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Record Reviews

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Below are some recently posted reviews.

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HELLSHOCK:
Low Men in Yellow Cloaks: 7”
Hellshock from Portland are most definitely punks, as evidenced by featuring members of From Ashes Rise and Atrocious Madness, but they’re not fooling anyone: they love them some metal. Two songs of mid-paced fist-bangers which I can only describe as Randy Uchida (G.I.S.M.) fronting a Seasons in the Abyss era Slayer. Fierce, dark, and downright evil; it’s good to see the pacific-northwest isn’t all just post-punk and anti-depressants. Now kiss the goat! –Juan Espinosa (Black Water)


HERO DISHONEST:
Kaikki Hajoaa: 7”
Been at it since 1999, the latest from the Finnish hardcore outfit continues their offensive with five new tracks. Following up last year’s full length, Alle Lujaa,the quartet goes at it entirely in Finnish. The first song brings up Die Kreuzen’s heavy melodic shtick and explodes into demon-conjuring, mic-eating vitriol. “Nälkälakko”—translated as “The Hunger Strike”—is a minute and some change of screamo, eye-bleeding, skull-bashing vocals over doom guitar. “Jumalan Selätys” is part ‘80s U.K. punk with stretched-out guitars and vocals shouted down an elevator shaft then pedaled up to a pit-shoving froth. “Tammikuun Seitsemäs” holds steady like a Black Flag track and hurtles headlong into a metal freak out. Bringing up the rear, the title track, which means “All the Breaks,” brings in elements of The Exploited. Seasoned veterans, the boys showcase their range in five very different tracks. On sturdy, high grade vinyl, this could serve as a great intro to their catalog or simply a balls-to-the-wall addition to your stack. Hardcore doesn’t get better than this. Recommended.  –Kristen K. (Peterwalkee)


HIGH ANXIETY:
Self-titled: LP
This record was recorded in 2012, and the cover was drawn in 2013. It reached me in the middle of 2014. This obviously wasn’t a rush job, but it looks and sounds like one. Eight songs, seven of which are rather whiny country punk. The eighth song is distinct only for the wimpy mock epic metal part. This mess can easily be identified by the crappy comic drawing of dweebs on a roller coaster on the cover. Comes with a download code so you can wonder why you have this on the go. –Vincent Battilana (Bandwagon)


INSTITUTE:
Self-titled: 12” EP
Here are six songs of anarcho-tinged post-punk that would have felt right at home on the A SidesCrass Records compilation (think The Cravats or Omega Tribe) including everything that comes with that: unearthed production values, snare-driven beats, shrapnel guitars, and moody—nearly spoken—vocals. It’s all immediately familiar yet precisely executed. This is another Deranged release that rubs me the right way.  –Sean Arenas (Deranged)


IRON CHIC:
Split N’ Shit: 7”
Iron Chic dole out four songs of that anthemic pop punk that the kids seem to love these days but appears to be lost on me. I don’t want to sound like a complete shithead, but there are just too many bands doing it just like this without doing much else to distinguish themselves from the hordes. If you like the Dopamines, RVIVR, and singalongs, then I’m fairly certain you already love this band. Me, I’ll gladly take my Tenement records and go fuck myself.  –Juan Espinosa (Dead Broke)


IRON CHIC:
The Constant One: LP
Mola Ram reaches into your chestTemple of Doom-style and pulls out your heart. But your heart has been replaced with a rusty can of Frostie brand Blue Cream Soda. Those rusty edges are painful coming out, but inside is pure syrupy goodness. Then the lyrics. Anthems of white hot light shoot from your mouth and eyes like Rene Belloq at the end of Raiders. The Chic has an ability to grab fans from all genres through emotional connection and their ability to write some of the catchiest songs around. There is a guitar pedal that adds a slightly different tone (“Spooky Action”) from the previous full length, but if you’ve kept up with the 7” releases, the progression is natural. The horns, seagulls, and video game keyboard noises for intros and between song space actually add to the anticipation between tracks, as opposed to sounding like filler. Iron Chic encapsulates your worst day as you’re swallowing the spoonful of sugar and asking for more. Every song pulls out your hurt and tosses it into the awaiting hands of friends to lift you back up. Not just recommended…essential.  –Matt Seward (Bridge 9)


KEITH CALMES:
All We Know Is Now, New Music for Classical Guitar: CD
This is what happens when punkers grow up and learn how to play. Really learn how to play. Calmes was a scrappy teen in Fresno’s Assertive Discipline in the 1980s. From there he went on earn three degrees in classical guitar performance. So you will find a few more than three chords on this record. But like the best punk rock, there is nothing here that is unnecessary. The pieces take the listener to stark, spare melodic landscapes. It’s great for Sunday mornings or when your parents come to visit—if you like your parents.  –Lisa Weiss (Self-released)


LABOR CAMP:
Through the Fence, Over the Hill, Under the Radar: CD
Nip Drivers guitarist Kurt Shellenbach dusts off his axe, rounds up some cohorts with similar underground pedigrees (Rosemary’s Billygoat, Jaded Apes), and they all delve into the world of bar rock. While there’s nothing inherently awful about their debut, and there are signs of real interesting ideas bubbling under the opening bluegrass instrumental “Diggin’ a Hole” and the arty, dissonant “Romantic Interlude,” the bulk of the songs here come off as unobtrusive blues-based rock at best, well played by a band that knows their way around their instruments but somehow not quite sparking here. Might do well for them to dig around a bit more in their collective punk pasts next go-’round. I’m not calling for a rehash of where they’ve been, but rather a suggestion to draw a little inspiration from that edge that made those earlier bands so interesting and use it to give some oomph to their present and propel their future, whether it be as a straight-ahead rock band, country, chamber orchestra, or whatever.  –jimmy (Pitiful)


LATE BLOOMER:
Things Change: LP
This Charlotte band emphasizes the “alt” in alt-punk to come away with a darker, more cohesive second LP. The record starts with “Use Your Words,” a melancholy buzzbin hit born twenty years late. Then come a couple six-minute songs as the first side slows and slips into sad lethargy. Things pick up on the flip, as Late Bloomer shines mid-’80s Hüsker Dü, Replacements, and Sonic Youth through their own dark lens, winding up with an album that recalls Dinosaur Jr.’s Without a Sound in atmosphere, aesthetic, and the fact that the hits are front-loaded. Excellent cover illustrations by Michael Muller.  –Chris Terry (Self Aware)


LOS CANADIANS / BLACK FORK:
Split: 7”
Reissue of a split that came out on Starcrunch when I was a one year old. Without knowing this fact, I originally condemned this release as basic. However, due to its age, I am going to absolve it of its troll-like shouts about the system and shittily recorded drums. If you were into pop punk in the ʻ90s you will probably go nuts for this, but little brats like me are best left listening to garage songs about pizza.  –Alanna Why (Shut Up)


LOVELY SORT OF DEATH, A:
New Beginnings: LP
Very heavy, I’m not quite sure what to make of Lovely Sort Of Death. I do like the fact that the lyrics are printed on the back of the sleeve, but I’m not sure I understand the music. Influenced by Albini Chicago sounds of the 1990s, it’s not especially contemporary, which is admirable in and of itself. The music sort of meanders, though, seeming to intentionally strive for a lack of accessibility. To some, this is probably a wildly creative, serious endeavor. But it’s pretty damn painful.  –Art Ettinger (Water Under The Bridge)


MAN, THE:
Carousel of Sound: 7” EP
If The Man formed in 1981, they’d have been in the Blade Runner soundtrack as something sad android blaster Rick Deckard could listen to in his hover car, or a song to hear buzzing out of the strip club speakers where replicant Zhora works before she gets zapped. Such is the disenchanted sci-fi hi-fi sound of tracks like “TV On,” where the chorus is a series of machine-precise down stroked rushes and halts that accent the rock holler of barely intelligible phrasings about a— member of the band? a hypothetical office anybody?—who hates his cubicle job so much he must zoom home, but only to smolder in front of the TV and get more soul poison. On tracks like “I Don’t Care” and “Pay,” The Man’s trio of office terror—guttural throat drags, merciless machine rhythms, trashy guitar solos—draw out the exhilarating and hilarious effect that has gotten The Man compared to a filthier version of Devo. Bring on the album! Until then, see the website for a vomit of misleading office buzz words and info graphs mish-mashed by the group. Fittingly, their contact address is a now closed coal factory on the city’s southwest side. –Jim Joyce (HoZac)


MANATEEES:
Seek Help: 7”
A big fat “Fuck you,” in two short, punk-as-fuck, misanthropic ditties. We can all appreciate those days when there seems to be an ass clown around every corner. Here’s another couple for that playlist.  –Jackie Rusted (Florida’s Dying)


MANTS, THE:
Self-titled: Cassette
If the tape cover and portmanteau band name are to be believed, The Mants are humanoid bugs who have touched down on Earth to rock our unsuspecting citizens. The whole “new to the planet” thing would explain how they’re able to play the same ol’ rock’n’roll riffs with such fury and conviction. These eight songs are a blast. I’d be shocked if The Mants’ home-planet shows aren’t a wild mess of space beer and smiling ant faces. Mission accomplished, Mants!  –Chris Terry (Shake!)


MARMARA STREISAND:
The Purity of Arms/Lullabies of Destruction: LP

I now know a grand total of one militant anarcho crust punk band from Israel. Tense and nerve-wracking, violin-heavy stuff mildly similar to Submission Hold or Sake, save for the old yowlin’-growler dude-vocals running throughout most of the songs. Most of it is pretty standard crust stuff, though there are a few tracks in which the ever-present violin is used to good effect to bulk up their more “traditional” Middle Eastern songs—and then a few random ones where they just freak their shit out Combat Wounded Veteran-style. A combination of their first two releases, the LP comes with a gigantic glossy poster and double-sided lyric sheet. Was a little too repetitive musically, but the band’s sense of rage and discontent directed at their government and security forces was palpable and came across loud and clear. 

–keith (Marmara Streisand)


MARTHA / SPOONBOY:
Split: 7”
Martha: Both songs are feel-good poppy punk with a strong Plan-It-X vibe. Martha strum the type of riffs that make you bob your head like a chicken. My only ding is that “1967, I Miss You, I’m Lonely” is featured on their latest LP, Courting Strong, soClatty Harriet” is the only exclusive. Regardless, good stuff and a great introduction to a charming band. Spoonboy: David Combs is a songwriter I’ve grown up following. I started playing acoustic guitar in high school partially because of I Love You, This Is a Robbery, so I can never say no to two new Spoonboy tunes. “Free Your Mind, Square” is traditional Spoonboy: stripped-down, twee pop punk rich with melodies, bursting with personality, and defiantly liberated. His second contribution, “Bloom Late or GTFO,” is a slowed-down ballad pledging “to appreciate the warmth of the blood that courses surely through my veins.” Listening to Spoonboy is like dusting the cobwebs in my heart. It’s just good for you.  –Sean Arenas (Nervous Nelly)


MARTHA:
Courting Strong: LP
Martha is as drool-worthy as an ice cream cone. They follow a standard recipe of milk, cream, and sugar with songs that don’t deviate much from traditional pop structure. Upon first nibble, Courting Strong seems like a reliable vanilla, satisfying enough on a hot day, yet never your first choice flavor. But, once you get past the initial creamy layer, you realize there was a vein of delicious caramel filling hidden inside. Each delectably delivered pop song is its own tasty flavor with subject matter ranging from the occult (“Cosmic Misery” warrants a whiplash-inducing double take) to high school infatuation (albeit a very British high school) to dealing with unfair gender roles (“Sleeping Beauty” would make any proud feminist yell out ‘YES!’). Like any good ice cream base, Martha takes basic ingredients and turns them into something memorable.  –Ashley (Salinas)


MARY MONDAY AND THE BITCHES:
“I Gave My Punk Jacket to Rickie” b/w “Popgun”: 7”
How the fuck did this record go un-reissued for so long? Apparently, “Popgun” is on one of the zillion Killed By Death comps but it’s slipped past my radar. The guitar has a searing, almost ear-bleeding tone, not unlike Crime or The Pagans. I can picture the guitarist shredding away, looking bored at having to actually play, cigarette dangling from his lips (and a quick search of the interwebs shows me a pic of said guitarist that almost fits the image in my head). Mary Monday has an almost bratty shout-sing that puts The Runaways to shame. The way the cover looks is exactly the way this record sounds. Apparently, the band came and went in a flash and Mary Monday died under mysterious circumstances. A shame, but listening to this record, there is a feel that life wasn’t long for these miscreants.  –Sal Lucci (Hozac)


MASKED INTRUDER:
M.I.: CD
Masked Intruder’s execution is a no-brainer: super catchy pop punk with lyrically bittersweet subject matter and a colorful ski mask gimmick. The part I don’t get is why the first half of this record is as formulaic as a Good Charlotte / Sum 41 split when there’s some genuinely catchy shit on the latter tracks a la Television City Dream Screeching Weasel. It could also be that I’ve long since waved goodbye to my interest in this genre and am now left staring at it like a third cousin whose name I’ve only heard in passing and, in all honesty, have no interest in warming up to. In any case, Masked Intruder have already struck gold with Fat and no matter how I feel, their popularity will surely only increase, so more power to them.  –Juan Espinosa (Fat)


ME FIRST AND THE GIMME GIMMES:
Are We Not Men? We Are Diva!: CD
While the world breathlessly awaits the proposed Kathleen Hanna-Miley Cyrus collab, there is this. All the pop songs you love to hate (or secretly admit to liking) done in a polished, punk mood. If you dug the Fugazi-Destiny’s Child mashup, this is your jam. I really thought that there was only room for one cover of Cher’s “Believe” (Tiltwheel’s) but on this disc the song gets a more campy, less earnest treatment. “My Heart Will Go On” takes on a Pogues-ish cast. A Christina Aguilera cover contains a T.S.O.L. Easter egg. Lady Gaga and The Dead Boys? It works. This is a wonderful bunch of tunes for turning your car/bike/skateboard into one of those private karaoke rooms. –Lisa Weiss (Fat)


MEMORY MAP:
The Sky As Well As Space: LP
Memory Map is a band based out of Bloomington, Indiana. I used to live in Bloomington for a few years. Sometimes when I think back on those times, I’m either like, “Ugh” or “Fun!” I went to visit Bloomington last summer and after I left I was like, “Meh.” But despite my mono-syllabic reactions to the city, this college town has something about it that allows for some great bands. This keeps me from souring on it entirely. The four men that make up Memory Map are another great reason to keep from feeling totally disaffected about the place. The band is comprised of three guitarists and a drummer, with various members singing. Some might recognize a few of the members: Matt Tobey used to play in Abe Froman and does a solo project called Matty Pop Chart; Mike Dixon has played in Prayer Breakfast, Rep Seki, and Rapider Than Horsepower; and Mike Bridavsky is the owner of the famous internet cat, Lil Bub. Besides Dixon’s vocals sounding similar to what he did with Prayer Breakfast, Memory Map doesn’t sound like any of those other acts. It’s actually math rock indie pop. There are lots of twists and turns in the intricate guitar work and Dixon’s vocals are smooth and go down easy. It reminds me of what The Rutabega would sound like if they played math rock and had another guitar player or two. The twelve songs on The Sky As Well As Space clock in at thirty-six minutes, which is a satisfying length for the sound. While the music could’ve just been a simple guitar and drums lineup, the band chose to add depth through the occasional use of piano, strings, bongos, and huge choir-like background vocals. While they probably can’t reproduce this sound live, on the album it keeps things alive and interesting from track to track. The front half of the album is stronger and more intricate, with songs like “Dark Freshman” and “Words as Water” being standouts. The back half of the albums slows down and is more pop than math rock, but, on the whole, it’s solid. It deserves many repeated listens to explore the full extent of the sound. Bloomington does it again. Fun!  –kurt (Joyful Noise)


MIRIAM:
Nobody’s Baby: CD
Miriam Linna is an original member of the long-lasting garage rock band The A-Bones as well as co-founder of the very storied Norton Records. Her roots to the early U.S. punk rock scene and continued dedication to ‘60s garage rock can be seen through both her band and her label. With these things in mind, it makes sense that the sound of this record—her very first solo album—would fit right in place with any expectations one might have for it. Part ‘60s Phil Spector girl group sound and part ‘60s garage psychedelia, the record feels like it could have come out in the ‘60s in both sound and aesthetic. It has just enough swagger to keep things interesting. It ultimately delivers the goods with twelve great songs that are very much worth repeated listens.  –Mark Twistworthy (Norton)


MISERY INDEX:
The Killing Gods: CD/LP/Cassette
It’s been four years since Misery Index’s last album, Heirs to Thievery. It was a blistering album that seemed to be the equivalent of getting hit by a semi truck on every song. It never let up with the blast beats and aggressive guitars. That lack of any sort of diversity made it a let down. The Killing Gods is different. There are still blast beats and shredding guitars but there are also guitar solos and some anthemic lines (“Cut the cord and start the fire!” on “The Weakener” being a great one). Misery Index has always been a combination of death, grind, crust, and hardcore, and all those genres can be heard on these twelve songs. Whereas the last album was full-on, the forty-four minutes of The Killing Gods has occasional moments that let the listener breathe, or at least as much as that is possible on an album this heavy. The overtly political message of the band continues, though, but in an intelligent manner. The first five tracks are a meditation on Faust as a symbol of society’s attempt at progress. It’s a literary approach, which shows the band’s intellect and creativity. One can only take so much of being beat over the head with blunt messages of “Government bad! Society sucks!” Then again, with two of the members working on graduate degrees, you’re going to get some more academic takes on the ills of the world. The rest of the album continues their exploration of such topics as apathy, the religious right, and drone warfare. The voice of Misery Index is important in the metal scene, as the music’s intensity and imagination matches that of the lyrics, and both work well together. It’s good to see the band back on track and progressing. Fans of death metal should definitely pick this one up.  –kurt (Season Of Mist)


MISSING MONUMENTS:
Self-titled: CD
Where to begin with King Louie and the MissingMonuments? Firstly, the CD version of their self-titled album is essentially a complete discography of sorts, minus the first 7” on Douchemaster and the single on Slovenly. You get the new record, along with their first LP Painted White, plus their EP on Hozac. And, I have to say, I thought that the Hozac record was one of the best short-players I heard last year. “Another Girl”—which is also on the new LP—and “Love You Back to Life” are pure hits. I think I added over a thousand views to that YouTube video for “Another Girl.” (Go watch it. It rips.) To say King Louie’s paid his dues is an understatement, to say the least. From Kajun SS to Exploding Hearts, he trail blazed through over ten years of American punk rock. With that in mind, you can’t ignore the rock’n’roll swagger in his songwriting. While a lot of people don’t know who the Devil Dogs are, the rest of us never forget. The new batch of songs is exactly what you’d expect, and I mean that in the best possible way. Don’t change.  –Steve Adamyk (Dirtnap)


MISSIONARY:
American Strike: EP
New band from NYC that sounds like an old band from Boston. Thuggy hardcore not unlike some of the stompier SSD or Negative FX. For newer bands, think maybe Rival Mob or U.K.’s Violent Reaction. It’s mostly hardcore but these dudes have definitely checked some oi faves out before penning these tunes. Anyone who knows me knows that I eat this shit up. Also comes with a sick newspaper lyric sheet. Boss tunes.  –Tim Brooks (Warthog Speak)


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