snarly delivery almost gives the songs a Buzzcocks feel at times but as a whole they stick with the mid-tempo, polished sound they’re famous for. Some of the songs veer off their usual path like “Acetate” which has a definite ‘50s vibe to it or “Life Is Elsewhere” with its New Model Army type intro. They also show a hint of streetrock in songs “Wait For The Fall” and “Chequerboard”. All in all, another solid effort from these U.K. punks. The catchy, solid punk tunes included here made the wait for this new album well worth it.  –Brent Nimz (It’s Alive)


YOUNG IDEA, THE:
Warpaint: 7” EP
This debut release from these Bay Area punks fuckin’ rips! From what I’ve read, the members of the band have all paid their dues in other outfits and have now come together to create this monster they call The Young Idea. The four songs included on this vinyl spinner are all punk as fuck but with a ska dynamic added for good measure. The main riff of the opening song “Citadel” has an early Down By Law sound to it complete with a Dave Smalley style vocal delivery. The title track “Warpaint” has a strong ska punk presence with a gorgeous guitar melody throughout. “Wretch Like Me” hits hard musically with a chorus that is both potent and memorable. The song “Santa Cruz” starts with an almost surf style intro but quickly picks up the pace during the verses only to break down for a brilliant sing-a-long chorus. Truly, one of the best releases I’ve heard this year. Looking forward to hearing more from this band.  –Brent Nimz (Chapter Eleven)


WOVENHAND:
Refractory Obdurate: CD/LP
Wovenhand is the vehicle by which Denver’s David Eugene Edwards shares his spiritual message of both god’s love and his judgment. It’s dark American gothic music with heavy doses of punk, world, native, and Americana influences. While those sounds are there on his latest album, Refractory Obdurate, this is by far the heaviest and most aggressive album he’s ever released. This is appropriate since he’s now releasing music on the metal label Deathwish. It’s also appropriate because his four-piece band now includes two members of Planes Mistaken For Stars: Chuck French and Neil Keener. But it’s Ordy Garrison’s drumming that drives many of the heavier songs. It isn’t complex, but it’s compelling, and gives the songs backbone unlike anything else heard before in Wovenhand’s music. Imagine NickCave fronting a stomping, balls-out rocking punk band. While I would normally cringe at lyrics about god, Edwards’ words are never fake—he’s sincere about his beliefs but is just telling his tale. He isn’t out to win an argument or convert anyone. Edwards is the musical version of nineteenth-century abolitionist John Brown. His sound and music are dark, heavy, and laden with a message about god’s glory and judgment, and he really doesn’t care who likes it. Thankfully for all of us, it’s excellent. I can only imagine how good this is live.  –kurt (Deathwish)


WORRIERS:
Sinead O’ Rebellion: 7”
Infectious melodies and clear, catchy lyrics merge together with a sound rhythm section, led by a powerful voice and crisp lead guitar parts. Worriers remind me a lot of The Measure [sa]. Undulating vocals that come at you full force but never loose tone or inflection. Songs are about growing up in a state of rebellion and keeping sight of your values, even if they’re alternative ones. In the title track of the release, singer Lauren Denitzio proclaims: “I align myself with the likes of those who rip up photos on broadcast TV / speaking truthfully isn’t quite as easy as making your family happy.” Worriers seem to be driven mostly by Denitzio, who wrote all the tracks on the release and plays lead guitar, though the other three musicians are not lacking any relevance in the band. Beautiful guitar solos wail throughout the record on the wings of the steady and melodic rhythm section with great talent. “Get Bored” is one of the best break up songs I’ve heard in a long time. “When I’m working my way up, you’re hanging with a scum punk / it’s all a turn off / it doesn’t matter anyway / you’ve got the good times, I’ve got my Chinese take-away.” I love that it’s an open-ended song about relationships in general; friend fall outs are just as harsh as break ups. There is a gorgeous lyrical cadence that travels the length of this release which got me singing along on the first listen. They won me over with this 7” and I’m eagerly looking forward to what they do in the future.  –Kayla Greet (Yo Yo)


WORKIN’ STIFFS, THE:
My Ghetto: 7”
A sort-of reissue of an excellent EP from these San Francisco Bay Area streetpunk stalwarts. Originally released by Radio Records in 2004, it appears they had some leftover records, made some new sleeves and re-released them under the revived Chapter 11 label. Ain’t nothin’ wrong with a little recycling. This was the Workin’ Stiffs’ last release, and it’s a solid final batch of songs. See these fucks at the bar, ‘cause they rarely play anymore.  –Chad Williams (Chapter 11)


WE MUST DISMANTLE ALL THIS!:
Decathect: LP
Fucking exhausting listening to this LP. Relentless. Fast, ripping anarcho-crust-thrash hardcore punk. Doubled up on both vocals and bass drum, the sound is like a rising tsunami that wipes out everything in its path. Harsh, throat-heavy growling, slick metal guitar riffs, pounding drums. Hold tight and dig your fingernails in, this might just wipe you out.  –Camylle Reynolds (Dead Rodent)


WARTHOG:
Prison: EP
Dirty, ugly, hardcore, Poison Idea by way of Cleveland. A less hardcore Gordon Solie or Inmates maybe? Tougher than Hoax, but having that same blown-out weirdo vibe as those fellow East Coasters. Hard as fuck. Feeling it. When you think it’s all been done, it comes back again, uglier, and harder. Bet this shit annihilates live.  –Tim Brooks (Iron Lung)


VERBAL ABUSE:
Just an American Band: LP
Don’t have this yet? You gotta get it. I guarantee this will be a permanent part of your collection. One you will put on the turntable in another forty years and get the same rush you did as the first time you listened to it. This is hardcore punk from San Francisco 1983, featuring Nicki Sicki (from one of my all time favorite bands, Sick Pleasure) on vocals. This is the sound that had Okies like me dreaming of “the good life” in California. Pure hardcore that is dirty and dangerous-sounding, and it makes you feel alive and invincible. Back when bands lived it and breathed it. The songs are fast and yet catchy and tuneful without being corny or wimpy. The crashing tempo of “I Don’t Need It” is great, as well as the way Nicki Sicki delivers the lyric, “You’re Shit!” in “Verbal Abuse.” Such a great album.  –Matt Average (Beer City)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Without Kibou There Is Nothing Vol. 2: 7”
Kibou Records has been pumping vinyl and tapes out of England since 2011. Along the way, they’ve been using the Without Kibou There Is Nothing series as a twelve-minute showcase for groups from across the land. In part two of the series, the A-Side features heavier acts like grind group Social Rut’s 40-second pummel, “Wreck / Logic,” and hardcore band Albion’s “Black Charcoal Lungs,” which has an evil guitar hook pulsing out some lovely, dirty melody: a little Gallows, a little Pixies—looks bad on paper but tastes great. The satisfyingly bizarre Autopsy Boys make Side-B appreciably weirder, blending post-punk with synth effects, holding the cheese, and featuring a frontman who sounds like a sort of Zero Boys’ Paul Mahern if he were singing in 2079 instead of 1979. Or, you know, Robocop punk. The steady pop beat of Second In Line close out the EP with a list song recalling dead celebrities—”Walt Disney is Dead…/lots of Lassies are dead”— human and otherwise. All side, a nice tour of an EP. Now get on your baby brother’s computer and do the Google math— £4 is only $6.72, you can afford that. Optional white vinyl and included digital download.  –Jim Joyce (Kibou)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
To Live a Lie Records Volume II: LP
Close to thirty tracks of some of the best current grind and powerviolence bands going right now. The track listing is a good mix of well-known bands of the genre (Weekend Nachos, Sick/Tired, etc.) and some relatively unknown bands that are good (and lucky?) enough to warrant inclusion on the disc. It’s definitely a good representation of the scene and serves well as a go-to educational piece for people trying to get a crash course in the scene, but for those of us that follow the grind/PV scene there are still plenty of good reasons to pick this thing up (last recording by Vaccine and the first vinyl appearance of Alabama’s Slave are worth the price alone). To Live A Lie are already at the top of extreme hardcore scene and this document is another welcome addition to their growing catalog of top-notch records.  –Ian Wise (To Live A Lie)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Influence: A Tribute to Big Boys: LP
A long-overdue tribute record to one of the most prolific punk bands of our time. The Big Boys mean a whole lot to a whole lot of people and reading the introductions submitted from nearly every band gives you even more insight into just how powerful their music is even after all these years since their inactivity and the untimely passing of vocalist Randy “Biscuit” Turner. I’d like to start off by complimenting the astonishingly beautiful album artwork courtesy of Big Boys guitarist Tim Kerr. This particular copy is one of the limited versions with spray paint stenciled art and on coke bottle-colored vinyl. The album as a whole is completely listenable from start to finish without a single disappointing / mangling moment to be heard. Toys That Kill lead off the festivities and give “Nervous” a shot in the arm with their off-kilter San Pedro style stomp. Night Birds swoop down from Jersey and super-charge their version of “Wise Up.” Mind Spiders update the television viewing audiences’ favorites while adding some weirdo synth into their rendition of “TV.” Other personal favorites include, but are not limited to, Spokenest, Drunk Injuns, Tight Lips, The Nervous, Low Culture, and Riverboat Gamblers with their superb take on perhaps the most beautifully melancholy Big Boys song “Sound on Sound.” Gary Floyd (The Dicks frontman, longtime friend, and co-performer) provides some touching and heartfelt words for Biscuit and for the Big Boys, in general as a band, whose time and place happenstance simply cannot and will not be replicated. Their existence as a live act is something that very few fortunate souls can vividly recall. For the rest of us, there’s stories and online video footage to keep us happy and now there’s also this record to remind us that we’re all in this together and in great company as fans, admirers, and artists. Fun, fun, and more fucking fun! Biscuit would be proud.  –Juan Espinosa (Stiff Hombre)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Emotional Response Box of Tricks: 5 x 7”EP
What can I say about this truly rad indie box set of five colored vinyl EPs, full of stickers, badges, and pins from Emotional Response? It’s like Christmas. But through the eyes of a bushytailed-big-eyed youngster, and not the cynical thirty-something asshole-humbug I’ve become. Records can have that effect on me. Box stars Kickback$, The Safe Distance, Hulaboy, Cheap Red, Thee Headless Kings, and Shindaggers. Indie darlings Stewart Anderson and Jen Turrell from Boyracer make their appearance on almost all five EPs. What’s more prolific than an English man in the desert? Nothing. Only one hundred available; possibly sold out by the time you get wind of this. If not, get it.  –Camylle Reynolds (Emotional Response)


VARIOUS ARTISTS:
Aperiodic, Mala In Se, Joe 4, Knife The Symphony: 2 x 7”
Whoa! This is a complete stinker. It has this weird 1990s nostalgia about it, where the record is like a sampler of some of the many sounds of that bygone decade. You have a band like Joe 4, who sound like they really like Shellac, but are so blinded in their fandom, they don’t quite realize that one of the reason Shellac was a good band was because they were original. Knife The Symphony are bland “post hardcore” wanking. Mala In Se remind me of all the bands that clogged up the first few years of the Ebullition mail order catalog, the kind of records that take up a lot of space in today’s record cut out bins. Aperiodic want to push at the constraints, and even if they were to be successful, who would notice?  –Matt Average (Phratry)


VÅNNA INGET:
Ingen Botten: LP
My punk jadedness to polished music left me unprepared for the ghostlike precision of each haunting note on Ingen Botten. I’m glad that I don’t understand a bit of Swedish (although I was tempted to read some butchered Google translations), because I’m better able to appreciate Karolina Engdahl’s sorrowful crooning. The fast songs are post-punk infused power pop, like Red Dons, complete with hi-hat-driven dance beats and bold choruses that seductively lick your eardrums. But with a decisive swoop, Vånna Inget dives into darker melodies instilled with the goth flair of Siouxsie And The Banshees. Karolina beckons alongside the brooding organ which is never sugary. Instead, the keys drip into doom-y beats while the restrained guitars reverberate over the deliberate, ambling bass lines. It comes as no surprise that these folks were nominated for a Swedish Grammy, as this album is utterly high drama: bold, distinct, grandiose. Are the Grammys worth even a smidgen of interest? Nope. But Vånna Inget do deserve tons of kudos for this exceptionally crafted LP. Recommended.  –Sean Arenas (Man In Decline)


VANILLA MUFFINS:
The Triumph of Sugar Oi!: CD
Another “best of” (this makes five, by my count) from these cats, this time with a large chunk of tunes from their The Drug Is Football LP joining the lineup with older fare. Seems a bit overkill, yes, but I reckon if you’re looking for a quick taste of what they do, and the other four collections are unavailable, this’ll do nicely. Here, you get fourteen tracks of their “sugar oi” sound—heaping piles of pop-laden punk ditties owing more to Slade than Last Resort, with full-ring guitars aplenty and huge, anthemic hooks just a-dripping off the disc. Vanilla Muffins have long been a guilty pleasure of mine, and this does nothing to diminish that in any way.  –jimmy (Spirit Of The Streets)


UNDERCLASS U.K.:
Not in My Name: CD
These guys started in the ‘80s but went on a massive hiatus after their guitar player got arrested on drugs charges. They’re from Barking, the same place that hatched Billy Bragg. The lyrics have the same class-conscious—if much less poetic—outlook on life. The music is what you’d expect from a band with U.K. in their name—mid-tempo street punk a la U.K. Subs or Chaos U.K. (Oh wait, there’s Chameleons U.K. and The Mission U.K., too. This band is nothing like that.) The vocals are rawer on some tracks, which set them apart from the rest of the street punk pack. On other tracks, there is some kind of weird effect applied which makes them sound muddy. Not so fast but plenty furious, this is the perfect soundtrack for plotting your next act of civil disobedience.  –Lisa Weiss (Punk Lives Live)


TV FREAKS:
Leeches: 7”
Holy. Fucking. Shit. Did I just get rammed into by a truck? Whereas TV Freaksʼ last record was at least somewhat polished sounding, this 7” is just pure disgusting, spit in your eyeballs filth. Leeches sounds like what insanity feels like: the vocals intense shouts, the guitars deranged and the drums flailing and crashing. These three tracks are guaranteed to scare your parents, even if they’re the hip ones who buy fair-trade coffee and listen to the morning show on campus radio. If you thought Strange Attractor was the only Canadian outfit making maniacal punk noise, you need to turn your knob onto TV Freaks, one of the few punk bands making the genre a fucking threat again. A.  –Alanna Why (Hosehead)


TSUNAMIS, THEE:
Delirium and Dark Waters: 7”
Seriously awesome female lo-fi, garagey surf rock with lots of reverb. The first track opens with a dark and heavy bass rumbling in for a measure or two and is quickly joined by twangy, bright guitar and high-pitched squeals. The drums are tight, controlled, and way mellow compared to the smorgasbord of chaotic sounds from the rest of the band. Thee Headcoatees meets The Cramps with four songs about haunted houses, hanging at the swamp, spell casters, and psycho lovers that will creepy crawl right into your head. For a three piece band, they sound incredibly full and while the riffs used are pretty common in surf rock, they’re not normally played at this speed and with such frantic excitement. Thee Tsunamis are ‘60s mod, surf, and horror punk all at once and they manage to make all their elements extremely enjoyable.  –Kayla Greet (Magnetic South)


TRUBBEL:
Gör Om Gör Rätt: 7”
The Swedes sure have a way of nailing the sounds of U.S. rock’n’roll and yet making it their own. Trubbel plays catchy, straight-up Chuck Berry via Johnny Thunders sassy punk rock that sounds a lot like fellow Swedes Knugen Faller with lower register male vocals but the same amount of sass. My gut tells me that Trubbel likely puts on one hell of a live show, too.  –Dave Williams (Alleycat)


TERMINUS:
Going Nowhere Fast: CD
Reissue of a 1990 record from this English band, a band I’ve never heard before and a fascinating listen. Musically, it covers a lot of territory, from speedy hardcore to slow, dark, doomy punk, to melodic mid-tempo punk, all with a constant undercurrent of classic crust. Oh, and some very un-technical metal solos. There’s a sprawling, epic nature to this very raw record that adds some weight to the very political lyrical content, sung with a lead vocal that’s sort of The Baron-meets-Dave Vanian. Sounds like a mix of various recording sessions, and they needed to use an original vinyl copy to create this reissue, so sound quality is average, but definitely does not detract from the content whatsoever. A nice surprise of a record and something I’d seek out a vinyl copy of if it wasn’t so rare. Fans of bands from Amebix to Chron Gen: get this now.  –Chad Williams (Bosstuneage Retro)


TEENGENERATE:
Five Covers: 7”
Cover projects can be throwaway vinyl at times, but Teengenerate bring their blazing train wreck speed to DMZ’s “Boy from Nowhere,” The Real Kids’ “She’s Alright,” and The Pagans’ “And Change.” Good taste and crowd pleasers don’t always translate to vinyl, but these three tracks create serious rattlehead in the comfort of your own home. The Queer’s “Kicked out of Webelos” and an Elvis cover are only nominal by Teengenerate standards. These tracks are taken from nineteen-year-old demos and show the raw power of a band that everyone should kneel before.  –Billups Allen (Crypt)


TANKIFIED:
Volume I: CD
If you like your generic SoCal-style punk rock with a generous dose of arena hair metal, then run—don’t walk—to get this record. Me, I’m gonna stay where I am. There is cowbell. Lots of it. Guitar solos and effect pedals, oh my! Remember that time Green Day covered The Scorpions? This is like The Scorpions covering Green Day. Well, not even The Scorpions—more like Dokken. If Wal-Mart went into the business of opening dive bars, these guys would be the house band.  –Lisa Weiss (Mystery School)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675 676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 760 761 762 763 764 765 766 767 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 863 864 865 866 867 868 869 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879 880 881 882 883 884 885 886 887 888 889 890 891 892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918 919 920 921 922 923 924 925 926 927 928 929 930 931 932 933 934 935 936 937 938 939 940 941 942 943 944 945 946 947 948 949 950 951 952 953 954 955 956 957 958 959 960 961 962 963 964 965 966 967 968 969 970 971 972 973 974

| 0-9| A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M |

| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z|

Razorcake Podcast Player


·PHOENIX THUNDERSTONE
·TED LEO/PHARMACISTS
·HUDSON FALCONS
·THAT’S JUST WRONG
·APOCALYPSE MEOW/ RATIONAL ANTHEM
·NIGHTMARE BOYZZZ
·Lords of Dogtown
·BOSS MARTIANS
·IMPATIENCE


If you live in the Los Angeles area and want to help us out, let us know.



Get monthly notifications of new arrivals and distro and special offers for being part of the Razorcake army.



 
Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc.
PO Box 42129
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Except for reviews, which appear in both, the
contents of the Razorcake website are completely
different from the contents of Razorcake Fanzine.

© 2001-2015 Razorcake/Gorsky Press, Inc. Privacy Policy

Razorcake.org is made possible in part by grants from
the City of Los Angeles, Department
of Cultural Affairs and is supported
by the Los Angeles County Board of
Supervisors through the Los Angeles
Arts Commission.
Department of Cultural AffairsLos Angeles County Arts Commission


Web site engine code is Copyright © 2003 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.